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BEST PRACTICES AND TAKE AWAYS FOR SERVING STUDENTS WITHOUT STABLE HOUSING Karen Seay, Sherry Tipping, Peggy Miller, Molly Smith, & Mirella Garcia.

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Presentation on theme: "BEST PRACTICES AND TAKE AWAYS FOR SERVING STUDENTS WITHOUT STABLE HOUSING Karen Seay, Sherry Tipping, Peggy Miller, Molly Smith, & Mirella Garcia."— Presentation transcript:

1 BEST PRACTICES AND TAKE AWAYS FOR SERVING STUDENTS WITHOUT STABLE HOUSING Karen Seay, Sherry Tipping, Peggy Miller, Molly Smith, & Mirella Garcia

2 Matt Hyde Idaho State Coordinator for Homeless Education

3 N ATIONAL A SSOCIATION FOR THE E DUCATION OF H OMELESS C HILDREN AND Y OUTH (NAECHY) 25 TH A NNUAL C ONFERENCE N OVEMBER 2 - 5, 2013 H YATT R EGENCY H OTEL A TLANTA, GA

4 Homelessness and Education: Real Students, Real School You Will Get Through It Looking for Your future McKinney-Vento Liaisons: Supporting Students, Schools and Communities

5 T RAUMA -I NFORMED S ERVICES FOR H OMELESS S TUDENTS : H OW OUR C OMMUNITY IS R EACHING OUT AND C HANGING L IVES Jean West MSW LCSW CTC-S School Social Worker Saint Joseph School District Missouri Presented by: Mirella Garcia Nampa School District

6 1) Risks that any non-poverty child might face such as family related and biological factors; 2) Risks children from low-income families face such as poverty and exposure to violence; and 3) Risks associated with being homeless such as worrying about where the family will sleep, worrying about family members, etc. R ISK F ACTOR L AYERS

7 H OMELESSNESS Homelessness is a life altering experience, which can have profound, long-term impact on family members. It not only involves loss of home but disconnection from neighborhoods, community, reassuring routines, belongings, relationships, safety and security. (Vassuk, Volk and Olivet)

8 T RAUMA Any experience that leaves a person feeling hopeless, helpless, fearing for their life/survival, their safety. Important to remember – it is a person’s perception, their experience not ours that makes something traumatic.

9 D O WE DO THIS ?

10 T RAUMA ’ S E FFECT ON B EHAVIOR Hypervigilance Difficulty sleeping Easily startled Clinging Nightmares Disobedience Impaired social skills Anger /rage Can’t self sooth or modulate emotions Depression Attention problems Impulsivity Aggression Fearful Risk taking Panic attacks Hypersensitive to touch, movement, some sounds and smells

11 T RAUMA ’ S E FFECT ON L EARNING In the arousal (anxious) state it becomes difficult to process information, follow directions, recall information, and focus Poor problem solving, attention, and disorganized Often only hear half of the words spoken by their teachers Cognitively will generally be far behind their peers, children can often learn at three times the rate compared to when engulfed in trying to survive

12 I MPACT OF H OMELESSNESS ON C HILDREN Every day, homeless children are confronted with stressful, often traumatic events. 74% of homeless children worry they will have no place to live. 58% worry they will have no place to sleep. 87% worry that something bad will happen to their family. (Impact on education, trauma) National Center on Family Homelessness % of homeless children had been exposed to at least one serious violet event. Almost 25% have witnessed acts of violence within their families. (Vassuk, Volk and Olivet)

13 T HE E MOTIONAL I MPACT More then one-fifth of homeless preschoolers have emotional problems serious enough to require professional care, but less then one-third receive any treatment. Homeless children have twice the rate of learning disabilities and three times the rate of emotional and behavioral problems as nonhomeless children. Half of school-age homeless children experience anxiety, depression, or withdrawal compared to 18% of nonhomeless children. By the time homeless children are eight years old, one in three has a major mental disorder. NCTSN 2005

14 T RAUMA AND H OMELESSNESS Trauma is THE predominant mental health issue for homeless mothers. Research confirms that the strongest predictor of emotional and behavioral problems in poor and homeless children is their mother’s level of emotional distress. HCH 2003 (resiliency research with TLC) Emotional help is needed for both the parents and their children in order to be most effective.

