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Introduction To Integration Project Management Methodology No. M14 August, 2000.

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Presentation on theme: "Introduction To Integration Project Management Methodology No. M14 August, 2000."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction To Integration Project Management Methodology No. M14 August, 2000

2 2 Contents Purpose and Objectives Critical Success Factors & Pitfalls Planning & Monitoring Formats Tasks, Work Breakdown Structure & Resource Assignment Role of the Integration Management Office (IMO)

3 3 Purpose & Objectives Explore fundamental tools and techniques Illustrate principles of project management Demonstrate the value of using project planning tools and techniques Provide simple guidelines to facilitate the use of project planning Illustrate the reasons to invest the time required to do effective planning

4 4 Effective Project Planning: Critical Success Factors Start the planning process early (prior to closing if possible) Link the business strategy to tactical planning Describe the overall integration plan (for various constituents across both businesses) Manage planning and execution rigorously Document the impact to the business Communicate frequently, clearly and uniformly Involve and mobilize employees Plan-Do-Review Address efforts proactively and avoid firefighting

5 5 Pitfalls: When Companies Fail to Plan Effectively Employee uncertainty and frustration can negatively impact customers and stakeholders (value destruction) Organizational turmoil may increase unwanted employee turnover Managers spend too much time on minutiae, firefighting or employee concerns instead of the key activities The integration time line may become understated, while expected benefits become delayed or unrealized

6 6 Integration Program Management: Key Planning/Monitoring Formats M O N I T O R I N G Flash Reports Planning Matrix Benefits Tracking Activity Work Plans Team Charters Issues Log Status Reports Functional Synergy Worksheets Commun. Needs Log P L A N N I N G

7 7 Primary Uses For Each Of The Planning/Monitoring Formats

8 8 Planning/Monitoring Formats: Integration Planning Matrix Purpose: Provides a format to describe the intended end state for each functional/process area, and acts as a roadmap for the business integration effort Provides the first comprehensive view of an integrated end state and anticipated benefits

9 9 Planning/Monitoring Formats: Work Team Charters

10 10 Purpose: Provides context for the teams reason for being Identifies the WHY, WHAT, WHO and WHEN for team activity at a very high level. Planning/Monitoring Formats: Work Team Charters WORK TEAM CHARTER

11 11 Planning/Monitoring Formats: Activity Work Plans Purpose: Provides the work breakdown and timing for the integration program Provides timing, dependencies and primary responsibility for each activity

12 12 Purpose: Provides a standard format for documenting estimates of revenue enhancing, cost reduction or cash flow enhancing improvements anticipated from integration team activities Planning/Monitoring Formats: Functional Synergy Worksheets Detail

13 13 Planning/Monitoring Formats: Functional Synergy Worksheets Summary

14 14 Planning/Monitoring Formats: Functional Synergy Worksheets Overview

15 15 Planning/Monitoring Formats: Status Reports Purpose: Provides a periodic update of the extent to which work plan activities are complete Provides clarifying commentary regarding activity status as required

16 16 Planning/Monitoring Formats: Flash Reports Purpose: Provides a high level bullet-point update of team events and progress for a particular timeframe Provides a vehicle to surface progress- limiting issues

17 17 Planning/Monitoring Formats: Benefits Tracking Log Purpose: To provide a format to track benefits expected, responsible personnel, and timeline. Specific responsibility and timeframes should be assigned.

18 18 Planning/Monitoring Formats: Issue Log Purpose: To provide a format to track issues that are outside the control of a single team, and that will inhibit progress unless resolved

19 19 Planning/Monitoring Formats: Communications Needs Log Purpose: Provide a vehicle to identify topics that need to be communicated to either internal or external constituencies Provide a major input to the program office in their effort to disseminate program information

20 20 Project Planning Stages: Overview Elements of Work Work Breakdown Structure What Really Needs to be Done? Identifying key milestones Defining phases/tasks/activities Defining Project Dimensions WBS structure tree Identifying major topics of focus Assigning Resources Skills Inventory Responsibility Matrix Scheduled refinement Getting Who You Need Definition of Dependencies What Needs to be in Place First? Understanding predecessor relationships Sequencing & preliminary schedules

21 Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)

22 22 Objectives: Work Breakdown Structure To establish a common method to divide complex, multi- faceted programs into a consistent set of dimensions To enable viewing a project plan in a hierarchical (taxonomic) order To provide a structure to break larger efforts (e.g., phases, deliverables) into more discrete building elements (i.e. tasks, activities, action steps)

23 23 List the dimensions in which people will be doing work By Team, By Geographic Area, By Topic, By Deliverable, By Phase, By Activity, etc. Decide by which dimensions you will potentially want to “slice” (view) the ultimate work plan (e.g., all work happening in Asia) Rationalize and standardize on a common set of planning dimensions Organize these dimensions into a standard hierarchy Orient all team leaders to the standard work breakdown hierarchy to which all project plans will conform Approach: Work Breakdown Structure

24 24 Work Breakdown Structure Tree Chart Team Sub-Team Geography Topic Of Focus Note: Work Breakdown Structures set the stage for resource planning, roles and responsibility mapping and identifying interdependencies to other integration deliverables 1. 1.1 1.2 1.2.11.2.21.2.31.2.4 1.2.4.11.2.4.21.2.4.31.2.4.41.2.4.51.2.4.6 Etc. The lowest levels of the hierarchy represent the actual work... Phases, Activities and Tasks The lowest levels of the hierarchy represent the actual work... Phases, Activities and Tasks

25 25 Work Breakdown Structure Example 1. 1.1 1.1.1 1.1.1.1 1.1.1.1.1 1.1.1.1.1.1

