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Environmental Resources Unit. Problem Area Introduction to Wildlife.

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Presentation on theme: "Environmental Resources Unit. Problem Area Introduction to Wildlife."— Presentation transcript:

1 Environmental Resources Unit

2 Problem Area Introduction to Wildlife

3

4 Lesson Exploring the History and Importance of Wildlife Management

5 Learning Objectives Explain the history of wildlife conservation. Explain the history of wildlife conservation. Describing the national policies that impact wildlife conservation. Describing the national policies that impact wildlife conservation. Identify historical people related to wildlife conservation. Identify historical people related to wildlife conservation. Describe the values of wildlife. Describe the values of wildlife. Define wildlife conservation and wildlife management. Define wildlife conservation and wildlife management.

6 Terms to Know Aesthetic value Aesthetic value Commercial value Commercial value Domestication Domestication Ecological value Ecological value Ecology Ecology Endangered species act Endangered species act Exploitation Exploitation Forest service Forest service Game value Game value

7 Terms to Know Lacey Act Lacey Act Migratory Bird Conservation Act Migratory Bird Conservation Act Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp Act Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp Act National Park Service National Park Service Pittman-Robertson Act Pittman-Robertson Act Scientific value Scientific value Wildlife Wildlife Wildlife conservation Wildlife conservation Wildlife management Wildlife management Wildlife Refuge Service Wildlife Refuge Service

8 Explain the history of wildlife conservation In the 1600’s, when the pilgrims arrived, wildlife was plentiful and was able to meet the needs of the people. In the 1600’s, when the pilgrims arrived, wildlife was plentiful and was able to meet the needs of the people. Needs turned into wants, which led to exploitation—the use of natural resources for profit. Needs turned into wants, which led to exploitation—the use of natural resources for profit. By the 1800’s, people began to see a need for conservation of our natural resources By the 1800’s, people began to see a need for conservation of our natural resources

9 What is the history of wildlife conservation? What is the history of wildlife conservation? Morrill Act of 1862 Morrill Act of 1862 Established colleges to teach agriculture. Established colleges to teach agriculture. Made “land grant universities” such as the University of Illinois. Made “land grant universities” such as the University of Illinois.

10 What is the history of wildlife conservation? Yellowstone National Park Yellowstone National Park First national park in the world. First national park in the world. Its purpose was to preserve the natural resources of the area. Its purpose was to preserve the natural resources of the area Located in Idaho, Montana & Wyoming Located in Idaho, Montana & Wyoming 3,472 sq. miles 3,472 sq. miles 2,221,773 sq. acres 2,221,773 sq. acres

11 What are the national policies that impact wildlife conservation? National Park Service National Park Service Enacted in Enacted in Federal agency responsible for the care of the national parks. Federal agency responsible for the care of the national parks. Lacey Act Lacey Act Regulates the shipment of illegally killed animals. Regulates the shipment of illegally killed animals. Made it illegal to trade protected wildlife. Made it illegal to trade protected wildlife.

12 What are the national policies that impact wildlife conservation? Migratory Bird Conservation Act Migratory Bird Conservation Act First step in protecting migratory birds. First step in protecting migratory birds Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp Act Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp Act Requires people planning on hunting migratory birds to purchase special stamps. Requires people planning on hunting migratory birds to purchase special stamps Has raised over $1 billion to date. Has raised over $1 billion to date.

13 What are the national policies that impact wildlife conservation? Pittman-Robertson Act Pittman-Robertson Act Raises money in the form of taxes on hunting equipment and ammunition Raises money in the form of taxes on hunting equipment and ammunition

14 What are the national policies that impact wildlife conservation? Endangered Species Act Endangered Species Act Identifies and manages rare, threatened and endangered species. Identifies and manages rare, threatened and endangered species. Threatened-population is in danger of becoming endangered. Threatened-population is in danger of becoming endangered. Endangered-population is in danger of becoming extinct. Endangered-population is in danger of becoming extinct.

15 What are the national policies that impact wildlife conservation? Wildlife Refuge System Wildlife Refuge System A system of wildlife refuges across the United States. A system of wildlife refuges across the United States. A part of the US Fish and Wildlife Service. A part of the US Fish and Wildlife Service

16 What are the national policies that impact wildlife conservation? Forest Service Forest Service Part of the USDA that manages 156 forests covering 191 million acres of forests and grassland. Part of the USDA that manages 156 forests covering 191 million acres of forests and grassland.

