Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Health Professions Network. Vision: HPN is the recognized voice of the collective associations of allied health professions Mission: HPN is a forum that.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Health Professions Network. Vision: HPN is the recognized voice of the collective associations of allied health professions Mission: HPN is a forum that."— Presentation transcript:

1 Health Professions Network

2 Vision: HPN is the recognized voice of the collective associations of allied health professions Mission: HPN is a forum that advocates, collaborates, communicates and disseminates information on behalf of allied health professions to promote effective care, lower cost, and better health for patients in the United States.

3 What can we as the Allied Health community do, in a collective and collaborative manner, to promote, develop, and strategically place allied health professionals in more critical roles to deliver the “Triple Aim:” Improve the experience of care for individuals Improve population health Lower per capita costs

4 The Changing Face of Workplace Systems

5 Healthcare Providers Disruptive Innovation Continues: 1980’s: DRG’s, EMTALA, “multi’s” Emergence and growth of “for profit” structures and systems. Dynamic tensions arise in education and providers 1990’s-2000’s: Reengineering and Restructure Models of care show changes to various delivery processes Demographics of demands vs. existing programs/new needs 2010’s-2020’s: Chaos to Creation, Accelerated Evolution Current chaos has been building for several years Major shifts will occur and current structures will not come back Cost and quality pressures are driving the change

6 Healthcare Providers Redesign of how it’s delivered, less emphasis on who Emphasis on primary and preventative care Current labels and structures: Accountable Care Organizations (ACO’s) Integrated delivery systems Coordinated Care Evidence based medicine What does it look like?? Where is it going ??

7 Healthcare Providers Major Shift from Episodic Care to Population Health Management Volume to value Quantity to quality Events to outcomes Preserve the core business and stimulate the transition Volume based model that is still working to see how money will flow to the new model (business model migration) Larger scale systems will emerge

8 Healthcare Providers Major Shift from Episodic Care to Population Health Management (Quantity to Quality, Events to Outcomes) Massive data integration, analysis, and management Transaction oriented to intelligence oriented Analysis of small percentage that incur largest expense dollars Analysis of effectiveness of provider programs Development of structure for new/changing programs Document the value/cost per delivery of service

9 Healthcare Providers Major Shift from Episodic Care to Population Health Management; (Quantity to Quality, Events to Outcomes) Massive data integration, analysis, and management Community and public health issues/treatment Disease management (chronic and selective) Targeted services Eldercare Programs Patient Centered Medical Home Physician acquisition and engagement; leadership roles Wellness programs End of life care

10 The Changing Face of the Workforce

11 : Occupational Volume Growth Occupation Registered Nurses Physicians Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics; January, 2012 New 712, ,000 Vacant 495, ,000 Total 1,207, ,000 1,512,000

12 : Occupational Volume Growth Occupation Registered Nurses Physicians Home Health Aides (ST,OJT) Nursing Aides, Orderlies, Attendants (LT 1) Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses (1) Medical Assistants (UT 1) Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics; January, 2012 New 712, , , , , ,000 Vacant 495, , , ,000 *227,000 81,000 Total 1,207, ,000 1,512, , , , ,000 1,974,000

13 : Occupational Volume Growth Occupation Registered Nurses Physicians Home Health Aides (ST,OJT) Nursing Aides, Orderlies, Attendants (LT 1) Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses (1) Medical Assistants (UT 1) Pharmacy Technicians (2) Pharmacists (6-8) EMT’s/Paramedics (UT 2) Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics: January, 2012 New 712, , , , , , ,000 70,000 75,000 Vacant 495, , , ,000 *227,000 81,000 58,000 *70,000 46,000 Total 1,207, ,000 1,512, , , , , , , ,000

14 : Occupational Volume Growth Occupation Laboratory Technicians (2) /Technologists (4) Physical Therapists (6-7) Radiologic Technicians/Technologists (UT 2) Medical Records/HI Technologists (2) PT Aides (ST, OJT) / Assistants (2-3) Occupational Therapists (6) Respiratory Therapists (2-4) Speech/Language Pathologists (6) Physician Assistants (6) Surgical Technologists (UT 2) Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics; January, 2012 New 43,000 77,000 61,000 38,000 51,000 36,000 31,000 29,000 25,000 18,000 Vacant *64,000 24,000 34,000 36,000 18,000 21,000 22,000 23,000 16,000 Total 107, ,000 95,000 74,000 69,000 57,000 53,000 52,000 41,000 34,000 3,084,000

