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THE 21st CENTURY WORKPLACE

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1 THE 21st CENTURY WORKPLACE

2 “Businesses will increasingly pursue a second bottom line that has to do with the attention to the needs of employees and customers as well as shareholders … not as a return to the 1970’s idea of social responsibility, but as good business - an improved second bottom line (happy employees and customers) contributes to a healthy bottom line, profit.” Daniel Yankelovich, Chairman, DYG Source: The Second Bottom Line: Competing for Talent Using Innovative Workplace Design, 1998 Knoll/DYG

3 CURRENT SITUATION Employers are no longer in a position to change workplace rules to fit downsizing strategies: The domestic economy continues to be robust Unemployment is the lowest it’s been in 30 years The ‘baby bust’ is bringing fewer people into the workforce 1990’s downsizing decimated the existing workforce Currently there is a growing shortage of qualified information and service workers

4 COST OF WORKER TURNOVER
In an attract and retain employee market, the cost of employee turnover can be extremely high: Workers earning: Replacement cost: $ 25,000 $ 37,500 50, ,000 100, ,000

5 Workplace Design Plays an Important Role in Company Performance, Holding Employees and Attracting New Talent

6 COMPANY PERFORMANCE Employees in high-performing companies rate their physical working conditions higher than their counterparts in all other companies Source: Competing for Talent The Hay Group, Inc., 1998

7 ATTRACT & RETAIN Slightly over half of the employees planning to leave their current employer are satisfied with their physical work conditions compared to 75% of employees planning to remain Source: Competing for Talent The Hay Group, Inc., 1998

8 FOCUS ON ATTRACT & RETAIN
As a result, employers will be increasingly obliged to pay more attention to workers’ needs, preferences, tastes and requirements to attract and retain the best and the brightest Source: The Second Bottom Line: Competing for Talent Using Innovative Workplace Design, 1998 Knoll/DYG

9 THE 21ST CENTURY WORKFORCE

10 BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY
Knoll, Inc. and DYG, Inc. have been working together for the past two years exploring workplace issues 1998: qualitative study (focus groups) with high tech workers 1999: national quantitative survey of office workers, part of the 1999 DYG SCAN® program

11 DYG SCAN® Syndicated research program since 1987 Tracks social values
Hopes, dreams, fears, beliefs about right and wrong Identifies trends Also studies: attitudes, lifestyles, behaviors, demographic trends

12 FOR KNOLL National survey: 1,500 interviews
An extensive battery of additional questions asked of office workers 350 full time office workers interviewed

13 TRENDS As we enter the 21st century, six critical trends will impact people’s attitudes towards work and how they work

14 TRENDS Demographic and Social Values
1. More diverse workforce on many levels 2. Breakdown of boundaries 3. Weakening of hierarchy 4. Simplification 5. Passionate pursuit of leisure 6. Personal freedom & control

15 TREND: MORE DIVERSE WORKFORCE
There are three significant demographic shifts taking place that are expected to dramatically influence the workplace of the 21st century More women in the workforce More ethnic and racial diversity An increase in the number of older workers as lifespans increase

16 TREND: MORE DIVERSE WORKFORCE
Diversity Issue #1 More women in the workforce Importantly, more women in much higher positions

17 MORE WOMEN IN THE WORKFORCE
Women Will Be the More-educated Gender % of Bachelors Degrees conferred to women 1971 43.4% 1981 49.8% 1998 55.4% % of Masters Degrees conferred to women 1971 40.1% 1981 50.3% 1998 55.0% Source: National Center for Education Statistics

18 MORE WOMEN IN THE WORKFORCE
Projections for Year 2007 9.2 million women enrolled in college 6.9 million men enrolled in college U.S. Dept. Of Education

19 MORE WOMEN IN THE WORKFORCE
Women Will Dominate The Professions Human Resources managers 43.9% 63.4% Accountants 38.7% 56.6% Economists 37.9% 52.2% Financial managers 38.6% 49.3% Executive/managerial (general) 32.4% 44.3% Lawyers 15.3% 26.6% Physicians 15.8% 26.2% Source: U.S. Census

