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Champlain College Performance Management 2013/2014 Training Session for Managers 1.

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Presentation on theme: "Champlain College Performance Management 2013/2014 Training Session for Managers 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Champlain College Performance Management 2013/2014 Training Session for Managers 1

2 Objectives  Reflect, Review and Plan  Engage Managers and Employees  Professional Development  Connection to the 2020 Plan  Transition to Workday Technology 2

3 Manager’s Role How can you make this process be: –Engaging –Developmentally focused –Positive –Enjoyable –Rich with learning How do you want to connect with your employees? What do you want your employees to say about you after this process? Where do you want to ask your for employees input? 3

4 4 Champlain Aligned Strategic Plan Institutional Priorities Champlain College Mission and Vision Individual Performance and Development Planning Department Goals Divisional Strategies and Priorities Individual Employee Goals

5 5 Components of Performance Management PLANNING – GOAL SETTING PERFORMANCEFEEDBACK PERFORMANCEEVALUTION PERFORMANCE EVALUTION PROFESSIONALDEVELOPMENT

6 What’s Changing? Slight modifications – elimination of redundancies Workday Technology What’s NOT Changing? Functional Process General Timeline Ongoing coaching and feedback employees Staff competencies Professional Development Excite, Engage, Empower Expectations of managers Time it will take /2014 Cycle

7 Why Workday? Aligns to broader institutional talent goals –High performance –Development Access to review goals and review throughout year Roll up to institutional goals Reporting and analytics Ability to identify, target and deliver to professional development needs 7

8 Timeline 8 June-August 2013 Goals established for 2013/2014 January 2014 Mid-year performance discussions March Manager & Employee Training sessions March/April Self- Evaluations Completed May/June Performance Review Discussions held June Compensation Planning 5/9 Evaluations due to next level Mgmt. Promotion Recommend ations 6/13 Performance meetings completed 4/11 Employees submit self- evaluations

9 Timeline 9 DatesActions March Employee and Manager training March 14 th Workday Performance Management launched March 21 st Managers request from employees their written self-evaluations Managers schedule performance evaluation meetings March 24 – April 11Employees submit self-evaluations to managers Managers may hold pre-evaluation meetings with employees where desired

10 DatesActions April 14 - May 9Managers draft employee performance evaluations Managers submit evaluation to next level of management for review and/or discussion Manager’s submit to next level management and VP’s new job descriptions for prospective promotions NOTE: Evaluation are due to next level of management by May 9th May Next level of management reviews evaluation and provides managers feedback May 19 - June 13Managers hold performance evaluation meetings with employees June 13 th NOTE: All performance evaluation meetings must be completed by June 13 June 13 th Completed Performance Evaluations must be fully approved and through the Workday process by June 13th 10

11 11 Functional Process Workday Technology Performance Goals Job Respons- ibilities Competency Development Needs Excite, Engage, Empower Additional Performance Evaluation Comments Overall Summary Performance Evaluation Tool

12 12 Performance Goals Established last summer 4 – 7 Goals SMART goals “Establishing SMART Goals” Specific Measurable Achievable Realistic Time Bound Include UFO’s Performance Evaluation Tool

13 13 Performance Evaluation Tool Overall Rating – Scale Far Exceeds Expectations: Performance that is consistently superior and far exceeds job standards and goals. Exceeds Expectations: Performance that often exceeds job standards. These individuals perform at a level noticeably above what is expected. Successfully Meets Expectations: Performance that consistently meets and sometimes exceeds job standards. These are individuals who make valued contributions to the success of the institution at the level that is expected. Partially Meets Expectations: Performance that partially meets but occasionally is below acceptable job standards. These individuals perform inconsistently and need to improve. Fails to Meet Expectations: Performance that consistently does not meet job standards over the rating period.