15 : Occupational Volume Growth Occupation Registered Nurses Physicians “Entry Level” Positions Technical and Professional Positions Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics; January, 2012 New Positions 712, ,000 1,340, ,000 Vacant Positions 495, , , ,000 Total Positions 1,207, ,000 1,512,000 1,974,000 1,110,000 4,596,000

16 : Occupational Volume Growth Occupation Registered Nurses Physicians Practitioners and Technical (w/o Physicians & RN’s) Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners Technologists and Technicians Other Practitioners/Technical Positions Support Services Occupations Nursing and Home Health Aides OT and PT Assistants and Aides Other Support Positions Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics; January 2012 New 712, ,000 1,140,000 (396,000) (720,000) (23,000) 1,444,000 (1,019,000) (66,000) (359,000) Vacant 495, , ,000 (311,000) (577,000) (52,000) 598,000 (334,000) (23,000) (241,000) Total 1207, ,000 1,512,000 2,079,000 (707,000) (1,297,000) (75,00 0) 2,042,000 (1,353,000) (89,000) (600,000) 5,633,000

17 : Occupational Volume Growth Occupation Registered Nurses Physicians Practitioners and Technical (w/o Physicians & RN’s) Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners Technologists and Technicians Other Practitioners/Technical Positions Support Services Occupations Nursing and Home Health Aides OT and PT Assistants and Aides Other Support Positions Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics; January 2012 New 712, ,000 1,140,000 (396,000) (720,000) (23,000) 1,444,000 (1,019,000) (66,000) (359,000) Vacant 495, , ,000 (311,000) (577,000) (52,000) 598,000 (334,000) (23,000) (241,000) Total 1207, ,000 1,512,000 2,079,000 (707,000) (1,297,000) (75,00 0) 2,042,000 (1,353,000) (89,000) (600,000) 5,633,000

18 Where Do Health Care Workers Work ?? Setting Hospitals Physician Offices Workers 4,685,300 3,818,200

19 Where Do Health Care Workers Work ?? Setting Hospitals Physician Offices Nursing/Residential Care Home Health Care Services Outpatient Facilities Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics; January, 2012 Workers (2010) 4,685,300 3,818,200 3,129,000 1,080,600 1,077,000 13,790,100

20 Where Do Health Care Workers Work ?? Setting Hospitals Physician Offices Nursing/Residential Care Home Health Care Services Outpatient Facilities Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics; January, 2012 Workers (2010) (2020) 4,685,300 5,563,600 3,818,200 5,209,600 3,129,000 3,951,000 1,080,600 1,952,400 1,077,000 1,471,200 13,790,100 18,147,800

21 Where Do Health Care Workers Work ?? Setting Hospitals Physician Offices Nursing/Residential Care Home Health Care Services Outpatient Facilities Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics; January, 2012 Workers (2020) (# - %) 5,563, K–19% 5,209,600 1,391K-36% 3,951, K-26% 1,952, K-81% 1,471, K-37% 18,471,800 4,358K-32%

22 Thoughts for Future Changes: “There is no way you can have a substantial change in the work PLACE and delivery systems for health care without a resulting impact on the work FORCE and skill sets that deliver the care.” “It’s a call for right skill sets, not necessarily a job title, to be in the right place at the right time to provide the right care”

23 A Workforce for Health, Not a Health Workforce Existing workers shifting to new employment settings Existing workers taking on new roles in the new models Existing workers moving between needed specialties and changing services they offer New types of health professionals performing new functions (CMS Innovation Programs) Broader implementation of true team-based models of care and education Source: Erin Fraher, PhD MPP; Director, Program on Health Workforce Research & Policy; Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, UNC

24 CMS Innovation Program Grants Engage a broad set of innovation partners to identify and test new care delivery and payment models that originate in the field and that produce better care, better health, and reduced cost through improvement for identified target populations. Identify new models of workforce development and deployment and related training and education that support new models either directly or through new infrastructure activities. Support innovators who can rapidly deploy care improvement models (within six months of award) through new ventures or expansion of existing efforts to new populations of patients, in conjunction (where possible) with other public and private sector partners.

