Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Materials design and lesson planning: Poetry Literature and Language Teaching (Ch. 6) Lazar Gillian Presenter: Betty Hsu.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Materials design and lesson planning: Poetry Literature and Language Teaching (Ch. 6) Lazar Gillian Presenter: Betty Hsu."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Materials design and lesson planning: Poetry Literature and Language Teaching (Ch. 6) Lazar Gillian Presenter: Betty Hsu

3 Putting a poem back ( Jigsaw puzzle ) 1. and molly was chased by a horrible thing 2. so sweetly she couldn’t remember her troubles,and 3. went down to the beach (to play one day) 4. may came home with a smooth round stone 5. which raced sideways while blowing bubbles:and 6. it’s always ourselves we find in the sea 7. maggie and milly and molly and may 8. and maggie discovered a shell that sang 9. milly befriended a stranded star 10. For whatever we lose(like a you or a me) 11. as small as a world and as large as alone. 12. whose rays five languid fingers were;

4 Putting a poem back together again maggie and milly and molly and may7 went down to the beach (to play one day)3 and maggie discovered a shell that sang8 so sweetly she couldn’t remember her troubles,and2 milly befriended a stranded star9 whose rays five languid fingers were;12 and molly was chased by a horrible thing 1 which raced sideways while blowing bubbles:and5 may came home with a smooth round stone4 as small as a world and as large as alone.11 For whatever we lose(like a you or a me)10 it’s always ourselves we find in the sea 6 Ans: 7,3,8,2,9,12,1,5,4,11,10,6

5 How to put a poem back  Jumble Up & Reorder  Structure of Poetry Identify the characters and the setting maggie and milly and molly and may went down to the beach (to play one day) Identify the discoursal features, collocational link and maggie discovered a shell that sang so sweetly she couldn’t remember her

6 Why NOT use poetry in class I’ve got a very demanding syllabus to get through, so there’s no real time for playing around with poetry in my lessons. My students don’t read poetry in their own language, so how can they possibly read it in English? I’ve tried using a poem with students, but they found it difficult to understand, and just wanted me to give them the “right” interpretation of what it meant. I sometimes wonder if I’ve really understood the meaning of a poem myself; it’s a bit daunting then to explain it to a group of students.

7 Why USE poetry in class Poetry is characterized as deviating from the norms of language, but it is communicated with the reader in a fresh, original way Exploit the unusual use of language as a basis for expanding the student’s language awareness Poetic uses of language will reinforce the students’ knowledge of the norms f language use Poetry is rich in words, students can be trained to guess and check their meanings by using a dictionary Identify certain lexical or grammatical features of a poem to increase student’s awareness of those linguistic features

8 HOW to use poetry in class Choose poems suitably graded to the level of the students Give students as much help as possible in understanding the language of the poem Devise activities which gently lead students towards making interpretations of their own Encourage students to make use of certain interpretative strategies while reading, e.g. speculaing about the symbolic meaning of key words Interpretation of a poem varies form reader to reader; never degenerate poetry learning into a sterile linguistic exercise

9 What is distinctive about poetry Please look at the extracts taken from different poems to decide…..  What is distinctive about the language?  How poetry can be of value to English learners?

10 Kangaroo Delicate mother Kangaroo Sitting up there rabbit-wise, but huge, plump-weighted, And lifting her beautiful slender face, oh! so much more gently and finely lined than a rabbit's, or than a hare's, Lifting her face to nibble at a round white peppermint drop which she loves, sensitive mother Kangaroo. David Herbert Lawrence ( )

11 The Visionary Silent is the house: all are laid asleep: One alone looks out o’er the snow- wreaths deep, Watching every cloud, dreading every breeze That whirls the wildering drift, and bends the groaning trees. Emily Jane Brontë ( )

12 Lessons of the War: 1. Naming of Parts’ Henry Reed (1914 – 1986) Today we have naming of parts. Yesterday We had daily cleaning. And tomorrow morning, We shall have what to do after firing. But today, Today we have naming of parts. Japonica Glistens like coral in all of the neighbouring gardens, And today we have naming of parts.