20 HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION - 1999
61% married 33% single 6% unmarried couples 12% 6% 11% 7% 8% 21% Single-No kids at home Unmarried Couples Married, one income, no kids Retired couples Married, dual income, kids at home Married, dual income, no kids Married, one income, kids at home “Traditional” 18-30 yrs. old 31-59 yrs. old Over 60 yrs. old 14% Single Parents

21 MORE WOMEN IN THE WORKFORCE
This year in SCAN, we have examined the “sharpest expression” of this phenomenon Women who are: Well-educated (4+ years of college) Professional careers High earners (well above median for age) The “S class”

22 Satisfaction on the Job
WHY “S CLASS”? Self-assured Salubrious Sophisticated Respect Sacrifice Satisfaction on the Job

23 YOUNGER WOMEN RESHAPING WORKPLACE
74% of women aged agree: “Increasingly, I find that I will work only for employers who allow me a certain degree of flexibility, especially regarding work hours” The current flex-time boom was essentially female driven Source: DYG survey for LHJ, 1999

24 YOUNGER WOMEN RESHAPING WORKPLACE
69% of women aged agree: “In the future, I will only work for employers who let me have a real role in decision-making.” 78% among college-educated women Source: DYG survey for LHJ, 1999

25 WORKSPACE TIED TO JOB ENJOYMENT
Women more emphatic than men on this issue “Having a nice workspace is one of the key things that helps people feel better about their jobs and enjoy their jobs more” men 53% office workers women 65% (Strongly agree = 5 or 6 on a 6-point agreement scale)

26 BRINGING ASPECTS OF “HOME” TO WORK
Over half of female office workers with young children would be more satisfied at work if on-site day care were provided Half of all office workers would be more satisfied at work if a fitness center existed About one-in-three office workers would be more satisfied if an errand service were provided at work (dry cleaning, video rental, etc.) Young women are the driving force behind this trend…

27 TREND: MORE DIVERSE WORKFORCE
Diversity Issue #2 More ethnic and racial diversity in the workforce Especially among Generation-xers and teens

28 POPULATION PROJECTIONS
Year 2000 POPULATION PROJECTIONS (U.S. Census) Year 2020 Year 2050

29 AGE/ETHNICITY SKEW Americans aged 50-59 Americans about to enter the workforce are much more diverse Teens

30 TREND: MORE DIVERSE WORKFORCE
Diversity Issue #3 More older Americans in the workforce as productive lifespans increase

31 AGING AMERICA Population Increase: to 2030 Age Source: US Census

32 END OF TRADITIONAL RETIREMENT
80% of baby boomers plan to “work” during “retirement” Almost all at different jobs than they currently hold (“dream” jobs) Source: AARP Survey

33 SOCIAL TRENDS: THE WORK ENVIRONMENT

34 TREND: BREAKDOWN OF BOUNDARIES
Definition: Integration of all aspects of life; reduced compartmentalization Key Value: Balance Trend Leaders: Generation X (23-34 year olds) Source: DYG SCAN™

35 24 HOUR DAILY “FLUIDITY” At Home In the Car At Work “Playing” at work
Day care at work Dry cleaning at work Home office , Cell phone “Playing” at work Source: DYG SCAN™

36 WORKING AT HOME 37% Nearly 4 in 10 office workers work from their home at least occasionally (40+ employees)

37 TREND: WEAKENING OF HIERARCHY
Definition Less respect/faith in authority; at its worst, mistrust and cynicism regarding institutions Especially business Key Value Self-reliance Trend Leaders Universal Source: DYG SCAN™

38 (Strongly agree = top 2 box on a 6-point scale)
LOW FAITH IN BUSINESS “Businesses focus too much on profits and forget about their employees and customers” 61% strongly agree Anti-Business Pro-Business “Most businesses still care about the welfare of their employees and try to be fair to their customers” 29% strongly agree (Strongly agree = top 2 box on a 6-point scale)

39 AS A RESULT, A LOYALTY PROBLEM EXISTS
50% of office workers strongly agree: “Workers today have less loyalty to their companies than they used to.”  Short-term attachment  “Portable” skills a must  Resume always updated (Strongly agree = top 2 box on a 6-point scale)