14 14 Job Responsibilities Summary of current job responsibilities Not a “task list” Section is rated Performance Evaluation Tool

15 15 Staff competencies Achievement Orientation Adaptability Client Focus Continuous Learning Critical Thinking Diversity & Intercultural Understanding Teamwork &Inclusion Comments – Observations, clarification, examples Tool – Staff Competencies Development Workbook Competencies will not be rated Performance Evaluation Tool

16 16 Development Needs Reflection on past year Has the need been completed? Ongoing? Time well spent here will pay off in spades Purposeful development plans Monitoring, coaching and supporting along the way Regular check-ins Performance Evaluation Tool

17 17 Excite, Engage, Empower What would excite you? How do you like to be engaged? What will make you feel empowered? Opportunity for employees to provide feedback to your manager, your department or the institution Review the employee’s last self-evaluation… what did they say? Performance Evaluation Tool

18 18 Additional Performance Review Comments Feedback received from colleagues, stakeholders, vendors Catch-all Summation Thank you and appreciation Closure Performance Evaluation Tool

19 19 Overall rating Consistency between “written” and “verbal” words Does the rating match the writing? Is there alignment between the manager and the employee? Is it close? If not, why? Performance rating calibration Performance Evaluation Tool

20 20 Overall Rating – Scale Far Exceeds Expectations: Performance that is consistently superior and far exceeds job standards and goals. Exceeds Expectations: Performance that often exceeds job standards. These individuals perform at a level noticeably above what is expected. Successfully Meets Expectations: Performance that consistently meets and sometimes exceeds job standards. These are individuals who make valued contributions to the success of the institution at the level that is expected. Partially Meets Expectations: Performance that partially meets but occasionally is below acceptable job standards. These individuals perform inconsistently and need to improve. Fails to Meet Expectations: Performance that consistently does not meet job standards over the rating period. Performance Evaluation Tool

21 21 Summary Review the summary of your full Performance Review for 2013/2014 Submit to your manager via Workday No changes can be made by employee after submitted Performance Evaluation Tool

22 Significant changes in job responsibilities Increased level of responsibilities vs. increased volume of work Restructure resulting in a new position Manager write new job descriptions Submits to Human Resources by May 9 th –Position evaluated Promotions approved by June 17 th Manager communicates to employee once approved Salary increase, where applicable July 1st 22 Promotions

23 23 Upcoming Trainings Manager Training Managers Round Table, March 11 10:00-12:00 Lakeside 101/102 March 14, 10:00-11:30 Lakeside 101/102 March 17, 8:30-10:00 Aiken Morgan Room Employee Training March 14, 3:30-4:30 Hauke 203 March 17, 2:00-3:00 Aiken Morgan Room March 18, 1:30-2:30 Lakeside 101/102 March 19, 8:30-9:30 Lakeside 101/102

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25 25 Employee completes Self- Evaluation Manager approves Employee Self- Evaluation Manager completes Manager Evaluation on Employee Manager’s Manager approves Manager Evaluation Manager provides Manager Review Comments Employee provides final Employee Review Comments CAUTION: This step will release the evaluation to employee. Please only do so when you are ready. All within Workday

26 Technology 26 All within Workday Google Chrome or Firefox is recommended Spell Check Limited mobile capability Saving

27 Resources Employee’s self-evaluation Staff Competency Development Workbook Your manager Human Resources & Organizational Development Last performance review form Instructions within Workday via Canvas 27

28 ? 28

29 29 Tips: Use “not applicable” as a status if goal is not rated. May select more than one category. UFO’s? Add as an additional goal and indicate they were unplanned. Not applicable vs Not Started Next year’s goals will be a separate process

30 30 Tips: Summarize your job responsibilities in one section (do not use the (+) button multiple times).

31 31 Tips: Review this section to verify you have commented on each competency.

32 32 Tips: You will not use the “Add Existing” box. Relates To gives the option of linking to a staff competency. Use the (+) button to add a new item.

