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Norma Sanchez Instruction and Professional Development (IPD) Staff

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1 Norma Sanchez Instruction and Professional Development (IPD) Staff
Assessment Overview Norma Sanchez Instruction and Professional Development (IPD) Staff

2 SBAC Consortium of States
24 States representing 39% of K-12 students 22 Governing 1 Advisory 1 Affiliate Washington State is fiscal agent WestEd provides project management services *California is a Governing State

3 English Language Arts and Mathematics, Grades 3–8 and High School
PERFORMANCE TASKS Reading Writing Math END OF YEAR ADAPTIVE ASSESSMENT English Language Arts and Mathematics, Grades 3–8 and High School Computer Adaptive Assessment and Performance Tasks BEGINNING OF YEAR END OF YEAR INTERIM ASSESSMENT Last 12 weeks of year* DIGITAL CLEARINGHOUSE of formative tools, processes and exemplars; released items and tasks; model curriculum units; educator training; professional development tools and resources; scorer training modules; and teacher collaboration tools. Digital Library Computer Adaptive Assessment and Performance Tasks Scope, sequence, number, and timing of interim assessments locally determined Re-take option Optional Interim assessment system— Summative assessment for accountability * Time windows may be adjusted based on results from the research agenda and final implementation decisions. 3 Source:

4 Improving Teaching & Learning
June 3, 2013 Improving Teaching & Learning Summative: College and career readiness assessments for accountability Teachers and schools have information and tools they need to improve teaching and learning Common Core State Standards specify K-12 expectations for college and career readiness All students leave high school college and career ready Formative resources: Supporting classroom-based assessments to improve instruction Interim: Flexible and open assessments, used for actionable feedback 4

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6 Bloom’s Taxonomy Updated
Creating Evaluating Analyzing 2010 Common Core Standards Applying Understanding 1997 Standards Remembering

7 Bloom’s Taxonomy Updated
Creating Generating new ideas, products, or ways of viewing things Designing, constructing, planning, producing, inventing. Evaluating Justifying a decision or course of action Checking, hypothesizing, critiquing, experimenting, judging Analyzing Breaking information into parts to explore understandings and relationships Comparing, organizing, deconstructing, interrogating, finding Applying Using information in another familiar situation Implementing, carrying out, using, executing Understanding Explaining ideas or concepts Interpreting, summarizing, paraphrasing, classifying, explaining Remembering Recalling information Recognizing, listing, describing, retrieving, naming, finding

8 Cognitive Learning CCSS require high-level cognitive demand
Asking students to demonstrate deeper conceptual understanding through the application of content knowledge and skills to new situations and sustained tasks Applies Webb’s Depth of Knowledge (DOK) to Bloom’s Cognitive Process Dimensions Bloom: What type of thinking is needed to complete a task? Webb: How deeply do you have to understand the content to successfully interact with it? How complex or abstract is the content?

9

10 Webb’s Depth of Knowledge (DOK) Levels
DOK 1: Recall & Reproduction Recall of a fact, term, principle, concept; perform a routine procedure, locate details DOK 2: Basic Application of Skills/Concepts Use of information, two or more steps with decision points along the way, explain relationships DOK 3: Strategic Thinking Requires reasoning or developing a plan or sequence of steps, requires decision-making or justification DOK 4: Extended Thinking An investigation or application to real world; requires time to research, problem solve, and process multiple conditions; could require synthesis of information across multiple sources and/or disciplines

11 ELA DOK Levels

12 MATH DOK Levels

13 Bloom to Webb’s DOK Levels

14 ELA Claims Claim #1 Reading Claim #2 Writing Claim #3
Overall Claim for Grades 3–8 “Students can demonstrate progress toward college and career readiness in English language arts and literacy.” Overall Claim for Grade 11 “Students can demonstrate college and career readiness in English language arts and literacy.” Claim #1 Reading “Students can read closely and analytically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational texts.” Claim #2 Writing “Students can produce effective and well-grounded writing for a range of purposes and audiences.” Claim #3 Speaking and Listening “Students can employ effective speaking and listening skills for a range of purposes and audiences.” Claim #4 Research/Inquiry “Students can engage in research and inquiry to investigate topics, and to analyze, integrate, and present information.” Nancy spoke about the Smarter Balanced Content Specifications and how, the specifications, were developed to guide assessment design. As Nancy also pointed out, there are claims within the content specifications; the four claims for mathematics can be seen on the current slide. These claims are the statements of what students can do and the evidence needed to show what they can do. The Claims begin on p. 25 in the Content Specifications, with claim 1, Concepts and Procedures. Claim #1 focuses on the CCSS-M Content Standards; the standards we reviewed relevant vocabulary on, a few slides prior. Claims 2 through 4, Problem Solving, Communicating Reasoning, and Modeling and Data Analysis focus on the Standards for Mathematical Practices. Remember, the mathematical practices specify how a student should be engaged mathematically when solving an item or task.