40 AS A RESULT, A LOYALTY PROBLEM EXISTS
Men more likely to see loyalty problems than women “Workers today have less loyalty to their companies than they used to.” men 61% strongly agree women 45% (Strongly agree = top 2 box on a 6-point scale)

41 TREND: SIMPLIFICATION
Definition: Trade-offs in the name of reducing stress and overload Key Value: “Can’t do it all” (shouldn’t do it all) Trend Leaders: Generation X; women Source: DYG SCAN™

42 (Strongly agree = 5 or 6 on a 6-point agreement scale)
MORE WORK TO DO 64% of office workers strongly agree: “Companies expect a lot more from workers today than they used to - workers are expected to get more done and get it done faster” (Strongly agree = 5 or 6 on a 6-point agreement scale)

43 STRESS & SIMPLIFICATION
All Americans 61% strongly agree Office Workers 75% (mid/large businesses) “I often feel that there is not enough time in the day to do all the things I need to do” In response to high stress, Americans are simplifying their lives (Strongly agree = top 2 box on a 6-point scale)

44 SIMPLIFICATION: KEY DIRECTIONS
Prioritizing Rethinking choice “Achieving a balance” Personal Services Internet, PDAs For most, reducing effort in areas of life deemed less important For the upscale, buying your way out For the savvy, discovering easier ways to do things

45 TREND: SIMPLIFICATION
Where does work fall on the priority list? Sinking fast (less priority for work) “Make it before you are 30” mentality is strong among youth Leads to our next trend…

46 TREND: PASSIONATE PURSUIT OF LEISURE
Definition: Heightened status of leisure Key Value: Numerous Trend Leaders: Generation X and Boomers (particularly men) Source: DYG SCAN™

47 LEISURE DIRECTIONS Fun Restorative Interactive
“Spiritual” (broadly-defined) Fun Family Enhancing/ cultivating Active At-Home Leisure Source: DYG SCAN™

48 LESS WORK, MORE FUN For college-educated Generation-X and boomer men, knowing how to have fun is a greater symbol of success than working hard and making it in your career

49 LESS WORK, MORE FUN Which is a stronger symbol of success… 91% 8%
A man who achieves a more equal balance of work and play, but makes less money A man who works 70 hours a week 8% Source: DYG survey for Men’s Health

50 LESS WORK, MORE FUN Which is a stronger symbol of success… 62% 29%
A man who spends his spare time on the golf course 62% 29% One who spends his spare time trading stocks on the Internet Source: DYG survey for Men’s Health

51 TREND: PERSONAL FREEDOM AND CONTROL
Definition: 1. “Individualize” whenever and wherever possible to fit one’s personal style 2. Having a sense of freedom, autonomy and control in all aspects of life is increasingly important Trend Leaders: Upscale, educated Source: DYG SCAN™

52 EXAMPLES AFFECTING OUR INDUSTRY:
Individualize personal workspace Comfort, orientation,arrangement, adjustability On-line buying On your own time, on your own terms “Personal style” on all levels Diversity and “choice”

53 THE 21ST CENTURY WORKSPACE

54 WORK DESCRIPTION All Companies Companies w/40+ Empl.
Analytic (solve problems, analyze info.) 41% 46% Transactional (process forms, data) 32% 28% Supervisory (oversee others) 12% 13% Creative (generate new ideas) 7% 8% Not sure 7% 5%

55 WORK STYLE All Companies Companies w/40+ Empl.
Collaborative within the office (work with others in office) 42% 50% External orientation (work with others outside office) 37% 31% Solo producer (work alone) 20% 18%

56 The workscape today is extremely varied
No single format dominates

57 THE WORKSCAPE 37% in workstations 36% shared environment

58 WORKPLACE ISSUES

59 WORKSPACE TIED TO JOB ENJOYMENT
63% of office workers strongly agree: “Having a nice workspace is one of the key things that helps people feel better about their jobs and enjoy their jobs more” (Strongly agree = 5 or 6 on a 6-point agreement scale)