13 A Birthday (Christina Georgina Rossetti ) My heart is like a singing bird Whose nest is in a water'd shoot; My heart is like an apple-tree Whose boughs are bent with thickset fruit; My heart is like a rainbow shell That paddles in a halcyon sea; My heart is gladder than all these Because my love is come to me.

14 What is distinctive about poetry We saw that POETRY  Reorganizes syntax  Invents its own vocabulary  Freely mixes registers  Creates its own punctuation  Generates vivid new metaphors  Patterns sounds and orders rhythms All these linguistic devices have important implications for the use of poetry in the language classroom

15 Autobahnmotorwayautoroute Around the gleaming map of Europe A gigantic wedding ring Slowly revolves through Londonoslowestberlin Athensromemadridparis and home again, Slowly revolving. That's no ring, It's the great European Limousine, The Famous Goldenwhite Circular Car Slowly revolving All the cars in Europe have been welded together Into a mortal unity, A roundaboutgrandtourroundabout Trafficjamroundaboutagain, All the cars melted together, Citroenjaguarbugattivolkswagenporschedaf. Each passenger, lugging his Colourpiano, frozenmagazines, high-fidog, Clambers over the seat in front of him Towards what looks like the front of the car. They are dragging behind them Worksofart, lampshades made of human money, Instant children and exploding clocks. But the car's a circle No front no back No driver no steering wheel no windscreen no brakes no

16 Exploiting unusual language features Activity 1 Around the gleaming map of Europe A gigantic wedding ring Slowly revolves through Londonoslowestberlin Athensromemadridparis and home again, Slowly revolving. 1. Ask students to punctuate the first verse as they think appropriate, e.g. with commas between the names of the cities 2. Compare it with the original one and think about the effect 3. Find other examples in the poem

17 Exploiting unusual language features Activity 2 Each passenger, lugging his Colourpiano, frozenmagazines, high-fidog, Clambers over the seat in front of him Towards what looks like the front of the car. They are dragging behind them Worksofart, lampshades made of human money, Instant children and exploding clocks. Frozen Instant Color 1. Ask students to match the adj. with the nous in the box 2. Find any examples of the formed combination from the poem 3. Think about the effect it creates coffeeillustrationsmagazinesfoodmilk souptelevisionchickenpicturesphotos

18 Possible Activities Design activities to exploit the unusual language features of the poem  Compare the punctuation What effect is created by the layout and punctuation used in the poem?  Compare the combination of adjective and a noun What effect does the poet create by using the adj. & noun combination? Procedure: 1. Analysis the unusual linguistic features of a poem 2. Devise activities to exploit these features 3. Help students to understand the historical or cultural background of the poem 4. Help students to grap with the underlying meaning, and the theme of the poem

19 Helping students with figurative meaning  Many poems are rich in metaphors or figurative uses of language  Help students to decipher the multiple ambiguities of metaphorical language and make them enjoy it  Find out the metaphor embedded in the following examples

20 Helping students with figurative meaning  Many poems are rich in metaphors or figurative uses of language  Help students to decipher the multiple ambiguities of metaphorical language and make them enjoy it  Find out the metaphor embedded in the following examples

21 Evening She sweeps with many-colored brooms, And leaves the shreds behind; Oh, housewife in the evening west, Come back, and dust the pond! Emily Dickinson ( ) A housewife v.s. The Sunset

22 The gulls’ flight The gulls’flight is low flat &hard they go to sea to the edge Where the day’s fire is lit they go as shiftworkers to the dawn. Nigel Roberts (b.1941) The day’s fire v.s. The Sun

23 Stopping by woods on a snowy evening (Robert Frost) These woods are lovely, dark, and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep. The woods v.s. a journey Robert Frost

24 The problem with metaphors  Metaphor defined as a connection or comparison made between things which are usually considered to be unlike each other  Understanding metaphors involves engaging in a series of linguistic inferences, which may be problematic to students, e.g. days fire stands for the Sun because of the common qualities of brightness and warmth.  A lot of devices can be used to help students to come to grips with the metaphorical/figurative meanings in the poems (e.g. pair or group works / cloze exercise)

25 Using poetry with lower levels  Example: He Threats Them to Ice-Cream 1 Your are going to read a poem called “He Treats them to Ice-cream” by Anna Swirszcsynski. What does the verb “to treat” mean here? Write down what you think the poem is about. Talk about your ideas to your partner.