15 Math Claims Claim #1 Concepts & Procedures Claim #2 Problem Solving
Overall Claim for Grades 3–8 “Students can demonstrate progress toward college and career readiness in mathematics.” Overall Claim for Grade 11 “Students can demonstrate college and career readiness in mathematics.” Claim #1 Concepts & Procedures “Students can explain and apply mathematical concepts and interpret and carry out mathematical procedures with precision and fluency.” Claim #2 Problem Solving “Students can solve a range of complex well-posed problems in pure and applied mathematics, making productive use of knowledge and problem solving strategies.” Claim #3 Communicating Reasoning “Students can clearly and precisely construct viable arguments to support their own reasoning and to critique the reasoning of others.” Claim #4 Modeling and Data Analysis “Students can analyze complex, real-world scenarios and can construct and use mathematical models to interpret and solve problems.” Nancy spoke about the Smarter Balanced Content Specifications and how, the specifications, were developed to guide assessment design. As Nancy also pointed out, there are claims within the content specifications; the four claims for mathematics can be seen on the current slide. These claims are the statements of what students can do and the evidence needed to show what they can do. The Claims begin on p. 25 in the Content Specifications, with claim 1, Concepts and Procedures. Claim #1 focuses on the CCSS-M Content Standards; the standards we reviewed relevant vocabulary on, a few slides prior. Claims 2 through 4, Problem Solving, Communicating Reasoning, and Modeling and Data Analysis focus on the Standards for Mathematical Practices. Remember, the mathematical practices specify how a student should be engaged mathematically when solving an item or task.

16 Claims 2, 3, & 4: Relevant Verbs
Problem Solving Understand Solve Apply Describe Illustrate Interpret Analyze Communicating Reasoning Explain Justify Prove Derive Assess Modeling & Data Analysis Model Construct Compare Investigate Build Estimate Summarize Represent Evaluate Extend Claim 2 Claim 3 Claim 4 Now let’s go back and take a look at the relevant verbs that will aid educators in determining which cluster headings will be assessed through claims 2, 3 and/or 4 While it is relatively easy to match up the content standards to the assessment targets in claim 1, it is a little different with claims 2, 3, and 4. The table on this slide lists the relevant verbs identified for each claim; notice that some verbs, such as understand and analyze fall in multiple claims. The relevant verbs will help in identifying the Math Content Clusters and/or standards that will be assessed for each claim. Once the claim is identified through the verbs, the assessment targets that align are dependent on the primary domain and cluster heading being assessed. Certain content lends itself more nicely with certain assessment targets under claims 2, 3 or 4. We will look at determining assessments targets through relevant verbs more closely later on in the webinar when we discuss implications for instruction.

17 Accessibility & Accommodations
CDE website with details: 17

18 Accessibility & Accommodations
18

19 Supports for English language learners
Full Translation Spanish Full translation Pop-Up Glossaries Dialect(s) Mexico, Puerto Rico, El Salvador Vietnamese North and South Arabic Standard dialect is most popular Filipino Tagalog, Ilokano Punjabi Korean Standardized text Russian Chinese, Cantonese Simplified and traditional Chinese, Mandarin Ukrainian

20 Assembly Bill 484 Assembly Bill (AB) 484, chaptered into law October 2, 2013, established the Measurement of Academic Performance and Progress (MAPP). Through regulation, the name has been changed to the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP). CAASPP replaces the Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program. Among the requirements set forth in AB 484 is the requirement that local educational agencies (LEAs) participate in the Smarter Balanced Field Test.

21 2014 Smarter Balanced Field Test Windows
The Smarter Balanced Field Test will be administered March 18 through June 6, 2014. Each school has been assigned a six-week window within this time frame and may test anytime within that assigned window. On November 20, 2013, Educational Testing Service (ETS) released testing window assignments for schools and notified LEA testing coordinators. Test window assignments are available at

22 Field Test Details Students in grades 3–8, grade 11, and a small sample of students in grades 9 and 10 will participate in the field test. The field test is estimated to take approximately 3.5 hours, although it is untimed. Students exempt from participation in the field test: Students who take the California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA). For ELA only, English learners who have attended school in the United States for less than 12 months Those unable to take test on the computer

23 Field Test Resources Preparation:
Sample Test Items and Performance Tasks performance-tasks/ Practice Test New Training Test: https://sbacpt.tds.airast.org/student/

24 Comparison of Training Test and Practice Test
Purpose Provide students with an opportunity to quickly become familiar with the software and interface features Provide students with a grade specific testing experience that is similar in structure and format to the field test Grade Levels 3 grade bands 3–5 6–8 High school Each grade 3–8, 11 Number and Types of Items Approximately 15 items per grade band (6 in ELA and 8–9 in math) No performance task (PT) Approximately 30 items in ELA and 30 items in math per grade level Includes 1 ELA PT and 1 math PT per grade level Universal Tools, Designated Supports, and Accommodations All included on Field Test are included Most included Refresh scheduled for late April Scoring Results are not scored Results are not scored, however answer keys and scoring rubrics are available

25 Five Item Types Selected Response Constructed Response
Extended Response Performance Tasks Technology-Enhanced To collect evidence about the wide range of assessment targets, Smarter Balanced will use a variety of item and task types. These item and task types fall into six broad categories and include {+} Selected Response items, Constructed Response items, Extended Response items, and Performance Tasks. In addition, there are two categories of technology-rich items and tasks known as Technology-Enabled And Technology-Enhanced. Each of these item and task types will be explored in greater detail in the item and task type modules. But let’s take a brief look at each category now. 25

26 Benefits and Limitations of Selected Response Items
Answered quickly Assess a large range of content on one test Inexpensive to score Results collected quickly Limitations Limited ability to reveal a student’s reasoning process Difficult to assess higher- order thinking skills Selected response items have many benefits. {+} Selected response items are designed to be answered within 1 or 2 minutes and allow the opportunity to assess a broad range of content in one test. Selected response items are objectively scored and student results are collected quickly. Despite these benefits, there are two limitations. With selected responses, it is difficult to understand a student’s reasoning process and to assess higher-order thinking skills.