26 26 Example: Work Plan Using A Pre- Defined Work Breakdown Structure Note the use of left to right indentation to accentuate the WBS hierarchy Team Sub-Team Region Country Topic of Focus Activities

27 Elements of Work

28 28 Elements of Work Shared Service Center Operational Define Organization Structure Identify Open Positions Recruit for Open Positions Train Staff Milestones Interim goals that are used to track the progress of the project. These events typically represent the beginning or end of a phase. Milestones Interim goals that are used to track the progress of the project. These events typically represent the beginning or end of a phase. Phases A phase represents major stages of The project. It consists of a group of related tasks. Breaking the project Into phases allows you to focus on One aspect of the project at a time. Phases A phase represents major stages of The project. It consists of a group of related tasks. Breaking the project Into phases allows you to focus on One aspect of the project at a time. Tasks/Activities A task represents actual work that will be done on your project. Completion of task moves the project forward measurably. Tasks/Activities A task represents actual work that will be done on your project. Completion of task moves the project forward measurably. As-Is Assessment Requirements Definition Development Implementation Examples

29 29 Remember: The Bottom-Level Tasks Should... Have a tangible or measurable output/ outcome Be unambiguous Work within the same task should occur within a sequential or parallel time frame or order Should only include related work elements Have identifiable and readily available inputs Be a finite, manageable unit of work Require a limited number of resources - most steps should have a single team member responsible Fit into the natural order of work progression

30 Definition of Dependencies

31 31 Types Of Dependencies Finish-to-Start Dependency Type Gantt Chart Depiction Start-to-Start Finish-to-Finish Start-to-Finish A task starts after its predecessor finishes A task starts when its predecessor starts A task finishes when its predecessor finishes A task finishes after its predecessor starts

32 32 Determining Task Dependencies: An Example Of Building A House Task Node: Implies Work Effort Exerted and Deliverable Completed Dependency Arrow: Shows Task Relationships from Predecessor to Successor Grade Land Rough In Electrical Dig/Pour Foundation Paint Exterior Frame House Rough In Plumbing Paint Interior Install Windows & Siding Install Roof Finish Walls Move In

33 33 Guidelines for Validating Task Interdependence For each task, ask: What must be done before? What can be done at the same time? What will be done after? A A A

34 Assigning Resources

35 Objectives: To introduce a structured approach to participative management and informed decision making. To establish clear work roles in a framework that facilitates work assignment, management, measuring and alignment. To offer a logical process that lays out work deliverables and tasks to be performed, then assigns accountability, responsibility, contribution expectations and identifies who needs to be informed that these activities are going on. ARCI is an iterative and empowering process that resolves ambiguities, omissions, redundancies and confusion surrounding work assignment and performance. Roles and Responsibility Mapping:

36 Accountability:Makes the Decision The person ultimately accountable. Includes strategic authority, yes-no, veto and assignment powers, and final approval. Responsibility:Perform the work The person(s) assigned the job by the “A”. Includes tactical responsibility for doing the work and completing the tasks. Contribute:Communicate the work (2-way) The person(s) who provide special support or should be consulted in making decisions or doing work. Inform:Socialize the Work (1-way) The person(s) needing to be informed at key decision points during the work. The work’s providers, customers and beneficiaries. A I C R Roles and Responsibility Mapping (ARCI) Key Definitions

37 37 1.Assess requirements 2.Design business system 3.Identify potential package options 4.Purchase package 5.Modify purchased package 6.Modify in-house procedures 7.etc. 8.etc. 9.etc. 10.etc. 11.etc. 12.etc. Sample ARCI Matrix. A Accountable R Responsible C Contribute I Inform Marty B Don M. Nancy S Ed W Laurie M Scott W Will B Doc Prod AAAA R A,R A.R A,R A.R A A.R R A.R A,R RRRRRR CRCR Bob L Sharon C C C By Individual Accountable Inform Respon- sible Contribute

38 38 Integration Management Office The Integration Management Office will be the “nerve center” for the integration program The Integration Management Office will be the “nerve center” for the integration program IMO Protocols Functional Integration Teams Divisional Executive Group Master Planning Communication Benefits/Budget Tracking Performance Measures Roles & Responsibilities Decisions Cross-Company Resources Engineering: Purchasing: PC&L: IS&S: HR: Finance: Mfg/Ops Facilities ERP Quick Hits Change Management Training and Skills Transfer Implementation Management Project Planning and Scheduling Measures, Tracking and Reporting Knowledge Capture and Management Communications and Culture-Building ERP Quick Hits Change Management Training and Skills Transfer Implementation Management Project Planning and Scheduling Measures, Tracking and Reporting Knowledge Capture and Management Communications and Culture-Building Issues Log

39 39 Provide the physical and virtual environment to support: Program Management Communications Knowledge Sharing Provide the physical and psychological space for the Integration Manager and team members to conduct meetings, facilitate communications, maintain files and documents, resolve issues and prominently display progress Provide uniform global access of integration information to teams Provide visibility regarding program performance Provide the resources to orient/train integration participants and oversee consistent execution Role & Responsibilities – Integration Management Office Ensure that roles & responsibilities are clearly articulated Provide a formal mechanism/cycle for program review Provide a “hot line” to the organization regarding integration activities

40 40 The Physical IMO Environment Should Prominently Display Plans and Progress Example of “War Room” wall in the IMO Project ApproachProject ScheduleProject Benefits Early Win ScoreboardProject ARCIWeekly Flash Reports Work Team Charter X X X X X X X X X X X XXXXXXXXXXXX Goal Goal Goal


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