15 T RAUMA -I NFORMED C ARE Trauma-informed care is an approach to engaging people with histories of trauma that recognizes the presence of trauma symptoms and acknowledges the role that trauma has played in their lives. The National Center for Trauma Informed Care 2012

16 SITCAP The National Institute for Trauma and Loss in Children Training available.

17 I MPORTANCE IN A SSESSMENT P ROCESS Programs serving families who are experiencing homelessness have an opportunity to address children’s needs and connect them to appropriate services. To meet children’s needs, questions about their exposure to trauma must be included in the intake assessment.

18 R ESOURCES Buckner, J. (2008). Understanding the impact of homelessness on children: Challenges and future research directions. American Behavioral Scientist. 51(6) Cowan, Beryl Ann, "Trauma exposure and behavioral outcomes in sheltered homeless children: The moderating role of perceived social support" (2007). Psychology Dissertations. Paper 39. HCH Health Care for the homeless Clinician’s network. Trauma and Homelessness.(1999) Vol.3, No.3 HCH Health Care for the homeless clinician’s network. Homelessness and family trauma: The Case for early intervention. (2003) Vol. 7, No. 2 NCTIC The National Center for Trauma Informed Care NCTSN The National Child Traumatic Stress Network. Facts on Trauma and homeless children. (2005) Les Whitbeck, Mental Health and Emerging Adulthood Among Homeless Young People (New York: Psychology Press, 2009) 54, 75. The National Center on Family Homelessness HomelessChildren.pdf

19 R ESOURCES Buckner, J. (2008). Understanding the impact of homelessness on children: Challenges and future research directions. American Behavioral Scientist. 51(6) Cowan, Beryl Ann, "Trauma exposure and behavioral outcomes in sheltered homeless children: The moderating role of perceived social support" (2007). Psychology Dissertations. Paper 39. HCH Health Care for the homeless Clinician’s network. Trauma and Homelessness.(1999) Vol.3, No.3 HCH Health Care for the homeless clinician’s network. Homelessness and family trauma: The Case for early intervention. (2003) Vol. 7, No. 2 NCTIC The National Center for Trauma Informed Care NCTSN The National Child Traumatic Stress Network. Facts on Trauma and homeless children. (2005) Les Whitbeck, Mental Health and Emerging Adulthood Among Homeless Young People (New York: Psychology Press, 2009) 54, 75. The National Center on Family Homelessness HomelessChildren.pdf

20 A H AND U P ! N OT A H ANDOUT … Peer training for McKinney-Vento programs

21 W HAT IS M ASLOW PROJECT ? Purpose and Services: Maslow Project is a nationally-recognized outreach program and goal-oriented resource center that empowers youth impacted by family instability, poverty, or homelessness to achieve independence and self-sufficiency. Maslow Project promotes a youth-centered safety-net model that utilizes a comprehensive web of support, including case management and counseling, support services through agency partnerships, and community resources to best meet the needs of our youth.

22 R ESOURCE CENTER A “one-stop” centralized location for youth to access basic needs and increase immediate connections with supportive services. Basic needs: laundry service, hot meals, food boxes, clothes closet, hygiene supplies, sleeping bags, bus passes, and emergency assistance. Case management: providing enrollment assistance, goal setting, advocacy and support, and “system navigation”. On-site partnerships: to connect youth with wrap-around support services Mental health counseling DHS services Employment/tutoring Enrichment activities/mentoring Life Skills

23 S CHOOL BASED SERVICES McKinney-Vento Liaison Transportation School enrollment School meals Enrollment disputes Professional Development All other Title X required duties Family Advocates/High School case managers Assist students with basic needs, clothing, school supplies, etc. FAFSA forms Advocacy/support Goal setting Track student progress Coordinate referrals and services with other community resources

