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Moving PBIS Forward with Quality, Equity and Efficiency 2013 NEPBIS Conference Rob Horner, University of Oregon www.pbis.orgwww.pbis.org www.uoecs.orgwww.uoecs.org.

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Presentation on theme: "Moving PBIS Forward with Quality, Equity and Efficiency 2013 NEPBIS Conference Rob Horner, University of Oregon www.pbis.orgwww.pbis.org www.uoecs.orgwww.uoecs.org."— Presentation transcript:

1 Moving PBIS Forward with Quality, Equity and Efficiency 2013 NEPBIS Conference Rob Horner, University of Oregon

2 Goals Context for conference Themes that unite us Current and future directions for PBIS  Quality  Equity  Efficiency

3 Data use Focus of NEPBIS Sessions

4 As You Attend Sessions What are the specific procedures? How do the procedure benefit students? What is the science supporting recommendations in the session? What are the systems for achieving implementation and sustainability?

5 Challenge: A New Message Re-designing future education Effective practices (Quality) Efficient practices (Efficient) Equitable practices (Equity) KEY MESSAGE: As Resources are ADDED back to Education we must be prepared to use those resources differently, better, more efficiently than we have in the past

6 What Quality Equity Efficiency How Evidence-based practices Multi-tiered Systems of Support Organizational Systems that support effective practices

7 Themes Affecting Education: Multi-tiered Systems, Evidence-based Practices, Organizational Systems Performance Assessment (Fidelity) Coaching Training Selection Systems Intervention Facilitative Administration Decision Support Data System Competency Organization Effective Implementation Multi-tiered Systems of Support Evidence-based Practices Organizational Systems

8 Functional Behavioral Assessment Environmental Redesign Teaching Social, Academic and Communication Skills Remove Rewards for Problem Behavior Enhance Rewards for Desired Behavior

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10 © Dean Fixsen, Karen Blase, Robert Horner, George Sugai, 2008 Federal SPENDING on K-12 Education under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and NAEP READING Scores (Age 9)

11 Continuum of Supports Universal Prevention Identify expectations Teach Monitor Acknowledge Correct Targeted Intervention Check-in, Checkout Social skills training Mentoring Organizational skills Self-monitoring Intensive Intervention Individualized, functional assessment based behavior support plan Procedures and Systems

12 The Promise of SWPBIS The fundamental purpose of SWPBIS is to make schools more effective learning environments. Predictable Consistent Positive Safe

13 School-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS) The social culture of a school matters. A continuum of supports that begins with the whole school and extends to intensive, wraparound support for individual students and their families. Effective practices with the systems needed for high fidelity and sustainability Multiple tiers of intensity

14 What is “School-wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Support?” School-wide PBIS is:  A framework for establishing the social culture and behavioral supports needed for a school to be an effective learning environment for all students. Evidence-based features of SWPBIS  Prevention  Define and teach positive social expectations  Acknowledge positive behavior  Arrange consistent consequences for problem behavior  On-going collection and use of data for decision-making  Continuum of intensive, individual intervention supports.  Implementation of the systems that support effective practices

15 Establishing a Social Culture Common Vision/Values Common Language Common Experience MEMBERSHIP

16 Elements of Effective School Climate Clear expectations Caring relationships Meaningful participation Perceived school safety School connectedness Low violence perpetration Low violence victimization Low harassment and bullying Low substance use at school Adam Voight | Gregory Austin | Thomas Hanson A Climate for Academic Success: How School Climate Distinguishes Schools That Are Beating the Achievement Odds (2013)

17 Goal & Results The goal of this study is to determine what makes successful schools different from other schools. Rather than define success in absolute terms—such as the percentage of students who are proficient on a standardized test—this study’s definition is based on whether or not a school is performing better than predicted given the characteristics of the students it serves. Using data from over 1,700 California public middle and high schools, 40 schools were identified that consistently performed better than predicted on standardized tests of math and English language arts achievement. These schools were labeled “beating-the-odds” (BTO) schools “The results of this study show that ‘Beating The Odds’ schools had substantially more positive levels of school climate than other schools”.

18 School Climate Index: Total Score

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20 Number of Schools Implementing SWPBIS since ,054

21 Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior ~80% of Students ~15% ~5% SCHOOL-WIDE POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT Main Ideas: 1.Invest in prevention first 2.Multiple tiers of support intensity 3.Early/rapid access to support

22 Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings Secondary Prevention: Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior ~80% of Students SCHOOL-WIDE POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT

23 Quality, Equity, Efficiency

24 Quality (PBIS works) Evidence-based Practices Behavior Support Family Systems Social skills development Equity ( PBIS works for all ) All Students Race/ Ethnicity Disability Gender Sexual Preference Efficiency (PBIS saves time and money) Procedures and Systems Practical Acceptable Effective/ Better Economical