27 ELA Grade 3 Selected Response Item
Stimulus Text: Birds Make Good Pets There are many reasons why people keep birds as pets. Canaries sing beautiful songs. Parakeets will sit on your shoulder. Parrots can talk to you. Birds fly outdoors. Pet birds can be fun. ELA Grade 3 Selected Response Item Item Stem: A student is revising this paragraph and needs to take out information that does not support why birds make good pets. Which of the following sentences does not support why birds make good pets? Options: A. “Canaries sing beautiful songs.” B. “Parakeets will sit on your shoulder.” C. “Parrots can talk to you.” D. “Birds fly outdoors.” All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem. Distractor Analysis: A. Incorrect: This sentence gives a reason why someone might want a bird as a pet. B. Incorrect: This sentence gives a reason why someone might want a bird as a pet. C. Incorrect: This sentence gives a reason why someone might want a bird as a pet. D. Correct: This sentence states a fact about

28 Math Grade 3 Selected Response Item
Below are two rectangles that are joined together. 1a. Yes No 1b. Yes No For numbers 1a–1d, choose Yes or No to indicate whether joining each rectangle to the existing two rectangles would total exactly 99 square feet. All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem. 1c. Yes No 1d. Yes No

29 ELA Grade 4 Selected Response Item
Stimulus Text: Read the paragraph and complete the task that follows it. As my family drove home last evening, the sun was going down. We were treated to a beautiful sunset! All around over our heads, the entire sky was pretty. In a few minutes the amazing show was over. The sun disappeared completely, and the brightly colored sky faded to dark gray as the night began. ELA Grade 4 Selected Response Item Item Stem: Revise the paragraph by choosing the phrase with the best descriptive detail to replace was pretty. Options: A. had a whole lot of bright colors mixed together B. shone because it was almost time for darkness C. glowed with astonishing shades of pink and gold D. looked different than it usually does during the day All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem. Distractor Analysis: A. This option makes grammatical and semantic sense as replacement for the phrase, but it contains only basic descriptive details. B. This option makes grammatical and semantic sense as replacement for the phrase, but gives a reason for the bright colors and not a precise description thereof. C. KEY: This phrase contains descriptive details about the beauty of the sky with a precise verb, an adjective of degree, and specific colors. D. This option makes grammatical and semantic sense as replacement for the phrase, but provides a comparison to the daytime color and not a precise description.

30 Math Grade 4 Selected Response Item
Which number is both a factor of 100 and a multiple of 5? 4 40 50 500 A B C D All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem. Key and Distractor Analysis: A Did not consider criteria of “multiple of 5” B Did not consider criteria of “factor of 100” C Correct D Multiplied 100 and 5

31 ELA Grade 5 Selected Response Item
Stimulus Text: Read this text and then answer the question. Animals on the Move A good way to learn about animals is to track them from space. Scientists pick individual animals and fit them with lightweight, comfortable radio transmitters. Signals from the transmitters are received by special instruments on certain satellites as they pass overhead. These satellites are operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The polar orbits of the satellites let them see nearly every part of Earth as it rotates below and receive signals from thousands of migrating animals. After the satellite gets the signal from the animal's transmitter, it relays the information to a ground station. The ground station then sends the information to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. Goddard then sends the information about the animal to the scientists, wherever they may be. Tracking migrating animals using satellites may help us figure out how to make their journeys as safe as possible and help them survive. A flock of geese flies gracefully overhead. You wish you could see the world as they see it. You wish you could fly and be as free as they are. You wonder where they are going in such a hurry! Well, don't envy them too much, because they may be on a very long, tiring journey. Many geese and other birds migrate thousands of miles every year. Some travel over 7,000 miles one way! Some may travel up to 1000 miles without even a rest stop, crossing the Gulf of Mexico or the Sahara Desert. These birds must follow their food supply and they must return to certain locations to breed. They migrate to survive! Besides birds, some other long-distance travelers are fish, sea turtles, bears, caribou, whales, and porpoises. Some of these kinds of animals are shrinking in population. Some are in danger of disappearing forever. Scientists want to know what is happening to them and why. As part of the answer, they want to know where the animals go, how they get there, and how long they stay. All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem. Item Stem: Read this sentence in Paragraph 3. Scientists pick individual animals and fit them with lightweight, comfortable radio transmitters. Which set of words has the same meanings as the underlined words? Options: A. select, equip B. claim , connect C. examine, link D. determine , tame

32 Math Grade 5 Selected Response Item
All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem. Key: 1a. No 1b. Yes 1c. Yes 1d. No

33 ELA Grade 6 Selected Response Item
Stimulus Text: Read the following passage and then answer the question. Have you seen pictures of Uncle Sam? He is a skinny man with a long white beard and a top hat. He usually wears the colors of the American flag: red, white, and blue. He has been a symbol of the United States for about two hundred years. Some people think that there was actually a real Uncle Sam, named Samuel Wilson. He lived in Troy, New York, in the early 1800s, he ran a business that delivered meat to the United States Army. The meat was delivered in barrels stamped “U.S.” The “U.S.” stamp was to show that it belonged to the United States government. The people delivering the meat knew that it came from Sam Wilson. They joked to the soldiers that the “U.S.” on the meat barrels stood for “Uncle Sam.” The joke spread. Soon, all over the country, “Uncle Sam” became another way of saying “United States.” Item Stem: Select the correct way to revise the highlighted sentence. Options: A. He lived in Troy, New York, in the early 1800s. There he had ran a business that delivered meat to the United States Army. B. He lived in Troy, New York, in the early 1800s he ran a business that delivers meat to the United States Army. C. He lived in Troy, New York in the early 1800s, and he ran a business that delivered meat to the United States Army. D. In the early 1800s, Sam Wilson lived in Troy, New York, and ran a business that delivered meat to the United States Army. All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