33 33

34 34 Additional Performance Evaluation Comments:

35 35 Tips: The Overall rating is based on the ratings from the Performance Goals and Job Description Can override default You will receive an error if rating is empty

36 36 When you are complete your self-evaluation you will need to click the green submit button. You will not be able to make any changes after you submit. Tips: You may exit at anytime and it will save and resume where you left off. Once submitted no changes can be made. You can print the review before submitting. When manager approves – they are acknowledging receipt – does not mean they agree with every piece.

37 SMART Goal Setting 37 S Specific M Measureable A Achievable R Relevant T Time Bound SMART goals allows leaders to: Maintain clarity of what it is they wish to achieve Monitor their progress on an ongoing basis Allocate resources in support of reaching a goal Plan an employee’s progress towards reaching goals Redirect or refocus an employee’s energy back towards a goal when necessary SMART goals allows employees to: Understand what is expected of them Monitor their own performance against the goals Empower them to achieve results Be clear on the criteria for evaluation Know what the target for solid performance looks like, so that they can hit it

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39 39 Goal Setting for next year Joint process – manager & employee –Agreement –Alignment Ongoing and adjusting

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47 New tool: Workday –Manager –Self-Assessment Signature page Tone –Personalize –First person Advance review 47

48 48 Employee goals for past year Commentary – results achieved Priority levels Rating scale

49 49 Development Plan E3 – Personal

50 50 Performance Feedback Monitor Results Provide Frequent Feedback -.”Coaches don’t put off discussing the game with players”: –Immediate –Specific –Useful –Relevant

51 51

52 52 Giving Feedback Upfront Tacit Avoidance

53 53 Giving Positive Feedback Focuses on your commitment to excellence It sends a powerful motivational message to the “ strugglers ” It ’ s the best way to create and maintain a learning environment It keeps the stars from leaving to seek a manager who appreciates them

54 54 Praise is... specific and tangible... “ What I liked about what you did was... ” “ I noticed that when you talked to the manager, you... ” “ I want to acknowledge that you finished the job ahead of schedule. ” “ From my perspective, it seemed that you headed off a possible confrontation with Jack by taking some extra time to listen to him. ”

55 55... not vague and generalized “ Great job. ” “ Way to go. ” “ Thanks for busting your butt on this project. ” “ You ’ re a good team player. ”

56 56 Constructive Feedback Let them know what you’re going to let them know Don’t build a big logistical case before dropping the bomb Remember, you’re “ahead of the curve” Allow time and a “container” for emotional reactions We can only hope to change outcomes, not the personalities of others in the workplace

57 57 Performance Feedback 80/20Rule

58 58 Data to Consider Pre-Evaluation Meeting Employee Self-Evaluation Use of available Tools (i.e. – forms, reports, data, surveys, previous notes) Your manager’s feedback Other supervisor/manager’s feedback Your direct observations

59 59 Data Gathering Observable: Actions, words, gestures “example” – “I see you smile every time you greet a customer at the reception area”. Behavioral: Can be changed or corrected with instruction or self-discipline Gradient comparisons between unacceptable and outstanding can be made BE aware of things you can’t change!

60 60 Documentation The act of “writing and communicating” a summary of all previous conversations If someone else reads the review…. Can they understand it? Sets the stage for the next review periods goals Links pay for performance

61 61 “The Discussion” Be prepared – Know the objectives and goals of the meeting – Practice Time and Place – Choose a quiet, private spot with as few interruptions as possible Create a positive environment – Help the employee feel at ease Give balanced feedback – Both positive and negative, but start with the positive – Focus on the job, not the person Allow the employee to provide feedback – Open dialogue – 2 way discussion

62 62 “The Discussion” Conducting the review – When discussing areas for improvement, discuss methods and objectives for improving. – Establish formal goals. Explain how these goals are tied to the institution’s objectives and overall mission – Discuss possibilities for advancement, the employee's aspirations and professional development necessary to be a candidate for such future positions.

63 63 “The Discussion” Conclusion: – Summarize and review the important points of the discussion. – Restate any action steps that have been recommended and provide a time frame for completion – Make sure employee reviews the appraisal and encourage comments. – Have employee sign it to acknowledge that he or she has read it (does not signify agreement with the content).

