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COMMERCIAL WILDLIFE RANCHING’S CONTRIBUTION TO THE “GREEN ECONOMY” PRESENTATION TO THE GREEN ECONOMIC FORUM 19 MAY 2010 Dr. G.C. Dry.

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Presentation on theme: "COMMERCIAL WILDLIFE RANCHING’S CONTRIBUTION TO THE “GREEN ECONOMY” PRESENTATION TO THE GREEN ECONOMIC FORUM 19 MAY 2010 Dr. G.C. Dry."— Presentation transcript:

1 COMMERCIAL WILDLIFE RANCHING’S CONTRIBUTION TO THE “GREEN ECONOMY” PRESENTATION TO THE GREEN ECONOMIC FORUM 19 MAY 2010 Dr. G.C. Dry

2 DEFINITION WILDLIFE RANCHING/FARMING For the purpose of this discussion, commercial wildlife ranching is defined as the management of game in a sizable game fenced system, with minimal human intervention in the form of: the provision of water; the supplementation of food in periods of drought; the control of parasites; and the provision of health care.

3 SOUTH AFRICAN LAND AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION Land allocation Number of commercial wildlife ranches People employed

4 HISTORICAL OVERVIEW Towards middle of 20 th Century – Wildlife had no economic value – Regarded as competitor for livestock grazing land – At that stage only 19 bontebok, blesbok and 30 white rhinoceros in South Africa 1894 Government intervention – Statutory game reserves established (mostly in tsetse fly and malaria areas) – As rule marginal land e.g. non-agricultural ‘rich’ land 2008 State Conservation Areas and Commercial Game Ranching – South Africa has more wildlife than past 150 years – Economic value of wildlife gained momentum

5 SOME KEY DATA SETS The number of commercial farmers has dropped to some Approximately 12m ha of over-grazed and degraded communal land that could offer a sustainable income for rural communities. Commercial wildlife ranching industry has transformed 20m ha of marginal agricultural land into thriving land-use operations. More than half of the total number of farmers are engaged in mixed- farming activities. A typical commercial game ranch generates approximately R220 of economic output, compared to an average R80/ha for conventional livestock farming.

6 SOME KEY DATA SETS CONTINUE…. Gross income from major agricultural products for 2008/09. PoultryR20bn Red MeatR18bn MaizeR18bn FruitR15bn VegetablesR10bn Wildlife RanchingR7,7bn Followed by other agri-commodities such as milk, sugar cane, etc. Only 17% of RSA agri-land has high agri-production potential with 80% marginal (RSA value of Agri output per ha = $200 (or R1 480 at current exchange rate) than the world average. Eco-tourism industry accounts for at least R1 billion in value added. Its indirect multiplier effect is of a roughly similar size. Total turnover in this market segment is about R2 billion. Not surprisingly, the game-ranching industry has been expanding at a rate of about 5% per annum in real terms during the past decade.

7 SELF-ASSESSMENT PositiveNegative –Game better adapted to marginal conditions in SA (also refer pending global warming). –Not dependant on grain based feeds. –Both consumptive & non-consumptive revenue. –Extensive game stock production base. –Promotes Bio-Diversity/Conservation. –Positive environmental impact and green footprint. –The wildlife of no other continent remotely approaches the actual and potential value of Southern Africa (RSA & Namibia). –If carefully managed commercial wildlife ranching industry will always be Southern Africa’s comparative advantage (unique selling point). –Institutional Regulatory regime. –Perception as a white, affluent industry. –Perceived threat to the livestock industry. –Perceived risk to food security. –Dysfunctional industry information systems & data availability. –Current mindset of Regulators. –Government’s “knee-jerking” policy development e.g. nationalisation of commercial game ranches.

8 KEY THEMATIC ISSUES An honest self-assessment of our government’s current paradigm and actions at large will show that ‘conservation per se’ is not remotely that important in the national socio-political psyche. In fact, in developmental state there is, as a rule, apathy towards ‘conservation’. The conservation agencies and the commercial wildlife industry will most definitely both be seriously impaired if we fail to convince all stakeholders that commercial game ranching and conservation are different, but at the same time two sides of the same coin. Commercial game farming will not be recognized as a major sustainable green economy enabler and needs intensified support from government.

9 ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS On average, even the most successful game ranch requires at least R6m capital outlay for every R1 revenue generated annually. A small ranch requires a capex investment of R3,5m. A large ranch would require at least R16,5m. Over the past 15 years, the industry, measured in terms of turnover, grew at an average rate of 20,3% per annum. Estimated 2,5 million heads of game commercially owned which is estimated 4 times more than state owned parks. On average of 45 mammal species, 266 bird species, 43 reptile species, 17 tree species, 29 grass species and 88 other plant species per wildlife ranch with eco-tourism. During the 5 hunting months per annum, game meat provides 10% of red meat utilised in South Africa.

