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Effective Interpersonal Communication: “Why Can’t You Think and Act Like Me?” Communication Basics Generational Differences Coaching and Mentoring.

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Presentation on theme: "Effective Interpersonal Communication: “Why Can’t You Think and Act Like Me?” Communication Basics Generational Differences Coaching and Mentoring."— Presentation transcript:

1 Effective Interpersonal Communication: “Why Can’t You Think and Act Like Me?” Communication Basics Generational Differences Coaching and Mentoring

2 Communication Any act by which one person gives to or receives information from another person. Sender—Sends a message Receiver—Receives the message and processes the information

3 The Communication Process Model NOISE SENDER RECIEVER CHOOSES A MESSSAGE ENCODES THE MESSAGE CHOOSES THE CHANNEL MESSAGE DECODES THE PROVIDES FEEDBACK

4 Communication The WAY we communicate establishes the NATURE of our relationships.

5 Types of Communication  Verbal  Oral  Non-Verbal  Facial Expressions  Body Gestures  Symbolic  Signals

6 WHAT you say VERBAL HOW you say it TONE HOW you act/react BODY LANGUAGE Communication Basics

7 WHAT vs. HOW “I didn’t say you were ugly.” “I didn’t SAY you were ugly.” “I didn’t say YOU were ugly.” “I didn’t say you were UGLY.”

8 Statistics  Humans have 5 times more capacity to listen than to speak.  4/5 of our minds have the opportunity to wander while we are listening to someone else.

9 Statistics  47% of our time is spent writing, typing, speaking or reading  53% of our time is spent listening to others  More than 1/2 of our time communicating is spent listening  Only 30% of what was said is retained  Only 1/2 of that is remembered

10 Active Listening  Focus on the person speaking  Eliminate distractions  Listen for feeling Active Listening

11  Content  Listen for details  Question  To clarify  Paraphrase  Repeat without parroting

12 Effective Listening    Typing, talking, texting, etc…  Make eye contact  Watch body language  Ask open-ended questions

13 Listening Barriers  Inattentiveness  Closed-mindedness  Selective hearing  Excessive talking  Judgmental “mind set”  Unjustified inferences

14 Effects on Communication  Feelings  Beliefs  Opinions  Mood  Values  Ethics  Emotions  Background  Distractions

15 Communication Barriers  Language  Economic status  Disability  Educational background  Age

16 Communication Barrier: Perception How you perceive a message can be a communication barrier

17 Communication and Building Relationships I wait until others have finished talking before I speak; I don’t interrupt. I listen to understand the other person before I give my opinion or response. I maintain an open mind in most discussions. I seek and consider other people’s opinions. I spend time planning important communications, written or oral.

18 Dimensions of Diversity

19 Diversity = Cultural Differences  Biologically we are all the same.  The differences between people, groups of people, communities and populations are their cultural differences: Differences in values, beliefs and world views Differences in values, beliefs and world views Differences in perception, behaviors, actions and interactions Differences in perception, behaviors, actions and interactions

20 Culture is the Totality of Our:  Values  Beliefs  Customs  Behaviors  World Views

21 What Do we Know? What Do we Know? Diversity goes beyond race and gender Diversity goes beyond race and gender Humans resists change Humans resists change Humans find comfort and trust in likeness. We are ethnocentric. Humans find comfort and trust in likeness. We are ethnocentric.

22 Diversity Exercise

23 Generational Differences: Working With Generations Purpose: To increase the amount of workplace interaction among employees of different ages.