24 O UTREACH Street outreach gets vital information and supplies to homeless youth and encourages them to seek additional support through the Maslow Project resource center.  School outreach: Classroom presentations, posters/brochures in schools, professional development to school staff  Agency outreach: Advocacy and information sharing with community agencies/partners, host peer trainings, inter-agency meetings/collaborations Street Outreach: Find kids and families on the streets, in parks, shelters, libraries, food pantries, etc. to deliver information on school rights, referrals, basic needs

25 M ASLOW PROJECT MODELS Community Based Programs Maslow Project of Medford (mid-sized urban community)  Independent non-profit agency contracts services through Medford School District. Coordinates Title X consortia and coordinates all Title X funds and activities on behalf of Medford SD  Diverse funding stream: District funds, foundation and local gov’t grants, individual contributions, in-kind, etc. School Based Programs Coos Bay Maslow Project (small coastal rural community)  Funds stay in local School District as part of the Consortia project. Community partnerships work in collaboration. LEA coordinates all Title X activities.  Funds and in-kind contributions also come from community  Community based Resource Center and school based staff Collaboration Programs Rogue River SD/Ashland SD (small rural communities)  Funds come through School Districts who contract through Maslow Project to provide services  Funds and in-kind contributions also come from community  School-based program-Maslow staff work on-site in school

26 K EY STEPS Starts with McKinney Program and Liaison Community needs assessment What resources are available to your populations? What is missing? Creative solutions? Partnerships that work! Identify partners Who is already involved? Are any of them organized and meeting regularly? Consortia/Collaborations Continuum of Care Task Forces Who else can you bring to the table? Build partnerships! Identify Funding Sources School funds can be leveraged for local, state or federal funds How is the community giving? Fundraisers Drives / In-Kind Supplies Sponsorships Foundation Grants

27 K NOW Y OUR R ESOURCES

28 W HO C AN H ELP Y OU ?

29 G ET F UNDING !

30 M ASLOW P ROJECT C OMMUNITY B ASED MODEL Maslow Project (Non-Profit Agency) Local School DistrictCommunity Partners School funds leveraged to get private and public funds to support services to homeless students Community funds, supplies and volunteers to support homeless students Funders MP coordinates funding, supplies and services to ensure wrap-around support for homeless students

31 C ONTACT I NFO Maslow Project Medford, OregonCoos Bay, Oregon Mary FerrellPatty Sanden Executive DirectorProgram Manager bay.k12.or.us

32 E MERGENCY S HELTER AND H OUSING O PTIONS  Family Promise  Housing Options for Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

33 F AMILY P ROMISE National Interfaith Hospitality Network program Emergency Homeless Shelter for families with children Network of congregations and volunteers Immediate needs for shelter, meals and comprehensive support Safe, stable environment Connection to services and resources

34 F AMILY P ROMISE – S POKANE, WA Shelter services provided through 30 churches 12 Host Churches 18 Support Churches Give a hand-up instead of a hand-out Network with other agencies Aftercare and continued support Empower families to get back on their feet and into a sustainable, improved lifestyle

35 F AMILY P ROMISE – S POKANE, WA Host Churches Open rooms in their building for 1 week at a time Sleep in roll-away beds that travel with them Evening and morning meals provided Support Churches Provide food Hospitality Overnight volunteers

36 F AMILY P ROMISE – S POKANE, WA Day Center for services and case management Van provides transportation to the Day Center and to the next church School-aged students are picked up and returned to the Day Center Shower facilities and kitchen are ideal especially if not available at the Host Church

37 F AMILY P ROMISE – S POKANE, WA Up to 14 people at a time, usually about 3 families Guests must be ‘clean and sober’ Volunteers must pass a background check Can invite to participate in church services but cannot require or preach to guests