26 Example: He Threats Them to Ice-Cream 2. Now read the first verse of the poem. After you have read it, write down what you think happens next. Read this aloud to your class. Every Sunday they went for a walk together. He, she And the three children

27 Example: He Threats Them to Ice-Cream 3. Now read the next verse of the poem: One night when she tried to stop him going to his other woman he pulled out a flick-knife from under the mattress Were you right about what happened next in the poem? Now write a last verse for this poem, and read it aloud to the class.

28 Example: He Threats Them to Ice-Cream 4. Here is the last verse of the poem. They still go for a walk Every Sunday, He, she and the three children. He treats them to ice-cream and they all laugh. She too. Does it have the kind of ending you expected? What do you think of the ending?

29 Example: He Threats Them to Ice-Cream 5. Look at the title of the poem again: “He Threats Them to Ice-Cream”. Then look at the definitions for the word to treat Treat 1. to handle, deal with, or manage 2. to behave or act toward 3. to cause to undergo a process for a special purpose 4. to pay the cost of entertainment for 5. to deal with for some desired result. 6. to regard, consider How many different meanings does it have? Do you think any of these other meanings are connected with the poem?

30 Using poetry with lower levels  Types of Activities 1.Sentence completion 2.Matching words to definitions 3.Predicting writing 4.Ordering sentences in the correct sequence 5.Writing your own poem 6.Gap-fill/cloze 7.Matching words to pictures 8.Checking word meaning in a dictionary 9.Organizing words according to lexical relationships

31 Using poetry to develop oral skills Poetry is also rich in patterns of sound. Teacher should make these sound patterns be fully enjoyed and appreciated by students.

32 Using poetry to develop oral skills Choral Reading 1 The squares on the words show which words students have to stress or emphasize. The meaning of sentences changes according to where they put the stress. Make students sensitized to how stressing different words conveys different meanings.

33 Choral Reading 2: movement + gestures + beating out rhythms to the poem

34 Using poetry with higher levels  Types of Activities 1.Sentence completion 2.Matching words to definitions 3.Predicting writing 4.Ordering sentences in the correct sequence 5.Writing your own poem 6.Gap-fill/cloze 7.Matching words to pictures 8.Checking word meaning in a dictionary 9.Organizing words according to lexical relationships

35 London I wandered through each chartered street, Near where the chartered Thames does flow, A mark in every face I meet, Marks of weakness, marks of woe. In every cry of every man, In every infant's cry of fear, In every voice, in every ban, The mind-forged manacles I hear: How the chimney-sweeper's cry Every blackening church appals, And the hapless soldier's sigh Runs in blood down palace-walls. But most, through midnight streets I hear How the youthful harlot's curse Blasts the new-born infant's tear, And blights with plagues the marriage-hearse. William Blake ( )

36 Difficulties for advanced students reading ‘London’  Understanding individual words in the poem  Understanding the metaphorical/symbolic meaning behind phrases or lines in the poem  Understanding the historical context which forms the background to the text  Understanding the poet’s attitude to what he sees around him  Responding personally to the themes of the poem  Feeling threatened or intimidated by the apparent level of difficulty of the poem

37 Stages in a lesson using ‘London’ p,127

38 Anticipating student problems  The background to the poem Any cultural or historical information? The author’s life or other works?  The language of the poem Any unfamiliar words, grammatical, syntactic or discoursal features? Any ambiguities in meaning? Any figurative or symbolic meanings? Any aural or musical qualities in the poem?  Motivating and involving students How can the topic be made relevant to the student’s experience? How does the poem mesh with the syllabus requirements? What activities will most suit the learning styles of the students?

39 Further tasks and activities Pre- reading While- reading Post- reading Further Follow-up  Stimulating student interest in the text  Providing the necessary historical or cultural background  Helping students with the language of the poem


Download ppt "Materials design and lesson planning: Poetry Literature and Language Teaching (Ch. 6) Lazar Gillian Presenter: Betty Hsu."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google