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Finding U.S. Census Bureau Data on Languages and Origin Susan Bauckus, NHLRC July 17, 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Finding U.S. Census Bureau Data on Languages and Origin Susan Bauckus, NHLRC July 17, 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Finding U.S. Census Bureau Data on Languages and Origin Susan Bauckus, NHLRC July 17, 2012

2 We’ll find: 1) Total % of LOTE speakers + foreign born 2) # of speakers of particular LOTEs in a given area (nation, state, county, city)

3 The American Community Survey’s question re: language: “Does this person speak a language other than English at home? [if yes] What is this language? ______ How well does this person speak English? -- very well, well, not well, not at all.”

4 Heritage language is a family phenomenon

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7 To find % of LOTE speakers and the foreign- born in a given area: Go to “Quick Facts” on the Census Bureau’s home page:

8 From there go to “Quick Facts” Look in “quick start” for 3 levels relevant to you: State County Your city or a city in your county

9 Speakers of a Language other than English at Home, age 5+, by percent U.S. 20.1% California 43% Los Angeles County 56.4% Alhambra City 74.2% Concentrations often intensify in more urban areas

10 To find tables listing particular LOTEs (39 total listed), start at American Fact Finder: find link atwww.census.gov bottom of page Type in Table # B16001 …

11 African languages Arabic Armenian Chinese French (incl. Patois, Cajun) French Creole German Greek Gujarati Hebrew Hindi Hmong Hungarian Italian Japanese Korean Laotian Mon-Khmer, Cambodian Navajo Persian Polish Portuguese or Portuguese Creole Russian Scandinavian languages Serbo-Croatian Spanish or Spanish Creole Speak only English Tagalog Thai Urdu Vietnamese Yiddish Other Asian languages Other Indic languages Other Indo-European languages Other Native North American languages Other Pacific Island languages 39 Languages/groups Included in Table B16001:

12 In this form the table is not very useful. Use Tutorial #2 on the workshop’s demographics page to delete some components and reorder the languages spoken from most to least spoken.

13 1) Sort the LOTEs alphabetically by using the “sort” function 2) delete all the “speak English well” and “not well” entries 3) sort by the right-hand column in descending order. This is what you will end up with (after adding heading). For details see Tutorial #2.

14 More variation re: languages can be observed in subdivisions of urban areas, e.g., small cities and census tracts.

15 Examples of Variation in a Large Urban Area: Most Spoken LOTEs in Descending Order Los Angeles County: English, Spanish, Chinese, Tagalog, Korean, Armenian, Persian Cities in Los Angeles County West Hollywood – English, Russian, Spanish, French, Persian Glendale – Armenian, English, Spanish, Korean Westminster – Vietnamese, English, Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, Tagalog Long Beach – English, Spanish, Khmer Beverly Hills – English, Persian, Spanish, Hebrew Alhambra – Chinese, English, Spanish, Vietnamese

16 numbers Connecting the dots: family ties strengthening academic skills identity HL as job skill Advocacy/explaining: arguing for teacher ed collaboration across langs persuading admin., colleagues, parents, kids, gen’l population Internal/external funding Publications: academic and non-academic articles public relations (brochures, websites, etc.) Informing, justifying decisions on languages for HLL classes/programs General cultural literacy about nation/community as part of HL education

17 From: Walters & Trevelyan, The Newly Arrived Foreign-Born Population of the United States: 2010 (2011), pp. 3-6.

18 About the future (from Walters & Trevelyan (2011)): “The data indicate that newer immigrants may be choosing to reside in locations beyond the traditional ‘gateway’ states and increasingly settling in states with smaller foreign-born populations not typically viewed as major immigrant destinations.

19 “…. Of the six traditional gateway states, three (California, Illinois, and New York) had a lower proportion of recent entrants than the national average …. Several states with histories of lighter immigration had consider­ ably higher proportions of recent entrants.”

20 Non-traditional point-of-entry states w/ largest foreign-born population entering in 2005 or later: Alabama Kentucky Louisiana Mississippi North Dakota South Dakota West Virginia Wyoming Walters & Trevelyan, The Newly Arrived Foreign-Born Population of the United States: 2010 (2011), pp acsbr pdf

21 Continuing robust immigration, including movement into non- traditional “gateway” states, may suggest the need for expanded and increased HL education

22 For Information: see NHLRC’s Demographics Page: (search/find from nhlrc.ucla.edu) has tutorials and links to U.S. Census Bureau pages, Table numbers, and other information

23 Please send questions, comments, and feedback to


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