34 Math Grade 6 Selected Response Item
All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

35 ELA Grade 7 Selected Response Item
Stimulus Text: Read the passage and complete the task that follows it. Orangutans When they are hungry, they can use sticks to open their favorite fruit. These great apes can make at least 13 different kinds of noises to send messages to other orangutans; they can also “talk” to each other by making signs with their hands. Orangutans can easily learn to use zippers and to open latches. From watching humans, some have even learned to wash clothes and paddle canoes! ELA Grade 7 Selected Response Item Item Stem: This paragraph about orangutans is missing a thesis statement. Select the most appropriate thesis statement to begin the paragraph. All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem. Options: A. I am going to tell you about orangutans and their skills. B. Orangutans are very intelligent animals. C. Orangutans are the monkeys most like humans. D. Orangutans like to do many interesting things.

36 Math Grade 7 Selected Response Item
All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

37 ELA Grade 8 Selected Response Item
Stimulus Text: Below is a text about Native Americans. Read the text and answer the question that follows. Native Americans Archaeologists suggest that people arrived in several groups or tribes to America, from at least 15,000 years ago. The first Americans came from Asia and followed herds of grazing animals across a land bridge formed during the Ice Age. When the Earth began to warm, this land bridge disappeared and became the Bering Strait. The people journeyed on foot slowly southward into North America through a harsh landscape. They were excellent hunters and speared huge animals such as woolly mammoths and long-horned bison. ELA Grade 8 Selected Response Item Item Stem: Which statement from the text shows how Native Americans survived in North America? All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem. Options: A. “people arrived in several groups” B. “the Earth began to warm” C. “The people journeyed on foot slowly” D. “They were excellent hunters”

38 Math Grade 8 Selected Response Item
All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

39 Purpose of Constructed Response Items
Address assessment targets and claims that are of greater complexity Require more analytical thinking and reasoning Constructed response items are brief open-response items that focus on a particular skill or concept and require students to produce a short written response. Constructed response items address assessment targets and claims that are of greater complexity, requiring more analytical thinking and reasoning than a selected response can elicit.

40 Administration of Constructed Response Items
Administered during the computer-adaptive component Scored using artificial intelligence Most constructed response items take between 1 and 5 minutes to complete Some more complex items may take up to 10 minutes to complete Unlike Performance Tasks, which are the topic of another module, {+} constructed response items are designed to be administered during the computer-adaptive component of the assessment. {+} In order to score constructed response items quickly, automated scoring using artificial intelligence will be employed. {+} Most constructed response items should take between 1 and 5 minutes to complete. {+} Some more complex items may take up to 10 minutes to complete.

41 ELA Grade 3 Constructed Response Item
Stimulus Text: Read the paragraph and complete the task that follows it. Children should choose their own bedtime. There are things to do, and most have homework. Some people need more sleep, but children like talking to friends. The time to go to bed should be children’s decision when they are tired they go to bed earlier. There are activities to go to, so children learn to be responsible. ELA Grade 3 Constructed Response Item Item Prompt: Rewrite the paragraph by organizing it correctly and adding ideas that support the opinion that is given. Sample Responses: 3 I think children should be allowed to choose their own bedtime. Children need a way to learn how to be responsible. Picking a bedtime is a good way to become more responsible. Children should think about the activities they have to do and how much homework they have when deciding what time to go to bed. Thinking about these things when deciding on a bedtime shows responsibility. Also, some people need more sleep than others, so this is something children can think about when they choose a bedtime. Making good choices helps children to be more responsible. 2 Children should be allowed to pick a bedtime depending on how much homework and how many activities they have to do. Kids have a lot to do, but they have to learn how to be responsible for themselves. When kids choose their own bedtime, they can decide based on how much sleep they need. 1 I think children should pick a bedtime depending on how much homework they have. When the kids have no homework, they should be able to stay up as late as they want. That way they can talk to their friends and enjoy activities. I usually go to bed at 9:00, after I watch my favorite shows. All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

42 Math Grade 3 Constructed Response Item
Ms. Clancy uses a backpack on a hiking trip. She took about 2 kg of food out of her backpack to make it lighter. The scale below shows how much the backpack weighed after she took out the food. All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem. How much did the backpack weigh, in kg, before she took the food out? kg