25 CMS Innovation Program Grants Lean Practice Redesign Specialist Patient Navigator Parent Navigator Community Health Navigators Patient Advocate Care Team Coordinator Care Transition Specialist Community Health Advocates Personal Care Advisor/Attendant Living Skills Specialist Peer Health Workers/Coaches Transition Guide/Coordinator Grand Aides (Certified) Health Improvement Specialist Community Health Worker Evaluation Specialist Interdisciplinary Team Members Enrollment Specialist Qualitative Interviewers/Specialists Panel Manager Multi-cultural Specialist Care Transition Team Patient and Family Activators Investigators Comprehensive Care Giver Community Coordinators Primary Care intensivists Peer Wellness Coaches Outreach Workers Health Care Economist

26 A Few Questions: What is the specific competencies, activities, and key tasks performed by each of these new roles? How will competencies be determined? How will effectiveness be measured? How are the workers going to be educated? Where will the education and training take place? What is the source and training for the workers? Regulations: state licensure or private sector credentials? Are we concerned about consistency across the board?

27 What About Management??

28 General Management Overview Long term “Baby Boomer” managers and executives retiring or phasing back / out Good news / bad news situation: experience isn’t there, but neither are values and relationships CEO’s being replaced by physicians and outsiders Traditional progressive managers being replaced by innovative risk takers creating new markets. New manager and executive positions /titles emerging along with the new delivery systems

29 What About Nurses?? What are the current trends for nurses in existing systems? Solidifying their positions in existing provider structures Already in positions to move on up to new/expanded roles Moving to bigger and more expansive responsibilities Status somewhat tempered by financial leaders and constraints Reallocation of resources for existence and new programs in absence of increases in revenue (revenue vs. expenses) What will be the role of nurses in the new systems?

30 IOM Recommendations: Remove scope-of-practice barriers. Expand opportunities for nurses to lead and diffuse collaborative improvement efforts. Implement nurse residency programs. Increase the proportion of nurses with a baccalaureate degree to 80 percent by Double the number of nurses with a doctorate by Ensure that nurses engage in lifelong learning. Prepare and enable nurses to lead change to advance health. Build an infrastructure for the collection and analysis of interprofessional health care workforce data.

31 So What’s Our Problem??

32 We Need to Talk !!!

33 NN2h2p

34 HOSANCHSE

35 NN2h2p HOSANCHSE

36 ASAHPRegulatory NN2h2p HOSANCHSE

37 NOSORHState WorkForce BoardsAHEC ASAHPRegulatory NN2h2p HOSANCHSE

38 ProvidersProfessionsLabor GroupsPayors NOSORHState WorkForce BoardsAHEC ASAHPRegulatory NN2h2p HOSANCHSE

39 ProvidersProfessionsLabor GroupsPayors NOSORHState WorkForce BoardsAHEC ASAHPRegulatory NN2h2p HOSANCHSE HRSADOL/DOEFunding Groups CMS

40 HPN ProvidersProfessionsLabor GroupsPayors NOSORHState WorkForce BoardsAHEC ASAHPRegulatory NN2h2p HOSANCHSE HRSADOL/DOEFunding Groups CMS

41 What Can We Do…….. Create a “same page” for all of us to get on for going forward? What areas can we start with? What barriers can we work on?

42 What Can We Do…….. Create a “same page” for all of us to get on for going forward? What areas can we start with? What barriers can we work on? Create our version of the “education pipeline”? What can/should we “standardize” and how? How can we take our efforts “across the board”? Who can/should be the driver/coordinating body for all of this?

43 What can we as the health care community do, in a collective and collaborative manner, to promote, develop, and strategically place all health care professionals in more critical roles to deliver the “Triple Aim:” Improve the experience of care for individuals Improve population health Lower per capita costs

44

45 Presented by: Lynn Brooks Health Professions Network (406) Charleston, SC January 28, 2015


Download ppt "Health Professions Network. Vision: HPN is the recognized voice of the collective associations of allied health professions Mission: HPN is a forum that."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google