17 Historical People in Wildlife Conservation John James Audubon (1785–1851) John James Audubon (1785–1851) Watched and studied birds. Watched and studied birds. Published a book about his bird studies. Published a book about his bird studies the National Audubon Society was formed the National Audubon Society was formed.

18 Historical People in Wildlife Conservation John Muir (1838–1914) John Muir (1838–1914) Partly responsible for the development of Yellowstone and Sequoia National Parks. Partly responsible for the development of Yellowstone and Sequoia National Parks. Encouraged President Roosevelt to establish these parks. Encouraged President Roosevelt to establish these parks. Started the Sierra Club. Started the Sierra Club. California forest named after him. California forest named after him.

19 Historical People in Wildlife Conservation Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919) Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919) Known as the “Father of the Conservation Movement”. Known as the “Father of the Conservation Movement”. Passed legislations to help protect natural resource. Passed legislations to help protect natural resource.

20 Historical People in Wildlife Conservation Aldo Leopold (1886–1948) Aldo Leopold (1886–1948) Applied ecology to wildlife. Applied ecology to wildlife. Ecology is the study of how organisms interact with their environment. Ecology is the study of how organisms interact with their environment. Wrote a book called Game Management that was used to help further educate wildlife biologists. Wrote a book called Game Management that was used to help further educate wildlife biologists.

21 Historical People in Wildlife Conservation Gifford Pinchot (1865–1946) Gifford Pinchot (1865–1946) One of the first leaders of what is now known as the U.S. Forest Service. One of the first leaders of what is now known as the U.S. Forest Service. Wrote a book called The Fight for Conservation. Wrote a book called The Fight for Conservation. His efforts focused on the conservation of forests. His efforts focused on the conservation of forests.

22 Historical People in Wildlife Conservation Hugh Bennett (1881–1960 Hugh Bennett (1881–1960 Father of soil conservation. Father of soil conservation. First person to run the Soil Conservation Service. First person to run the Soil Conservation Service. Jay Darling (1872–1962) Jay Darling (1872–1962) Designed the first migratory bird stamp. Designed the first migratory bird stamp. Drew cartoons of wildlife and natural resources. Drew cartoons of wildlife and natural resources. His cartoons made the public aware of the need for wildlife conservation. His cartoons made the public aware of the need for wildlife conservation.

23 The work of Jay Darling “Land, water and vegetation are just that dependent on one another. Without these three primary elements in natural balance, we can have neither fish nor game, wild flowers nor trees, labor nor capital, nor sustaining habitat for humans” “Land, water and vegetation are just that dependent on one another. Without these three primary elements in natural balance, we can have neither fish nor game, wild flowers nor trees, labor nor capital, nor sustaining habitat for humans” Jay “Ding” Darling Jay “Ding” Darling

24 The work of Jay Darling

25 What are the values of wildlife Plants and animals that have not been domesticated are called wildlife. Plants and animals that have not been domesticated are called wildlife. Domestication is being under control of humans. Domestication is being under control of humans. There are five basic values of wildlife There are five basic values of wildlife

26 Five Basic Values of Wildlife Aesthetic value—the enjoying of wildlife’s beauty and pleasure Aesthetic value—the enjoying of wildlife’s beauty and pleasure Scientific value—studying and research of wildlife for their use in medications, integrated pest management, etc… Scientific value—studying and research of wildlife for their use in medications, integrated pest management, etc… Ecological Value—the interaction of wildlife in nature Ecological Value—the interaction of wildlife in nature

27 Five Basic Values of Wildlife Commercial—using wildlife to earn money Commercial—using wildlife to earn money Game Value—the enjoyment value gained through hunting and fishing Game Value—the enjoyment value gained through hunting and fishing

28 What are wildlife conservation and wildlife management? Wildlife Conservation — the wise use of natural resources in our environment. Wildlife Conservation — the wise use of natural resources in our environment. Wildlife Conservation is divided in 4 parts. Wildlife Conservation is divided in 4 parts. Education—learning how to conserve wildlife and its resources. Education—learning how to conserve wildlife and its resources. Research—using science to better understand the needs and requirements of wildlife and its habitat. Research—using science to better understand the needs and requirements of wildlife and its habitat.