24 Baby Boomers ( )  Service oriented  Dedicated to/primary loyalty: Career  Optimistic  Competitive  Uncomfortable with conflict  Willing to work long and hard  Work ethic: Driven

25 Baby Boomers Childhood  Assassinations JFK—1963 JFK—1963 MLK—1968 MLK—1968  Vietnam—1965  Man on the Moon—1969  The Pill—1960

26  Acknowledge experience, dedication, and length of service  Seek their help and advice with issues involving the workplace  Strike a balance between s/voic s (impersonal) and face-to-face meetings  Overly sensitive to feedback  Judgmental of those who see things differently Supervising a Baby Boomer

27 Generation X ( )  Multi-tasked  Flexible hours  Informal work environments  Family-oriented  Fun  Work ethic: Balanced  Tech savvy  Loyalty: Family/personal needs

28 Generation X Childhood  MTV—1981  Challenger Disaster—1986  AIDS—1984  “Latch Key Kids”

29 Supervising a Generation X  Acknowledge their talents and expertise  Web-based training  Keep material brief and easy to read  Understand and honor their need for a balance of work and personal life. “We want you to have a life.”

30 Supervising a Generation X (Cont’d)  Stress upcoming organizational changes  This group is not afraid to ask questions  Give them lots to do and the freedom to do it

31 Baby Boomer vs. Generation X Baby Boomer Loyal to job 3 careers Difficult time with change Generation X Family-oriented 8-10 careers Cause of change (New ideas)

32  Confident  Achievement  Sociable  Street smart  Tech savvy  Have problems dealing with difficult people  Self-assured  Work ethic: Ambitious Generation Y ( )

33 Generation Y’s Childhood  Oklahoma City Bombing  The Internet  Clinton/Lewinsky scandal  Columbine High School Massacre  September 11, 2001

34 Supervising a Generation Y  Acknowledge their talents and fresh perspectives  Allow plenty of orientation time  Create a clear, realistic picture of work environment  Spell out expectations and goals  Be open to new and different ways of working  Keep communications short, clear, direct, and specific

35 Stereotyping  Appearance  Speech  Rumors  Religion

36 OUCH! That Stereotype Hurts Video

37

38 Supervisors Roles in Coaching and Mentoring

39 Coaching & Mentoring Coaching is used when there is a well- defined goal that is based on improving skills and performance. Mentoring is valuable for career development, providing general guidance, setting and achieving goals, making decisions or facilitating problem solving.

40 Key Principles of Coaching & Mentoring  Listen actively  Build trust  Determine goals  Encourage  Manage the relationship

41 Coaching & Mentoring Coaching is a method of directing, instructing and training a person or group of people, with the aim to achieve some goal or develop specific skills.

42 Coaching and Mentoring  Mentoring refers to a personal developmental relationship in which a more experienced or more knowledgeable person helps a less experienced or less knowledgeable person. personal developmentalpersonal developmental

43 Characteristics of Coaching  It consists of one-to-one developmental discussions.  It provides people with feedback on both their strength and weaknesses.  It is essentially a non-directive form of development.

44 Characteristics of Coaching  It focuses on improving performance and developing/enhancing individual’s skills.  Personal issues may be discussed but the emphasis is on performance of work.

45 Coaching for Success  Do I coach my employees to help them achieve success in what they do?  Do I provide one-on-one sessions with each person who reports to me?  Do I help others to be self-aware of the areas they need to improve or develop?  Do I support the goals set by individuals that I supervise?

46 Coaching for Success (cont’d)  Do I help employees to be accountable for their goals and performance?  Do I deal openly, constructively and promptly with negative performance issues?  Do I really listen to understand the concerns of others?  Do I encourage and ask for feedback on my own performance from my employees?

47 What is a Mentor? A Mentor is usually more experienced and more qualified than the “mentee”. A mentor is often a senior person in the organization who can pass on knowledge and experience and open doors to otherwise out-of-reach opportunities.