43 ELA Grade 4 Constructed Response Item
Stimulus Text: Below is part of a poem about leaves and a story about a robin. Read the two texts and think about how they are similar and then answer the question that follows. Item Prompt: Compare how the actions of the leaves are similar to the actions of the little robin. Use details from both texts to explain similarities. ELA Grade 4 Constructed Response Item How the Leaves Came Down I'll tell you how the leaves came down. The great Tree to his children said, "You're getting sleepy, Yellow and Brown, Yes, very sleepy, little Red; It is quite time you went to bed." "Ah!" begged each silly, pouting leaf, "Let us a little longer stay; Dear Father Tree, behold our grief, 'Tis such a very pleasant day We do not want to go away." So, just for one more merry day To the great Tree the leaflets clung, Frolicked and danced and had their way, Upon the autumn breezes swung, Whispering all their sports among, "Perhaps the great Tree will forget And let us stay until the spring If we all beg and coax and fret." But the great Tree did no such thing; He smiled to hear their whispering. The Little Captive One day Bessie’s mother said to her that she must open the cage, and let the bird fly away. “No, no mother!” said Bessie, “don’t say so. I take such comfort in him, I can’t let him go.” But the next moment she remembered how unhappy it made her to disobey her mother; and, taking down the cage, she opened the door. To her great surprise, her little captive did not care to take the freedom offered him. After a while he seemed to understand that he was expected to come out of the cage; and what do you think was the first thing that the little bird did? Why, he lighted right on Bessie’s shoulder, as if he hated to leave her. Bessie was pleased enough to see him so tame. She took him in her hand, and, carrying him to the window, held him out until he soared away into the air. But he did not forget his adopted home; for the next day, while Bessie was at dinner, she heard a flutter of wings, and again the bird perched upon her shoulder. After pecking some crumbs from the table-cloth, away he flew again out of the window. But, my dear little friends, you will be surprised when I tell you that day after day, for two or three weeks, that little robin made a visit to Bessie’s house. All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

44 Math Grade 4 Constructed Response Item
Spencer uses his hand to measure different lengths. He knows that the length of his hand is 6 inches, as shown below. The table below shows the total number of hand lengths that Spencer used to measure each object. Measuring Objects Object Number of Hand Lengths Number of Inches Number of Feet Computer Monitor 4 Picture Frame 6 Classroom Door 16 Complete the table above. Click in a box and then type the correct number of inches or feet for each number of Spencer’s hand lengths. All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem. Use Spencer’s measurement to identify each object below that has a length that is greater than 1 yard. Computer Monitor Picture Frame Classroom Door

45 ELA Grade 5 Constructed Response Item
Stimulus Text: The Peaches A farmer bought five peaches. He gave one to his wife and one to each of his four sons. The next day, he asked his sons what they had done with their peaches. The oldest son told him that he planted the seed of the peach in the ground to grow a peach tree. The second son told his father that he sold his peach so he could buy more. The youngest son told his father that he ate his peach and half of his mother’s, too. The third son told his father that he gave his peach to a sick neighbor. The father told his sons that one of them used his peach in the best way. ELA Grade 5 Constructed Response Item Item Prompt: Rewrite the story by adding dialogue, descriptive details, and a conclusion without changing the events or characters. All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

46 Math Grade 5 Constructed Response Item
Classify each shape according to its sides and angles. All shapes must be placed in at least one box. • If a shape isn’t a square, rectangle, rhombus, or parallelogram, then place it in the box labeled “Other.” • If a shape meets the properties of more than one category, it must be placed into the boxes of all the types of shapes it can be classified as. All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

47 ELA Grade 6 Constructed Response Item
Stimulus Text: The following excerpt comes from Gary Soto’s novel Summer on Wheels. Bentley sat at the kitchen table running an ice cube back and forth across the knot on his forehead. The knot was like a speed bump. The ice cube glided across smooth skin before it jumped up and over the knot. Bentley whimpered like the puppy he was. He had flown over the handlebars and not only hurt his head, but also scraped his elbows and chin. And the air left his lungs when he belly flopped. It took a full minute before he could get enough air back into his system to complain, “Golly, that smarted.” ELA Grade 6 Constructed Response Item Item Prompt: The highlighted sentence from Summer on Wheels includes a literary device. • What does the literary device used mean? • Why did the author most likely select the literary device for this description? Write a 2–3 sentence answer responding to these questions. Interpret figurative language use (e.g., personification, metaphor), literary devices, or connotative meanings of words and phrases used in context and their impact on reader interpretation. All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

48 Math Grade 6 Constructed Response Item
All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

49 ELA Grade 7 Constructed Response Item
Stimulus Text: In the following passage from Jamaica Kincaid’s novel Annie John, the narrator describes her first morning at a new school, as she watches the other students. from Annie John by Jamaica Kincaid When I looked at them, they made up a sea. They were walking in and out among the beds of flowers, all across the fields, all across the courtyard, in and out of classrooms. Except for me, no one seemed a stranger to anything or anyone. Hearing the way they greeted each other, I couldn’t be sure that they hadn’t all come out of the same woman’s belly, and at the same time, too. Looking at them, I was suddenly glad that because I had wanted to avoid an argument with my mother I had eaten all my breakfast, for now I surely would have fainted if I had been in any more weakened a condition. All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem. Item Prompt: Summarize in your own words the way Annie John feels during her first morning at school. Support your answer with details from the passage.

50 Math Grade 7 Constructed Response Item
All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

51 ELA Grade 8 Constructed Response Item
Stimulus Text: Italy By Charlotte Mary Yonge I am going to tell you next about the most famous nation in the world. Going westward from Greece another peninsula stretches down into the Mediterranean. The Apennine Mountains run like a limb stretching out of the Alps to the south eastward, and on them seems formed that land, shaped somewhat like a leg, which is called Italy. Round the streams that flowed down from these hills, valleys of fertile soil formed themselves, and a great many different tribes and people took up their abode there, before there was any history to explain their coming. Putting together what can be proved about them, it is plain, however, that most of them came of that old stock from which the Greeks descended, and they spoke a language which had the same root as modern English and as the Greek. From one of these nations the best known form of this, as it was polished in later times, was called Latin, from the tribe who spoke it. All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem. Item Prompt: The author uses the phrase “polished in later time” to describe the Latin language. Use information from the text to explain what this phrase reveals about the history of Italy presented in] the text.