64 64 Dealing with Difficult Employee/Performance Issues The Old Dilemma: “ Avoid or Confront ” – Avoidance usually sends an unclear message, makes things worse over time, and keeps anyone from learning. – Confrontation only leads to misunderstanding, bad feelings, and poor outcomes. – Management needs to adopt a philosophy that, if delivered properly, all performance reviews are good; some are simply harder to conduct.

65 65 Job performance problems Pinpoint – Specific, observable effects Track – Frequency and severity of behaviors Analyze – AFTER pinpointing and tracking, not before – Clarity? Constraints? Relationships? Challenge – Ask for specific changes – Provide resources Evaluate – Don’t forget to both follow-up and reward

66 66 Communication Starters “ I... ” “ I ’ m curious about... ” “ Could you help me understand... ” “ I was wondering... ” “ There ’ s something I need to discuss with you... ” “ I know this may be difficult, however... ”

67 67 Staying “Open” Ask for the other’s perceptions Listen well (we’re talking REALLY well!) Clarify assumptions Find common ground Note strong differences not as right or wrong, but as opportunities What can you learn?

68 68 Be clear about Performance Problems Differentiate between: – Thoughts and feelings “I think you’re a jerk.” “I feel we should order more staples.” – Information and opinions “Your record shows you have a bad attitude.” “I believe that your responsibilities are changing.”

69 69 Performance Problems Link prior conversations and/or warnings into performance review: – Improvement – Continued Issues

70 70 How to Respond to Employees Emotions The Role of Emotion: Almost always present in some form Essential for good problem-solving Be Proactive Anticipate the Reaction Focus on Controlling Your Reaction Ignoring - anger, cynicism, isolation Employee deserves to be: – Respected – Treated professionally – Allowed to have emotion

71 71 Emotional Reactions Crying – Acknowledge emotion, express empathy, return to central theme, take brief timeout if needed Withdrawal – Use open ended questions, reframe, be comfortable with silence, check assumptions Anger – Allow some venting, set limits if necessary, separate thoughts from feelings

72 72 Dealing with Your Own Emotions During a Review Those “ Pesky ” Feelings: Accept that they are normal and natural Can leak or burst into the conversation if not “ managed ” Unexpressed feelings make it difficult to listen Use the urge to blame or withdraw as a clue Don ’ t “ take the bait ” of negative feelings

73 73 Timeliness/Prioritizing As a supervisor, you owe it to yourself, your employee and the manager to conduct the review on time – Consistent message – Employees anticipate it – Potential compensation impact Tips to the process: – Keep a work log – Manage thru a “tickler” or Outlook Task – Draft review immediately – Set clear dates for self-evaluation to be returned – Set date for review

74 74 Top 10 Tips to Successful Evaluations 1. Engage employees 2. Prepare – both the writing and the discussion 3. Review the entire period 4. Listen and hear 5. Take the time 6. Be factual 7. Avoid the “halo” and “horns” effect 8. Do not overrate to motivate 9. Create awareness – don’t avoid/ignore important messages 10. Follow-up

75 75 ENGAGEMENT PROCESS PERFORMANCE PLANNING PERFORMANCEFEEDBACK PERFORMANCEEVALUTION PERFORMANCE EVALUTION SKILLDEVELOPMENT

76 76 Real Situation #1 Issue: Quality of service has significantly gone downhill for this long term employee, Jane. She has proven capabilities in the past, but the mistakes that she is making is starting to impact customers perception of the organization. Other employees are frustrated and you are concerned about her customer service focus. Exercise: 1. Assign one person as the employee, and one person as the supervisor. 2. Discuss what the issue(s) are that need to be discussed with the employee. 3. Role play the actual discussion. 4. Provide direct feedback to the supervisor on what would make the delivery of the discussion more effective. 5. Be prepared to role play to the larger group.

