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Determining Presumptive Eligibility for Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention Using Two Positive Screens: A South Carolina Act Early Work in Progress.

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Presentation on theme: "Determining Presumptive Eligibility for Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention Using Two Positive Screens: A South Carolina Act Early Work in Progress."— Presentation transcript:

1 Determining Presumptive Eligibility for Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention Using Two Positive Screens: A South Carolina Act Early Work in Progress Jane Charles, MD, Kristie Musick, MA, Kathi Lacy, PhD. South Carolina Act Early Team METHODS BACKGROUND RESULTS I CONCLUSIONS ADDITIONAL ISSUES AND FUTURE EFORTS It is recognized that early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI) provided by Part C programs for very young children at risk for/with ASD is crucial for the best outcome. However, identification of children eligible for Part C services lags due to excessive delays from the time of parental concern to the time of diagnosis. Often, by the time of definitive diagnosis, the child has aged out of Part C services. OBJECTIVES This program was modeled on the STAT-MD Program developed by Drs. Wendy Stone and Zachary Warren of Vanderbilt University in collaboration with the Tennessee branch of the American Academy of Pediatrics. To address concerns regarding reliability and experience of medical providers and other allied health professionals in accurately administering a standardized screening tool, future training for providers will include: This may reduce the number of primary care providers available but will assure the integrity of the program. Providers must be agency approved. Currently, the list includes: The STAT MD program is a viable tool to increase the number of younger children eligible for EIBI services under Part C. EIBI services for children who failed the STAT started in October In one year, 204 children total were approved for EIBI, 104 from a failed STAT. Three children who received EIBI who went on to have a definitive ASD evaluation were found not to have an ASD. Number of Individuals Eligible for EIBI Since 10/12 As of 10/13 Create a framework for performing ASD evaluation in community-based practices that could: Reduce waits between screening concerns and service delivery Meet time demands for Part C eligibility. Link children with appropriate early intervention services. Provide adequate reimbursement for screening services performed by physicians. March 2012 CDC reports Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders is 1 in 88 The South Carolina Act Early Team used a grant from the Association of Maternal and Child Health (AMCHP), “Act Early State Systems Grant” to pilot the STAT-MD program. The program trained interested medical and allied health professionals from around the state to use the Screening Tool for Autism in Toddlers (STAT) as a second level screening for children with a positive M-CHAT As a result of policy changes at the state level, children found “at risk” using the STAT are presumed to have an ASD and are referred for EIBI services through the Part C program. Children receive EIBI until a definitive diagnostic evaluation using the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic (ADOS-G) can be performed If it is determined that a child has an ASD, the child is eligible to participate in the state’s Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) Waiver to receive an additional three years of EIBI services. Commitment to routine “re-training” for reliability. Commitment to a specified number of evaluations to remain reliable. Instruction on administering standardized tools. Four Development al/ Behavioral Pediatricians Four Primary Care Pediatricians Four PhD psychologist s 1 LPN 1 MSW 1 BSW 11 Autism consultants employed by DDSN


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