52 Math Grade 8 Constructed Response Item
All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

53 Technology-Enhanced Items
Specialized interaction May have digital media for stimulus Same requirements as selected and constructed response items Students manipulate information Defined responses Technology-enhanced items are computer delivered items that require {+} specialized interactions students must perform to produce a response. Responses produced by a technology-enhanced item require students to do something other than write text or select from among a set of options. These items may also include digital media as the stimulus. Technology-enhanced items should conform to the same essential requirements that have already been discussed for writing quality selected response and constructed response items. The only difference is that they allow students to manipulate information in ways that are not possible with traditional selected response and constructed response items. Like selected-response items, technology-enhanced items have defined responses that can be scored in an automated manner.

54 Technology-Enhanced Items
Digital Media Video Animation Sound Response Types Selected Response Constructed Response Example: Listen to President Kennedy’s 1961 inaugural address and then write an essay analyzing metaphors used regarding foreign policy. Technology-enabled items use {+} digital media as the stimulus, but do not require specialized interactions to produce response. Possible stimuli for English Language Arts technology-enabled items could include short video clips, audio recordings of lectures or speeches, or dramatic readings of prose or poetry. {+} Despite the use of these media types, a technology enabled item requires a student to provide either a selected response or a constructed response that consists of text. An English language arts technology-enabled item might require students to listen to President Kennedy’s 1961 inaugural address and answer a constructed response item analyzing the metaphors he uses regarding foreign policy. Another possible item might have students view a brief video about the proper way to brush and floss your teeth and then write a summary explaining the steps. For ELA assessments, most technology enabled items will be part of performance tasks that use non-text stimuli and Claim 3 items that involve listening to and/or viewing a stimulus. Example: View video and write a summary explaining steps in a process.

55 Key Components of a Technology-Enhanced Item
INTERACTION SPACE Remember When you can no more hold me by the hand, Nor I half turn to go yet turning stay. Remember me when no more day by day You tell me of our future that you plann’d: Only remember me; you understand It will be late to counsel then or pray. Yet if you should forget me for a while And afterwards remember, do not grieve. For if the darkness and corruption leave A vestige* of the thoughts that once I had Better by far you should forget and smile Than that you should remember and be sad. The notes for a summary need to be arranged correctly in the order in which the events occurred in the passage. Click on each sentence and move it to arrange the sentence into correct chronological order. Summary of Events: Maria laughs with the old women. The guest and family eat dinner. Maria’s mother asks the guests for a story. Maria’s guests arrive. Maria becomes sad. The guests take turn telling stories. There are several terms that are important to understand when developing technology enhanced items. The first term is Interaction Space. The interaction space is the area in which students interact with an item to produce a response. {+} This is the interaction spaces for an item that presents students with a poem and asks them to select blocks of text within the poem. The interaction space is the area in which students select text blocks. This is a different item that presented a passage and is now asking students to order sentences that describe events in the passage. The interaction space allows students to select the sentences and then change their order.

56 Technology-Enhanced Item Types
Common English Language Arts Technology- Enhanced item types Dropdowns Classification Reorder text Select and order Select text Below is a poem, a sonnet, in which the speaker discusses her feelings about a relationship. Read the poem and answer the question that follows. Remember When you can no more hold me by the hand, Nor I half turn to go yet turning stay. Remember me when no more day by day You tell me of our future that you plann’d: Only remember me; you understand It will be late to counsel then or pray. Yet if you should forget me for a while And afterwards remember, do not grieve. For if the darkness and corruption leave A vestige* of the thoughts that once I had Better by far you should forget and smile Than that you should remember and be sad. *vestige: a mark, trace, or visible evidence of something that is no longer present or evident. In the sonnet “Remember,” which two lines reveals a change in the speaker’s message to her subject? The notes for a summary need to be arranged correctly in the order in which the events occurred in the passage. Click on each sentence and move it to arrange the sentence into correct chronological order. Summary of Events: Maria laughs with the old women. The guest and family eat dinner. Maria’s mother asks the guests for a story. Maria’s guests arrive. Maria becomes sad. The guests take turn telling stories. Classify each word below based on whether it is a verb or a noun. Verbs Nouns Doll Run Dog Swim Eat There are many different types of technology-enhanced item types that can be used to write an item. {+} Most ELA items will use one of the following types; dropdowns, classification, reorder text, select and order, and select text. As just three examples, the TEI poem item discussed earlier is an example of a select text item. Students selected a block of text from a poem as their answer. The item that asked students to order events in a story is an example of a reorder text item. And the item asking students to classify words as verbs or nouns is an example of a classification item. Additional examples are available in the Technology-Enhanced Item specifications.

57 Math Grade 3 Technology Enhanced Item
4 6 Shade of the rectangle below. Use the line tool to divide the rectangle by creating horizontal and vertical lines. Sample Top Score Response: All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

58 Math Grade 4 Technology Enhanced Item
Draw a line of symmetry through the figure below. Click on an intersection of grid lines to make the first point on the line. To make the second point, move the pointer and click on a different intersection of gridlines. The line will automatically be drawn between the two points. If you make a mistake, click on the Clear button. Sample Top Score Response: All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