48 Mentoring is:  An ongoing relationship  Can be more of a casual setting  Is intended to meet the needs of the “mentee”  Focuses on career and personal development  Agenda is set by the mentee, with the mentor providing support and guidance to prepare them for future roles

49 Inspiring Employees to Motivate Themselves  Shared concept/vision  Purpose agreement  Team thinking  Sensitivity  Free discussion  Team-set goals  Assist with challenges

50 Overcoming Obstacles  Learn to say “NO” with tact State your objection State your objection Use “I” to describe your feelings Use “I” to describe your feelings Propose an alternative action Propose an alternative action  Learn resiliency Be positive under pressure and stress Be positive under pressure and stress Overcome adversities Overcome adversities Bounce back from setbacks Bounce back from setbacks

51 Coaches seldom mentor, but mentors often coach!

52 At the End of the Day…  Am I consistent?  Do my employees believe what I say?  Do they perceive me as competent to carry out what I say?  Do they perceive me as looking out for them?

53 New Golden Rule Treat people how THEY want to be treated!

54 Effective Communication is the solution to almost everything in this world.

55 The Importance of New Employee Orientation Presented by: Selestria Guy 25 May 2011

56 NEW EMPLOYEE ORIENTATION To ensure new employees receive a consistent message with regard to: To ensure new employees receive a consistent message with regard to: Goals Goals Mission Mission Culture Culture Benefits Benefits Expectations Expectations. Responsibilities

57 PURPOSE (continued) To provide a structured process to help the new employee function effectively in their new role To provide a structured process to help the new employee function effectively in their new role To foster individual, organizational and community effectiveness in improving public health To foster individual, organizational and community effectiveness in improving public health

58 ORIENTATION GOALS Provide needed information Provide needed information Provide access to resources Provide access to resources Assist in their transition to their new Assist in their transition to their new position position Help them feel a part of the ADH team Help them feel a part of the ADH team

59 The ADH Orientation Process Orientation begins the first day of employment and continues throughout the first year.

60 Orientation to ADH & PH Begins with a two day program Delivered face-to-face and via video conference Delivered face-to-face and via video conference Scheduled within their first 2 weeks Scheduled within their first 2 weeks Includes a Welcome from Dr. Halverson Includes a Welcome from Dr. Halverson Introduces the Orientation Checklist (HR-30) Introduces the Orientation Checklist (HR-30)

61 Orientation for New Employees Welcome ADH Mission & Vision Intro to Public Health The Press and You Human Resources Preparedness and You Continuing Ed & Training ADH Information Technology Benefits and Payroll Basic Blends – Day Two

62 Orientation for New Employees Equal Employment Opportunities (EEO) Grievance Process Sexual Harassment HIPAA Freedom of Information Act ID Badges, Parking Decals Timesheets and CATMAn

63 New Employee Orientation Checklist Policy Number (HR-30) List of topics to be completed Time frame for completion Course ID numbers for courses on A-TRAIN Areas for supervisor and new employee to sign and date

64 Section 1 New employee information

65 Section 2 Training tasks to be completed within

66 Section 3 Topics your supervisor will review with you. Additional space is provided to include other topics at the discretion of the supervisor

67 Section 4 To be completed at the end of your six month probationary period Includes a space for questions and comments Signed and dated by both employee and supervisor

68 Section 5 You are to complete this section with your employee at the end of their 12 month. Again the employee and the supervisor need to sign and date this section. The supervisor will provide a completed copy to the employee and maintain the original in their personnel file. This is the time for the new employee to again ask questions and discuss their job and their goals.

69 Methods of Delivery Face-to-Face Face-to-Face Video Conference Video Conference Intranet & Internet Intranet & Internet On-line via A-TRAIN On-line via A-TRAIN

70 What is A-TRAIN ? Distance learning network Links for training to improve public health Training & information for our employees Variety of instructional media

71 ORIENTATION PROVIDERS Agency representatives Agency representatives Supervisors Supervisors Existing employees Existing employees

72 Andrew Hradesky Phone: Orientation Contact Communications Internal – Dianne Woodruff Phone: Media – Ann Wright or Ed Barham Phone: Human Resource Contact Helen Ticey Phone: Key Contacts for Orientation Questions A-TRAIN Contact Selestria Guy Phone:

73 Who Works in Public Health? training experience background education Individuals with diverse

74 QUESTIONS


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