38 R ESOURCES

39 H OUSING O PTIONS FOR U NACCOMPANIED H OMELESS Y OUTH Housing + High School = Success Publication by NAEHCY Legal Director, Patricia Julianelle Innovative housing programs Host homes Group homes Independent Living Emergency Shelter Steps to consider when creating a program Keys to and tips for success resources/housing-high-school-success

40 Fairfax County, VA model Supporting Unaccompanied Homeless Youth: A Model for Community Collaboration Kathi Sheffel | Felicea Meyer-DeLoatch handouts handouts H OUSING O PTIONS FOR U NACCOMPANIED H OMELESS Y OUTH

41 Host Homes – identify families/individuals in the community willing to take in an UHY while in high school Least cost Background checks Homeowners insurance or renter insurance Potential liability issues if no agency to ‘license’ home; liability waiver forms Temporary guardianship (Power Of Attorney) given by parent to Host Home Family if under 18 H OUSING O PTIONS FOR U NACCOMPANIED H OMELESS Y OUTH

42 Rent Subsidy/Independent Living More costly – up to $700 per month per student To assist student maintain current housing or identify ‘rental’ housing options Rental assistance for student’s current living situation or Usually a room in a family’s home willing to ‘rent’ to the student

43 H OUSING O PTIONS FOR U NACCOMPANIED H OMELESS Y OUTH Shelter/Group Homes Most costly – requires a building a full-time staff 24-hour care Single gender or mixed gender – more challenges Emergency shelter for immediate housing needs while arranging longer-term option Group homes specially for unaccompanied homeless youth or youth aging out of foster care

44 M ENTORING P ROGRAMS Joint School District No. 2, Meridian, Idaho Mooresville Graded School District, Mooresville, North Carolina

45 M ERIDIAN J OINT S CHOOL D ISTRICT N O. 2 Mentoring for students experiencing homelessness. Established a mentoring program in 2008 Grades 8 th -12 th Target unaccompanied youth Mentoring occurs at school during school hours Mentors meet with students up to one hour week

46 M ERIDIAN J OINT S CHOOL D ISTRICT N O. 2 School Year Number of Students Mentored Number of 12 th graders GraduatedCollege

47 A CTIVITIES / AREAS THAT MENTORS FOCUS ON …. Resumes Employment College Applications FAFSA Scholarships Interviewing skills Life Skills training Conflict resolution skills Preparation for senior project Job readiness Career search Extra-curricular activities Academic support Social support

48 W HO ARE MENTORS ? Volunteers from the community Primary source of recruitment are students from undergraduate social work programs and graduate counseling and social work program. Partner with the Service Learning program at Boise State for some mentors. Service Learning student are required to do 45 hours of volunteer work. All mentors are interviewed, reference checked, and background checked through Idaho State Police.

49 H OW D O I START A MENTORING PROGRAM ? Partner with a local university or job program to obtain mentors. Service clubs in the area (Lion’s Club, Kiwansis, Rotary Club) Training Scenarios Training Binder with resources: community, college application, job search, Career Information System, how to complete FAFSA, life skills, social skills.

50 P ROJECT G RADUATION Tools and information for mentors to work with students on various life skills Important Documents (Birth Certificate/Social Security/Driver’s License) Education Employment Entertainment Finances Food and Nutrition Home Transportation

51 O THER M ENTORING P ROGRAMS Change A Life Mentoring Program Mooresville Graded School District in Mooresville, North Carolina Mission is to encourage and support children to be successful academically, personally, and socially. Mentors are available for Kindergarten-12 th graders. Purpose of mentor is to help support at-risk youth staying in school put also be a: Advocate, Motivator, Coach, Advisor, Tutor, Career model, supporter Information regarding program found at: ml

52 F INANCIAL S UPPORT AND R ESOURCES FOR C OLLEGE FOR U NACCOMPANIED H OMELESS Y OUTH Higher Education Resources FAFSA LeTendre Scholarship