29 What are wildlife conservation and wildlife management? Wildlife Conservation is divided in 4 parts (continued) Wildlife Conservation is divided in 4 parts (continued) Law Enforcement—ensures that all laws related to wildlife are followed. Law Enforcement—ensures that all laws related to wildlife are followed. Wildlife Management—manipulation of wildlife to achieve a positive goal. Wildlife Management—manipulation of wildlife to achieve a positive goal.

30 Review What is wildlife exploitation? What is wildlife exploitation? List and explain the national policies that impact wildlife conservation. List and explain the national policies that impact wildlife conservation. Identify historical people to wildlife conservation. Identify historical people to wildlife conservation. Describe the values of wildlife. Describe the values of wildlife. What is wildlife management? What is wildlife management? What is wildlife conservation? What is wildlife conservation?

31 Environmental Resources CD Unit Natural Resources

32 Problem Area Outdoor Recreation

33 Lesson Understanding the National Park System

34 What are Some Examples of National Parks and Historic Sites in the United States?

35 Learning Objectives Understand the history and purpose of the National Park System. Understand the history and purpose of the National Park System. Understand how National Park System units are designated. Understand how National Park System units are designated.

36 Terms Affiliated Areas Affiliated Areas National Historical Park National Historical Park National Historic Site National Historic Site National Memorial National Memorial National Monument National Monument National Park National Park National Preserve National Preserve Organic Act Organic Act Parkway Parkway

37 How was the National Park System Established and What is its Purpose? In 1872, Congress established Yellowstone National Park in the territories of Montana and Wyoming as a public park for the benefit and enjoyment of the people and placed it under exclusive control of the Secretary of the Interior. In 1872, Congress established Yellowstone National Park in the territories of Montana and Wyoming as a public park for the benefit and enjoyment of the people and placed it under exclusive control of the Secretary of the Interior.

38 How was the National Park System Established and What is its Purpose? Yellowstone National Park was the first public park and its founding began a worldwide park movement. Yellowstone National Park was the first public park and its founding began a worldwide park movement. Currently more than 100 nations contain some 1,200 national parks. Currently more than 100 nations contain some 1,200 national parks.

39 National Park System Development On August 25th, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the Organic Act, which formed the National Park Service. On August 25th, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the Organic Act, which formed the National Park Service. The National Park Service was created as a new federal bureau in the Department of the Interior and it was responsible for protecting the 40 national parks and monuments in existence at that time and those yet to be established. The National Park Service was created as a new federal bureau in the Department of the Interior and it was responsible for protecting the 40 national parks and monuments in existence at that time and those yet to be established.

40 National Park System Development The Organic Act states that “the Service shall promote and regulate the use of Federal areas known as national parks, monuments, and reservations...to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wild life therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such a manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.” The Organic Act states that “the Service shall promote and regulate the use of Federal areas known as national parks, monuments, and reservations...to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wild life therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such a manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.”

41 National Park System Development Today the National Park Service of the United States is comprised of over 380 national parks, and other designated monuments and areas, which cover more than 83 million acres in 49 States, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, Saipan, and the Virgin Islands. National Parks have over 250 million visitors, annually. Today the National Park Service of the United States is comprised of over 380 national parks, and other designated monuments and areas, which cover more than 83 million acres in 49 States, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, Saipan, and the Virgin Islands. National Parks have over 250 million visitors, annually.

42 National Park System Development National Parks in the United States are created by acts of Congress. National Parks in the United States are created by acts of Congress. National Parks are “areas of national significance distinguished by superlative natural scenery, set aside for preservation as nearly as possible in unimpaired condition and dedicated to the use and inspiration of the people.” National Parks are “areas of national significance distinguished by superlative natural scenery, set aside for preservation as nearly as possible in unimpaired condition and dedicated to the use and inspiration of the people.”