25 Experimental Research on SWPBIS Bradshaw, C.P., Koth, C.W., Thornton, L.A., & Leaf, P.J. (2009). Altering school climate through school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: Findings from a group-randomized effectiveness trial. Prevention Science, 10(2), Bradshaw, C.P., Koth, C.W., Bevans, K.B., Ialongo, N., & Leaf, P.J. (2008). The impact of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) on the organizational health of elementary schools. School Psychology Quarterly, 23(4), Bradshaw, C. P., Mitchell, M. M., & Leaf, P. J. (2010). Examining the effects of School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports on student outcomes: Results from a randomized controlled effectiveness trial in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 12, Bradshaw, C.P., Reinke, W. M., Brown, L. D., Bevans, K.B., & Leaf, P.J. (2008). Implementation of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) in elementary schools: Observations from a randomized trial. Education & Treatment of Children, 31, Bradshaw, C., Waasdorp, T., Leaf. P., (in press). Effects of School-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports on child behavior problems and adjustment. Pediatrics. Horner, R., Sugai, G., Smolkowski, K., Eber, L., Nakasato, J., Todd, A., & Esperanza, J., (2009). A randomized, wait-list controlled effectiveness trial assessing school-wide positive behavior support in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 11, Horner, R. H., Sugai, G., & Anderson, C. M. (2010). Examining the evidence base for school-wide positive behavior support. Focus on Exceptionality, 42(8), Ross, S. W., Endrulat, N. R., & Horner, R. H. (2012). Adult outcomes of school-wide positive behavior support. Journal of Positive Behavioral Interventions. 14(2) Waasdorp, T., Bradshaw, C., & Leaf, P., (2012) The Impact of Schoolwide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports on Bullying and Peer Rejection: A Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Trial. Archive of Pediatric Adolescent Medicine. 2012;166(2): Bradshaw, Pas, Goldweber, Rosenberg, & Leaf, 2012 Bradshaw, C., Waasdorp, T., & Leaf P. (in press) Examining the variation in the impact of School-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. Pediatrics SWPBIS Experimentally Related to: 1.Reduction in problem behavior 2.Increased academic performance 3.Increased attendance 4.Improved perception of safety 5.Reduction in bullying behaviors 6.Improved organizational efficiency 7.Reduction in staff turnover 8.Increased perception of teacher efficacy 9.Improved Social Emotional competence SWPBIS Experimentally Related to: 1.Reduction in problem behavior 2.Increased academic performance 3.Increased attendance 4.Improved perception of safety 5.Reduction in bullying behaviors 6.Improved organizational efficiency 7.Reduction in staff turnover 8.Increased perception of teacher efficacy 9.Improved Social Emotional competence

26 Office Discipline Referrals per 100 students per school day Illinois ODR per 100 per day N = 92 schools N = 486 schools Eber et al., 2013

27 Mean Students Suspended per year Illinois Mean count of students suspended N = 81 schools N = 347 schools Eber et al., 2013

28 Mean Days of Student Suspension per year Illinois Mean school suspension days N = 80 schools N = 416 schools Eber et al., 2013

29 Using PBS to Achieve Quality, Equity and Efficiency QUALITY: Using what works; Linking Academic and Behavior Supports  Steve Goodman (valued outcomes)  Commitment to Fidelity Measures EQUITY: Making schools work for all  Scott Ross  Russ Skiba  Vincent, Cartledge, May & Tobin  Bully prevention EFFICIENCY: Working Smarter; Building implementation science into large scale adoption.  Using teacher and student time better.  Dean Fixsen/ Oregon Dept of Education

30 Literacy Risk Tier I Risk Tier II Risk Tier III Risk

31 Cumulative Mean ODRs Cumulative Mean ODRs Per Month for 325+ Elementary Schools Jennifer Frank, Kent McIntosh, Seth May

32 Being Practical Implement SWPBIS locally One Example: Tier II and Tier III behavior support Identify students in need of more support Conduct assessment (behavioral, academic, social, mental health) Develop an individualized plan Technically sound Contextually appropriate Implement How to do this efficiently? Kathleen Strickland-Cohen

33 Preliminary Evidence: When PBIS is linked to reduction in ODRs does reduction occur for students from all ethnic groups? From: Vincent, Cartledge, May & Tobin, 2009 Main Messages: 1.Reduction in ODRs occurred for all ethnic groups 2.Racial disproportionality remained, just at a lower level of intensity.

34 Pre PBIS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

35 What does a reduction of 850 office referrals and 25 suspensions mean? Kennedy Middle School Savings in Administrative time ODR = 15 min Suspension = 45 min 13,875 minutes 231 hours 29, 8-hour days Savings in Student Instructional time ODR = 45 min Suspension = 216 min 43,650 minutes 728 hours hour school days

36 Use the Systems within PBIS Multi-tiered approach includes both practices and organizational systems  Behavior support  Literacy support  Math/Numeracy support  Writing support  Mental health support  Social Emotional Learning Engineering Effective Education  Combine the compassion of personal relationships with the science of human learning and behavior.

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38 Summary PBIS is expanding to an increasingly wide range of settings/ disciplines. We need to remain clear about the themes that unite us PBIS is more relevant today than ever because of the promise we bring:  Quality, Equity, Efficiency Leave the Conference energized  Impressed by the knowledge of your peers  Informed about practices and procedures that work  Clear about how you will bring the promise of PBIS to your students and families

39 PBIS Science Values Vision Practices that work Practices that affect quality of life Practices that are practical, durable and available


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