53 H IGHER E DUCATION Unaccompanied Youth are eligible for a variety of resources to assist with higher education. Apply for FAFSA as independent students College Fee Waivers ACT/SAT Fee Waivers Scholarships Support through Higher Education Helplines/Resources National Association of Education of Homeless Children and Youth (NAEHCY) National Center on Homeless Education (NCHE)

54 H IGHER E DUCATION S UPPORTS AND NAEHCY Higher Education program through NAEHCY has a lot of support options available. Higher Education Hotline Helping create Statewide Networks Resources Information can be found at: education education Publications to assist with Financial Aid for college (FAFSA) FAFSA Tips sheet for Unaccompanied Youth toolkits for financial aid administrators, liaisons, shelter staff, counselors

55 NAEHCY H IGHER E DUCATION H ELPLINE Give assistance to: Financial Aid Administrators Higher Education Professionals High School Counselors Homeless Liaisons Unaccompanied homeless youth Advocate for unaccompanied youth and can serve as a mediator between financial aid offices and others Questions contact: 1 (855) or

56 N ATIONAL C ENTER ON H OMELESS E DUCATION (NCHE) H IGHER E DUCATION Various Publications and links to programs that can assist unaccompanied youth Helpline: ( )

57 S TATEWIDE N ETWORKS Established to individualize the financial aid process for students. Creates SPOCS (Single-Point-of-Contact) NAEHCY and NCHE help connect State/District Liaisons to post-secondary contacts Creating school kits for unaccompanied youth going away to college Create support networks for unaccompanied to have places to stay on breaks when dorms are closed.

58 FAFSA FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) Unaccompanied youth can apply for the FAFSA Are able to apply as independent students instead of going off of parents income. Normally have to apply based upon parents income until 24. Pell Grants approximately $5,

59 FAFSA V ERIFICATION Students homeless status has to be verified to their college/university of choice. FAFSA Verification letter must be submitted to Higher Education Institution By Local Educational Agency Homeless Liaison Director/Designee of a program funded by the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act Director/Designee of a HUD-funded shelter Financial Aid Administrator Template can be found on NAEHCY Website Under Legislation/Policy>Higher Education>Unaccompanied Homeless Youth Documentation of Independent Student Status for the FAFSA Faxed or sent to financial aid office

60 W AIVERS College Fee Waivers Resources found under Higher Education tab of NAECHY website ACT/SAT link to waiver waivers waivers

61 L E T ENDRE S CHOLARSHIP What is the LeTendre Scholarship Fund? Established in 1998 in memory of André LeTendre Supports youth in homeless situations in their efforts to pursue higher education Administered by the National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth (NAEHCY)

62 L E T ENDRE S CHOLARSHIP General Information Minimum of two $2,000 awarded annually To date, more than 220 recipients A one-time award Can be used for tuition, fees, books or other educational expenses Awarded annually at the NAEHCY conference in November

63 L E T ENDRE S CHOLARSHIP Eligibility Students who are homeless or have been homeless during their K-12 attendance Demonstrated average or higher than average achievement High school seniors, students enrolled in GED or other alternative education program or recent graduates of such

64 L E T ENDRE S CHOLARSHIP Apply by submitting: A completed application form An essay about the impact of homelessness on their lives and the desire to attend college An official school transcript At least one letter of recommendation

65 L E T ENDRE S CHOLARSHIP Complete details and application available at: scholarship-fund/about-the-fund scholarship-fund/about-the-fund Applications can be submitted anytime between December and June. This year’s deadline is 5:00 p.m. EDT on Friday, June 14, Questions? Contact: Patricia Popp, NAEHCY LeTendre Chair, at (757) or

66 C ONTACT I NFORMATION Karen Seay, Idaho State Department of Education (208) Sherry Tipping, Boise School District (208) Molly Smith, Joint District No. 2 (Meridian) (208) Peggy Miller, Nampa School District (208) Mirella Garcia, Nampa School District (208)

67 Q UESTIONS ?


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