43 How are National Park System Units Designated? The National Park Service consists of more than 380 areas. The National Park Service consists of more than 380 areas. The areas can be classified into three categories: natural areas, historical areas, and recreational areas The areas can be classified into three categories: natural areas, historical areas, and recreational areas

44 Categories of National Park Service Sites National Park: National parks are large natural places that a have a wide variety of attributes. Consumptive activities, such as hunting or fishing are typically not allowed. National Park: National parks are large natural places that a have a wide variety of attributes. Consumptive activities, such as hunting or fishing are typically not allowed. National Monument: The President can proclaim landmarks, structures, and other objects of historic or scientific interest on land owned or controlled by the government to be national monuments. National Monument: The President can proclaim landmarks, structures, and other objects of historic or scientific interest on land owned or controlled by the government to be national monuments.

45 Fireworks Over National Monuments in Washington D.C.

46 National Preserve: National preserves are areas that have characteristics associated with national parks, but Congress has permitted activities such as hunting, trapping, and oil exploration. National Preserve: National preserves are areas that have characteristics associated with national parks, but Congress has permitted activities such as hunting, trapping, and oil exploration. Categories of National Park Service Sites

47 National Historic Site: A national historical site is a site that contains a single historical feature. National Historic Site: A national historical site is a site that contains a single historical feature. National Historical Park: National historic parks are historical areas that extend beyond single properties or buildings. National Historical Park: National historic parks are historical areas that extend beyond single properties or buildings.

48 National Memorial: A national memorial is commemorative of a historical person or episode. National Memorial: A national memorial is commemorative of a historical person or episode. Categories of National Park Service Sites

49 National Battlefield: Sites in this category include national battlefield parks, national battlefield sites, and national military parks. National Battlefield: Sites in this category include national battlefield parks, national battlefield sites, and national military parks. National Cemetery: There are 14 national cemeteries and all of them are associated with another unit of the National Park Service. National Cemetery: There are 14 national cemeteries and all of them are associated with another unit of the National Park Service. Categories of National Park Service Sites

50 Arlington National Cemetery

51 National Recreational Area: There are currently 17 national recreational areas within the National Park Service. National Recreational Area: There are currently 17 national recreational areas within the National Park Service. Twelve of which are centered on large reservoirs and emphasize water recreation. Twelve of which are centered on large reservoirs and emphasize water recreation. Five of the national recreational areas are located in major population areas and combine open spaces with the preservation of significant historic resources and natural areas to provide outdoor recreation for large numbers of people. Five of the national recreational areas are located in major population areas and combine open spaces with the preservation of significant historic resources and natural areas to provide outdoor recreation for large numbers of people. Categories of National Park Service Sites

52 National Seashore: Ten national seashores have been established on the Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific Coasts. National Seashore: Ten national seashores have been established on the Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific Coasts. Categories of National Park Service Sites

53 National Lakeshore: National lakeshores are similar to seashores and are all on the Great Lakes National Lakeshore: National lakeshores are similar to seashores and are all on the Great Lakes National River: This category contains several variations such as: national river and recreational area, national scenic river, wild river, and etc. National River: This category contains several variations such as: national river and recreational area, national scenic river, wild river, and etc. Categories of National Park Service Sites

54 National Parkway: National parkways are intended for scenic motoring along a protected corridor and they often connect cultural sites. National Parkway: National parkways are intended for scenic motoring along a protected corridor and they often connect cultural sites. A parkway refers to the roadway and the parkland paralleling the roadway. A parkway refers to the roadway and the parkland paralleling the roadway. Categories of National Park Service Sites

55 National Trail: National scenic trails and national historic trails are the titles give to these linear parklands authorized under the National Trails System Act of National Trail: National scenic trails and national historic trails are the titles give to these linear parklands authorized under the National Trails System Act of Categories of National Park Service Sites

56 Affiliated Areas: includes a variety of locations in the U.S. and Canada that preserve significant properties outside the National Park Service, not owned by the federal government. Affiliated Areas: includes a variety of locations in the U.S. and Canada that preserve significant properties outside the National Park Service, not owned by the federal government. Other Designations have unique titles or combinations of titles such as the White House and Prince William Forest Park. Other Designations have unique titles or combinations of titles such as the White House and Prince William Forest Park. Categories of National Park Service Sites

57 Review / Summary How was the National Park System established and what is its purpose? How was the National Park System established and what is its purpose? How are National Park System units designated? How are National Park System units designated?


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