59 Math Grade 5 Technology Enhanced Item
All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

60 ELA Grade 6 Technology Enhanced Item
Stimulus Text: Sojourner Truth The following passage is about the African-American activist Sojourner Truth, who lived in the 1800s. Perhaps it was her dignity, or her sincerity, or that mighty voice, but when Sojourner Truth spoke people listened. Across her chest she wore a banner that said, PROCLAIM LIBERTY THROUGHOUT ALL THE LAND UNTO ALL THE INHABITANTS THEREOF. Those words from the Bible are written on the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia. Sojourner Truth soon became famous. Harriet Beecher Stowe, a well-known writer, was her friend, and Abraham Lincoln invited her to the White House. She spoke out against injustice, wherever she found it. She worked for women’s rights, black rights, prison reform, and temperance. Once, a man tried to make fun of her, saying, “I don’t care any more for your talk than I do for the bite of a flea.” Sojourner Truth chuckled as she replied, “Maybe not, but the Lord willing, just like the flea, I’ll keep you scratching.” Nineteenth-century women did keep people scratching. They were working in factories, speaking in public, writing for newspapers, and fighting for causes they believed in. All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem. Item Stem: Read the statement below, and then answer the question that follows it. “Joy Hakim, the author of this passage, admires Sojourner Truth for her ability to change peoples’ ideas.” How can you tell that the above statement is true? Click on a sentence in the passage that could be used as evidence to support this statement.

61 ELA Grade 6 Technology Enhanced Item
All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

62 Math Grade 6 Technology Enhanced Item
All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

63 Math Grade 7 Technology Enhanced Item
All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

64 ELA Grade 8 Technology Enhanced Item
Stimulus Text: Below is a poem, a sonnet, in which the speaker discusses her feelings about a relationship. Read the poem and answer the question that follows. Remember by Christina Rossetti Remember me when I am gone away, Gone far away into the silent land; When you can no more hold me by the hand, Nor I half turn to go yet turning stay. Remember me when no more day by day You tell me of our future that you plann'd: Only remember me; you understand It will be late to counsel then or pray. Yet if you should forget me for a while And afterwards remember, do not grieve: For if the darkness and corruption leave A vestige* of the thoughts that once I had, Better by far you should forget and smile Than that you should remember and be sad. *vestige: a mark, trace, or visible evidence of something that is no longer present or evident. ELA Grade 8 Technology Enhanced Item Item Stem: In the sonnet “Remember,” which two lines reveals a change in the speaker’s message to the one she loves? All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

65 Math Grade 8 Technology Enhanced Item
All constructed response items are worth 2 to 4 points. {+} Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructed response item. Like selected response items, Constructed response items have a stimulus and a stem.

66 ELA Performance Tasks

67 ELA Grade 3 Performance Task
Task Overview (105 total minutes): Title: Visiting the Dentist Part 1 (35 minutes): Ultimately tasked with writing an informational essay telling how to maintain good dental health, students will be introduced to the topic through watching a short video and reading two articles, taking notes on these sources. They will then respond to three constructed-response questions addressing the research skills of analyzing and evaluating information. Part 2 (70 minutes): Finally, students will work individually to compose a full-length informational essay telling how to maintain good dental health, referring to details from the video or the texts. Students may also refer to their notes or back to the video or passages as needed. Pre-writing, drafting and revising will be involved. Scorable Products Student responses to the constructed-response questions at the end of part 1 and the essay completed in part 2 will be scored.

68 ELA Grade 4 Performance Task
Task Overview (105 total minutes): Title: Civil War Quilts Part 1 (35 minutes) Ultimately tasked with writing an informative essay on Civil War quilts, students will read articles and view a video and several photographs, taking notes on these sources. They will then respond to three constructed-response questions addressing the research skills of analyzing and evaluating information. Part 2 (70 minutes) Students will work individually on drafting, composing, and revising an informative essay about Civil War quilts. Students may use their notes to help plan their essay. Pre-writing, drafting, and revising will be involved. Scorable Products Student responses

69 ELA Grade 5 Performance Task
Task Overview: Title: Pollution on Land and in Space Part 1 (35 minutes) Before writing an essay comparing the problem of pollution on Earth to the problem of pollution in space, students will be introduced to the topic through watching a short video, reading two informative texts, and answering research questions on the topic. Students may take notes on what they view and read. Students should also have access to the video and texts throughout the performance task. After watching and reading, students will then respond individually to selected-response items and constructed-response items. Part 2 (70 minutes) Finally, students will work individually to compose a full-length informational essay comparing the problem of pollution on Earth to the problem of pollution in space, referring to details from the video or the texts. Students may also refer to their notes or back to the video or passages as needed. Drafting and revising will be involved. Scorable Products Student responses to the selected-response and constructed-response questions in part 1 and the essay in part 2 will be scored.

70 ELA Grade 6 Performance Task
Task Overview (105 total minutes) Title: Young Wonders Part 1 (35 minutes) Students plan and research for their speeches. They research a word meaning and apply the definition to a concept. They watch and analyze a video clip and read an interview about the altruistic acts of two young people. They analyze three websites to identify which would be most useful for researching another young wonder. They research a third young person that helps others and take notes on the information about that person. Part 2 (70 minutes) Students write an outline about the young wonder they researched to plan their speeches. They create or select a visual or audio representation of the young wonder they researched. They give a speech about the young wonder using the visual or audio representation to support the speech and explaining how the representation is relevant to the young wonder. Scorable Products Student responses to the constructed-response questions and the essay will be scored.

71 ELA Grade 7 Performance Task
Task Overview (105 total minutes) Title: Narrating History Part 1 (35 minutes) Ultimately tasked with writing an historical narrative, students will read an article and two stories and view a video, taking notes on these sources. They will then respond to three constructed-response questions addressing the research skills of analyzing and evaluating information. Part 2 (70 minutes) Students will work individually to compose full-length historical narratives, referring to their notes as needed. Pre-writing, drafting, and revising will be involved. Scorable Products Student responses to the constructed-response questions and the narrative will be scored.