77 77 Real Situation #2 Issue: Our 3 year employee Brad is moody. Some days he walks in chipper as anything, other days he walks in and doesn’t say a word to anyone. He gets a lot of work done and is viewed as very smart. Employees, and the supervisor feel like they have to walk around on egg shells when Brad is around. He always has an opinion, and can often sway people – sometimes not to the benefit of the institution. In previous reviews, his interpersonal skills, communication and intimidation style has been raised. He seems to get it after it is raised for a short period of time, then he’s back to his old behaviors. Exercise: 1. Assign one person as the employee, and one person as the supervisor. 2. Discuss what the issue(s) are that need to be discussed with the employee. 3. Role play the actual discussion. 4. Provide direct feedback to the supervisor on what would make the delivery of the discussion more effective. 5. Be prepared to role play to the larger group.

78 78 Real Situation #3 Issue: Betty is a 45 year old accountant who has been with the organization for 4 years. She has expressed concerns over her ability to continue to work at the level of stress in the job. She thinks she is very organized and enjoys working with the everyone. However, she continually has a difficult time in getting to work on time. Everyone really enjoys working with Betty. Exercise: 1. Assign one person as the employee, and one person as the supervisor. 2. Discuss what the issue(s) are that need to be discussed with the employee. 3. Role play the actual discussion. 4. Provide direct feedback to the supervisor on what would make the delivery of the discussion more effective. 5. Be prepared to role play to the larger group.

79 79 Real Situation #4 Issue: Kathi has been with the organization for 2 years. In that period of time, she has had 2 positions and 3 supervisors due to organizational changes. She has received training in a number of areas of her job, but still seems to have some difficulty in grasping what would be considered basic concepts. There have been times when she has dressed inappropriately for the organization. Her newest supervisor, Jane, questions her level of commitment to the organization and the job. She is up for her review in the next 3 weeks, and Jane has responsibility to do it. The previous supervisor didn’t leave any notes behind regarding Kathi’s performance or goals. Exercise: 1. Assign one person as the employee, and one person as the supervisor. 2. Discuss what the issue(s) are that need to be discussed with the employee. 3. Role play the actual discussion. 4. Provide direct feedback to the supervisor on what would make the delivery of the discussion more effective. 5. Be prepared to role play to the larger group.

80 80 Real Situation #5 Issue: It has been brought to your attention that the brand new TV and VCR in the conference room has been stolen. This was discovered on Tuesday morning after Labor day weekend. There are no visible signs of a break-in, and you have reason to believe that it is an internal job. You are aware of only one employee who worked in the office over the weekend. Deb, the new employee who has been here for 2 months. During the hiring process, you discovered that she had poor credit problems and already she had asked for 2 pay advances. You suspect that she may have stolen the TV and VCR. These suspicions have arisen by 2 other employees “planting a seed” that Deb may have done it. Exercise: 1. Assign one person as the employee, and one person as the supervisor. 2. Discuss what the issue(s) are that need to be discussed with the employee. 3. Role play the actual discussion. 4. Provide direct feedback to the supervisor on what would make the delivery of the discussion more effective. 5. Be prepared to role play to the larger group.

81 81 Overall Process in Workday 1.Employee completes Self-Evaluation 2.Manager approves Employee Self-Evaluation 3.Manager completes Manager Evaluation on employee 4.Manager’s manager approves Manager Evaluation 5.Manager provides Manager Review Comments (releases Manager Evaluation to employee) – Do not complete this step until you are ready for the employee to see the Manager Evaluation 6.Employee provides final Employee Review Comments (receipt of Manager Evaluation) All within Workday

82 82 Top 10 Tips to Successful Evaluations 1. Engage employees 2. Prepare – both the writing and the discussion 3. Review the entire period 4. Listen and hear 5. Take the time needed 6. Be factual 7. Avoid the “halo” and “horns” effect 8. Do not overrate to motivate 9. Create awareness – don’t avoid/ignore important messages 10. Follow-up


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