60 WORKSPACE TIED TO STATUS
55% of office workers strongly agree: “The workspace someone has is more or less related to the amount of status he or she has in the company” (Strongly agree = 5 or 6 on a 6-point agreement scale)

61 MYTH REFUTED The argument that workers care only about technology and not space or amenity issues in a workspace is refuted A segment of office workers do hold this view, however, they are a minority

62 IT’S NOT ALL ABOUT TECHNOLOGY
Only 34% of office workers strongly agree: “As long as I have all the equipment and technology that I need, I really don’t care how large my workspace is or how well furnished it is” (Strongly agree = 5 or 6 on a 6-point agreement scale)

63 MYTH REFUTED The argument that today’s office workers are so “on the go” that they care little about their workspace is also refuted

64 IT’S NOT ALL ABOUT TECHNOLOGY
Only 16% of office workers strongly agree: “I spend so little time in my workspace that I really am not that concerned about its size or furnishings” (Workers in 40+ employee companies) (Strongly agree = 5 or 6 on a 6-point agreement scale)

65 (Workers in 40+ employee companies)
WORKSPACE Most office workers are still in the office most of the time (Workers in 40+ employee companies)

66 WORKSPACE In the survey, we tested an extensive battery of workspace characteristics and for each asked if it would make them: More productive Less productive No impact on productivity More satisfied Less satisfied No impact on satisfaction

67 PRODUCTIVITY

68 No significant differences between men and women regarding workspace characteristics

69 GREATEST IMPACT ON PRODUCTIVITY
Technology Storage space Climate control Quiet space Space that can be personalized to your work style 70%+ say these would make them more productive

70 MODERATE IMPACT ON PRODUCTIVITY
Ergonomic chair Visually appealing workspace Lighting control Privacy Exterior window 50%-60% say these would make them more productive

71 LEAST IMPACT ON PRODUCTIVITY
Personal space for small meetings Large workspace Space for personal items “Big” is not necessarily better 40% or less say these will make them more productive

72 THE PRIVACY PARADOX Privacy was seen as crucial to one’s productivity by most workers However, there are significant differences based on one’s current workspace Those currently in private offices are much more likely to say privacy is crucial than are those in open spaces or workstations

73 (Workers in 40+ employee companies)
THE PRIVACY PARADOX Percentage who say a “private workspace” would/does make them “more productive” 58% All office workers In own office 74% Office workers 59% In cubicle 43% In open area (Workers in 40+ employee companies)

74 HYPOTHESES Self-selection: workers who need privacy will naturally gravitate to private offices Successful adaptation: workers in open workspaces have learned how to be productive with less privacy

75 THREE LARGE DIFFERENCES BY TYPE OF WORK
“Analytic” workers are more likely to say an ergonomically designed chair would improve their productivity More time sitting than others? “Supervisors” are more likely to say a private workspace would improve their productivity Need the privacy “Creative” workers place more import on exterior windows Aid the creative process?

76 JOB SATISFACTION

77 GREATEST IMPACT ON SATISFACTION
Technology Storage space Climate control Quiet space Space that can be personalized to your work style Visually appealing workspace Also topped the productivity list 70%+ say these would make them more satisfied

78 MODERATE IMPACT ON SATISFACTION
Ergonomic chair Lighting control Privacy Exterior window 50%-69% say these would make them more satisfied

79 LEAST IMPACT ON SATISFACTION
Personal space for small meetings Large workspace Space for personal items Again, “Big” is not necessarily better 47% or less say these would make them more satisfied

80 COMPARING SATISFACTION AND PRODUCTIVITY

81 SATISFACTION & PRODUCTIVITY
For most workspace characteristics tested, there is a high correlation between what workers say will make them more satisfied and more productive However, three workspace characteristics have a much greater impact on satisfaction than productivity Exterior window Space for personal items Visually appealing workspace Satisfaction is critical

82 DYG Scan Trend Identification
Two critical trends underscore the likelihood of the growing importance of the physical environment: The rising importance of quality of life in defining “The Good Life” The rising importance of “respect” in how companies are evaluated by workers, potential workers, and even customers Source: The Second Bottom Line: Competing for Talent Using Innovative Workplace Design, 1998 Knoll/DYG

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