72 ELA Grade 8 Performance Task
Task Overview (105 total minutes) Title: Positive Digital Footprint Part 1 (35 minutes) Students will watch a video introducing the idea of positive digital footprints and explaining why they are important in today’s world. They will also read an article about using social networking tools, such as Facebook, to build a positive digital footprint and excerpts from a blog as an example of how one student has created a positive footprint. They will then respond to three constructed-response questions addressing the research skills of analyzing and evaluating information. Part 2 (70 minutes) Students will work individually to compose full-length informational essays on the benefits of creating a positive digital footprint and the different ways to accomplish this. Pre-writing, drafting, and revising will be involved. Scorable Products: Student responses to the constructed-response questions and the essay will be scored.

73 Math Performance Tasks

74 Math Grade 3 Performance Task
Task Overview: Modeling & Data Analysis Students collect and analyze data in order to determine total cost of school-wide tool kits in comparison to budgets. Students are asked to gather and organize data, graph the data, and use the data to solve real-world scenarios. Students will use this information from graphs to justify a conclusion. Teacher Survey Directions: For each tool kit, circle the top five tools, based on usefulness for the class, that you believe should be in each teacher’s tool kit. Please return your survey to ______________ by __________. Math Tool Kit Science Tool Clock Place Value Blocks Calculator Pattern Blocks Fraction Set Coins Tangrams Thermometers Beakers Safety Goggles Tape Measure Magnets Magnifying Lens Compass

75 Math Grade 4 Performance Task
Example 1 Task Overview: Measurement and Data The student assumes the role of a grocery store manager opening a new store. In a group and individually, the student completes tasks that lead up to the opening of the store. The student uses content from the domains of measurement and data, numbers and operations in base ten, and operations and algebraic thinking to accomplish these tasks. Example 2 Task Overview: Modeling & Data Analysis Students are asked to develop various features of a robot given specific guidelines that must be followed.

76 Math Grade 5 Performance Task
Example 1 Task Overview: Numbers and Operations in Base Ten The student uses concepts of number and operations in base ten and fractions to accomplish tasks required of a committee member as part of planning an end of the year festival. The work is supported by calculations and explanations of reasoning. Example 2 Task Overview: Measurement and Data Students must perform various calculations in order to find the lowest cost for a specified amount of volume using fixed storage space dimensions. The student uses problem-solving strategies to organize the area of rectangles within a given amount of space. The student uses numeric operations to find the volume of rectangular prisms, the monthly cost, and the average cost per unit. The student justifies why the original mathematical model is insufficient and makes improvements given the original data. Finally, the student uses problem-solving strategies based upon the new data he/she created to answer various mathematical concepts.

77 Math Grade 6 Performance Task
Example 1 Task Overview: Rations and Proportional Relationships Students must calculate various ratios and proportions when constructing a beaded bracelet and necklace. Additionally, students must perform calculations to determine the cost of the items and the possible amount of profit, given certain criteria. Example 2 Task Overview: Expressions and Equations Students must work through various calculations in order to find the best deal, area, perimeter, and volume of each garden.

78 Math Grade 7 Performance Task
Example 1 Task Overview: Geometry The student will use the content for the domains of geometry, ratios and proportional relationships, and measurement and data to explore methods for remodeling a bedroom. The student will use the content for the domains of geometry, ratios and proportional relationships, and measurement and data to make a scale drawing. Example 2 Task Overview: Expressions and Equations A school must choose among three plans for a fundraiser to buy new books for the library. The student will evaluate a variety of information, claims, and projections to help choose a plan for the fundraiser. Example 3 Task Overview: Statistics and Probability The student is introduced to 2010 census data regarding the amount of time workers take to get to their jobs. The student or a group of students gather(s) data from the community regarding this topic. The student will create data displays (histogram and box plot) and use these displays to answer questions. The student converts the data to percentages in order to compare community times versus national times. The student will use this information to answer a series of questions. The student will use content knowledge of statistics and probability, as well as ratios and proportional relationships to complete these tasks.

79 Math Grade 8 Performance Task
Task Overview The student must use information derived from research to estimate the costs to adopt and maintain a pet. This work will be supported by the use of calculations, graphical representation of data, and generalizations using algebra. Prework: In groups or as a whole class, students brainstorm what items are needed to maintain a pet over time. Day 1: With partners, students decide which type of pet they want to adopt. Students use a set of provided “Web sites” to look up the costs of necessary items for the chosen pet. Day 2: Students individually estimate the cost of adopting and maintaining their chosen pet for 1 year. Students explain why their estimate is reasonable. As part of the explanation, the student must make and refer to a line graph showing the monthly increase in money spent over the year.

80 Math Grade 8 Performance Task
Task Overview During the task, the student assumes the role of a member of the finance committee of a town council who is given the responsibility of determining the best plan for constructing a water tank or tower for the town. The student completes tasks in which he or she investigates the costs associated with building the water tank or tower in different locations, as well as the costs associated with the different designs, and then combines this information with some survey data to make a recommendation to the council. This investigation is done in class using spreadsheets and a calculator.

81 For Further Information
California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress CAASPP Office CDE Smarter Balanced Field Test Web Page Smarter Balanced Technology Readiness Tool (TRT) California Technical Assistance Center


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