10 Profitability of commercial game ranching (1 000 LSU capacity) Hunting ranchesEco-tourism GrasslandLowveldBushveldKalahariKarooLowveldBushveld Gross Operating Income Harvest of game Accommodation & other income Gross Operating Expenditure Staff costs Catering costs Maintenance costs Depreciation Capital Investments Land & fencing Game Buildings & infrastructure Vehicles Net Operating Profit Before Tax: Net Operating Profit Total Investments Made Net Operating Margin Return on Capital ,9% 10,3% ,1% 3,0% ,7% 5,7% ,8% 9,0% ,9% 8,3% ,3% 10,9% ,8% 13,0% Profitability of livestock farming (cattle / sheep) Cattle farmingSheep farming GrasslandLowveldBushveldKalahariKaroo Return on Capital4,8%0,9%1,9%7,0%7,2%

11 Profitability of commercial game farming with buffalo Mixed-buffalo Farming Grassland 400 ha Buffalo Ranching * Lowveld 100 ha * Or any other Exotic specie Hunting Ranch 150 LSU Grassland 500 ha Gross Operating Income Sales of game/livestock Accommodation Income Gross Operating Expenditure Staff costs Catering costs Maintenance & medical costs Depreciation Capital Investments Land & fencing Game/livestock Buildings & infrastructure Vehicles Net Operating Profit Before Tax Net Operating Profit Total Investments Net Operating Margin Return on Capital ,3% 19,5% ,6% 21,4% ,8% 5,9%

12 TYPICAL CURRENT MARKET VALUES SpeciesType Price (R) Roan antelope Gnu (Golden) Buffalo Buffalo (Lowveld) Buffalo (Savana) White Rhino Impala (black-backed) Sable antelope Bull Cow Breeding group Cow Heifer Cow Heifer Bull Cow Breeding group Bull Ram Bull Cow Breeding group

13 INTERNATIONAL GAME MEAT CONSUMPTION Western Europe Market size for Game Meat 100,000 tons plus Current Game Meat supply tons plus SA Exports (current) Between 600 and 2,000 tons Valued between R60 - R200 million Strong demand for organic/natural products New Zealand’s export volumes ( tons or heads) are 41 times greater than South Africa

14 INSTITUTIONAL, POLICY & GOVERNANCE Split commercial game output management from regulatory control Biodiversity & Conservation Biodiversity & Conservation Policy & Compliance Management Transfrontier Conservation & Protected Areas Biodiversity Heritage & Urban Conservation Law Enforcement – not only mammals, but also: – Flora – Mining pollution – Industrial pollution Commercial Wildlife Industry Wildlife Production (local and international markets) Food security Wildlife Eco-tourism & Hunting Meat safety (jointly with Dept of A, F & F & Dept of Health) Applied research to extend knowledge i.r.o. wildlife ranching and conservation Veterinary services (jointly with Dept of A, F & F) Appropriate land use Industry Transformation Charter

15 INSTITUTIONAL, POLICY & GOVERNANCE CONTINUE…. PROPOSED OPERATING MODEL

16 CONCLUSION Change the Institutional and Stakeholders mindset. In South Africa’s socio-political landscape, it is an undisputed reality that commercial wildlife ranching is about appropriate land-use and rural development; it is less about “animals per se”, not a “white affluent issue”, not a “conservation at all cost thing”, it’s about economical sustainability with a powerful “green footprint”. It is a land-use option that is ecological appropriate, economical sustainable, political sensitive, but finally, socially just. With regards to Black Economic Empowerment for instance, WRSA members could assist the state with mentoring programmes for emerging black game farmers to sustainably farm on current dysfunctional provincial and local government “conservation” parks or conservancies with negative tourism and no biodiversity contribution, if same could be made available by the state.

17 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR TRACTION TO A GREEN ECONOMY USE LOW HANGING FRUIT (ISSUES) TO CREATE TRACTION (PROPOSAL) ISSUE #1 DEA Preservation and Conservation Outlook pre-occupation forced onto commercial game ranchers PROPOSAL Split commercial game ranching (with adequate fencing) from state parks management where biodiversity (conservation) is the thrust of their legal mandates.

18 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR TRACTION CONTINUE…. ISSUE # System of Legislation and Regulation. PROPOSAL Although the Constitution provides for the system, it should be easy to resolve with good leadership. Bring provincial legislation in line with national DEA. ISSUE #3 Almost impossible for DEA National to implement legislation and regulations in 9 different Provinces right through to the lowest level officials given all the capacity constraints. PROPOSAL Self-administration by WRSA

19 RECOMMENDATION FOR TRACTION CONTINUE…. ISSUE #4 Biodiversity Act’s definition of Alien Species PROPOSAL Change the definition to reflect that alien species should refer to exotic species from outside RSA. No indigenous species to be alien in RSA. ISSUE #5 “Pre-cautionary Principle” incorrectly applied PROPOSAL “Pre-cautionary Principle “<1year duration

20 RECOMMENDATION FOR TRACTION CONTINUE…. ISSUE #6 Translocation of colour variations PROPOSAL Allow colour variations, given that It is a recessive gene, It is a natural colour (Act-of-God), It poses no threat to Biodiversity and Use it to facilitate tourism to South Africa given that we have no Serengeti, but we have Golden Gnu’s. Golden Gnu

21 THANK YOU

22 PRESENTER’S NOTES: GLOBAL CONSERVATION: STATE CONTROLLED ESTATES Global target is 12% of terrestrial & marine surface proclaimed Protected Areas world wide – covering 12% of the world’s total earth surface with less than 1% marine. Africa “conserves under State protection” 11,2% of its total surface (Zambia 30%, Tanzania 28%, Uganda 21%, South Africa 22,9% (6,1% + 16,8% privately owned). World-wild “conversation estate under government protection” is shrinking because of human footprint.

23 PRESENTER’S NOTES: NATIONAL COMMERCIAL WILDLIFE INDUSTRY VALUE CHAIN IRO HUNTING


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