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Westward Expansion Part 2 Lesson one Adapted from Mrs. Walker.

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Presentation on theme: "Westward Expansion Part 2 Lesson one Adapted from Mrs. Walker."— Presentation transcript:

1 Westward Expansion Part 2 Lesson one Adapted from Mrs. Walker

2 K W L Use the KWL chart to answer these questions. What do you know about the Cherokee people? What do you want to know about the Cherokee people and Sequoyah? Later as a class write down what you have learned about Cherokee people and Sequoyah?

3 Objective: Students will learn about the life of Sequoyah and his impact on the Cherokee Nation. Students will locate the 6 tribal regions of the Native Americans

4 Words To Know: Cherokee Tribe Village Clan

5 Southeastern Woodlands

6 Cherokee The Cherokee (CHAIR-uh-kee) are a Native American tribe that lived in the Southeastern Woodlands. A tribe is a group of people who share the same language, tradition and ancestors. Cherokee tribes in Tennessee were located in East Tennessee. Cherokee

7 The Cherokee lived in small villages located near rivers. A village is a small group of houses and the people who live there. Tennessee was named after the Cherokee village Tanase, which was located near present day Monroe County.

8 Cherokee villages were located near rivers. Most Cherokee lived in log cabins or earth lodges. Cherokee villages had a circular Council House for meetings. Cherokee Villages

9 Every Cherokee belonged to a clan. A clan is a particular group of families that share a common ancestor. There were 7 Cherokee clans: Wolf, Paint, Deer, Bird, Wild Potato, Blue, and Longhair. People in a clan treated every member of the clan like brothers and sisters, even if they lived in a different village. Cherokee Clans

10 Cherokee Clothing Cherokee wore clothing made from deerskin. Men commonly decorated their bodies and faces with tattoos or paint.

11 Cherokee Daily Life The Cherokee were farmers and hunters. They grew corn, beans, and squash along with other crops. Corn was their most important food. The most important animal was the deer.

12 Cherokee Daily Life Men taught boys how to make blow guns, darts, and weapons from flint. Boys helped build cabins and carve canoes from wood. Note: Picture is hyperlinked to a video of a blowgun demonstration.

13 Cherokee Daily Life Women taught girls how to make jewelry and cook. Girls practiced weaving baskets from strips of wood.

14 Tribal Region Map As your teacher reads to you the different types of homes used in each region, cut and glue them to you map. Use the map to locate the different Tribal regions including where the Cherokee lived

15 Westward Expansion Part 2 Lesson 2- Sequoyah’s Name

16 K W L Use the KWL chart to answer these questions. What do you know about the Cherokee people? What do you want to know about the Cherokee people and Sequoyah? Later as a class write down what you have learned about Cherokee people and Sequoyah?

17 Objective: Students will learn about the life of Sequoyah and his impact on the Cherokee Nation.

18 Words to Know respect: to have or show high regard for; esteem; honor noble: having or showing good moral qualities hero: a person who is known for their courage, nobility, great deeds, etc.

19 Sequoyah One of the best-known people in Cherokee history is Sequoyah. Sequoyah is also known as George Gist. His mother was Cherokee, a member of the paint clan, and his father was white. Sequoyah grew up in the village of Tuskegee, Tennessee and did not speak English.

20 Sequoyah was most likely born between 1760 and 1770. Sequoyah was born in the Cherokee village of Tuskegee on the Tennessee River.

21 His mother was Cherokee and his father was an English fur trader. His father named him George Gist (or Guess), but he went by the name Sequoyah, which means “pig foot” in Cherokee. It is known that he walked with a limp, but the actual reason for his disability is unknown.

22 Sequoyah He became fascinated with the way the English communicated with written words. Sequoyah called the English system of writing “talking leaves”. Some say he used this name because he believed the white man’s words dried up and blew away like the leaves when they changed their minds.

23 Sequoyah One day, Chief Charles Hicks taught Sequoyah how to write his name so he could sign his work like other silversmiths did. Sequoyah wanted the Cherokee to be able to communicate and preserve their traditions through writings like the white man. Sequoyah decided to create written words for the Cherokee language.

24 Sequoyah At first he used Pictographs but realized that there would be thousands of symbols in Cherokee language. Instead he decided to create symbols for each syllable the Cherokee spoke. Over 12 years, Sequoyah invented about 85 characters for various Cherokee syllables.

25 Sequoyah Sequoyah’s system of written communication for the Cherokee language became known as Sequoyah’s Talking Leaves.

26 Knots on Counting Rope Read or watch the video on Knots on Counting Rope. Discuss what disability the has? What did the knots on the rope represent? Did the boy’s life represent the saying “Where there’s a will there’s a way.”? What did the boy and Sequoyah have in common?

27 Timeline Rope Students will each be given yarn to make a timeline of important events in their lives. For example tying a knot for their birth or first day of kindergarten. Later students will partner up to take turns retelling their life events.


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