Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The Generational Struggle From the Inside Out Blueprint for Success Brown Bag Session January 9, 2008 Kari S. Gabriel, M.Ed, APR VP of Communications Interact.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The Generational Struggle From the Inside Out Blueprint for Success Brown Bag Session January 9, 2008 Kari S. Gabriel, M.Ed, APR VP of Communications Interact."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Generational Struggle From the Inside Out Blueprint for Success Brown Bag Session January 9, 2008 Kari S. Gabriel, M.Ed, APR VP of Communications Interact Communications

2 Why It’s Important Multiple generations serving four generations in the marketplace We recruit, serve and depend on multiple generations Different values, experiences, styles, and attitudes create: –Misunderstandings –Frustrations –Disconnects Our biggest mistake is marketing to OURSELVES

3 Workplace Effects Increasing job pressure Increasing complaints “Vote with your feet” mentality

4 Outreach Effects Disconnect between what you love and what your target audience loves Difficult getting them to embrace the “Our Tools” (which are the correct tools) Frustration with media preparation & values Frustration with messaging creation (how to make them care)

5 Part One Who’s Who

6 The Generations Traditionalists Born Million Baby Boomers Born Million Generation X Born Million Gen Y / Echo Boom Millennial Born Million

7 The Generations

8 Critical Issues You are being held prisoner by Traditionals and Boomers You are being held prisoner by old concepts of communication The “I AM the Audience” Syndrome The “Field of Dreams” Syndrome

9 Who They Are TraditionalBoomerGen XMillennial Generation as Team “We” Generation as Icon “US” Defining Generation Generation as Individual “I” Rebels/ Influencers Generation as Philosophy “ALL” Conscience John Wayne Movies (All of Them) Star Trek (All of Them) Seinfeld The Simpsons Blossom Dawson’s Creek

10 What They Experienced TraditionalBoomerGen XGen Y World War II Korean War Pandemics Cold War Great Depression Radio Rock & Roll Protests/Riots Space exploration Vietnam War Racial Divides Sexual revolution Television Divorce Driven to independence AIDS Era Maturity Crack/Gangs/ Violence Downsized parents Information explosion Cell Phone Integration Understand Multi- layered information Brought up in the era of brands Unity Optimistic Reared in the era of psychology Recycling The Web

11 What it Feels Like

12 Part Two Reaching Them

13 Traditionalists

14 Age 63+ Senior staff & management Significant voting population Parents/Grandparents Major donors

15 Icons

16 Iconic Sayings “It’s not the easy thing, but it’s the right thing “Do the Right Thing”

17 The Problem With Them Is: They want it the way they want it. They were raised in a waste-not want-not world so they don’t want things that are cheap, wild or edgy

18 Marketing Inside Process, Protocol AND “Reasons” “Spelled Out” Always keep them informed Explain in terms of competition - they understand competition

19 Marketing Outside It’s for the children, the future It’s not the “easy” thing Pass it on - magnificent obsession

20 How to Reach Them Television News Opinion Leaders Newspaper & Print 39% of the audience 2 out of 5 social/civic organizations 40% of the audience

21 Speak to Their Sense of History

22 Speak to “It’s Not Too Late”

23 Baby Boomers

24 Boomers Ages Senior management & staff Rebels/Influencers Largest purchasing power generation The parents of Gen X & Y (49% of them)

25 Influential People

26 Iconic Saying “Make a Difference”

27 The Problem With Them Is: They think everything should speak to them… they ARE the audience. Many of them delude themselves with the idea that they are still “cool”

28 Marketing Inside “New & Unique” - Individualistic High ideals, setting the standard Puts them in the know

29 Marketing Outside Leaving a legacy Still blazing trails, still rebels The role model

30 How to Reach Them Television News Opinion Leaders Newspaper & Print Direct Mail 44% of the audience 2 out of 5 social/civic organizations 40% of the audience Most likely generation to read their mail, & their kids’s

31 Speak to Their Rebel

32 Generation X

33 Recognize They Are Tired

34 Influential People/Events

35 Iconic Sayings “Show me the money” “So not worth it” “Greed is good”

36 The Problem With Them Is: They don’t trust you, because it’s all baloney They actually are still cool and they know the rest of us are not They think most of us are chumps

37 Marketing Inside “Ask their opinion” - and then do it Give them unique opportunities Use direct, clear communication Reciprocity - You go first

38 Marketing Outside Savvy, cynical messages No hyperbole Pragmatic- prove it Sarcasm - throw stones at glass houses & talk to their inner monologue

39 How to Reach Them Television News (On the Comedy Channel) Lifestyle Events Web Permission Marketing Gen X and Y are >78% of the audience Family events & cultural currency events >86% are web savvy You deliver first

40 Speak to their world-weary, “get their own way” cynic

41 Speak to their practical (take no prisoner) side

42 What They Like (87% of Gen X) Broadband (50%) Surf for Content (Travel & Banking) Health (84%) IM (52%) TM (44%) Function not fun Content consumers Dropping landlines in record numbers

43 Big Issue Their lives are overly complex… so looking for simplification and function Offer them products & services that simplify

44 Market Death Make them stand in lines Be condescending Warm fuzzy media No cookie trails in websites

45 Gen Y

46 How Different? Gen Y versus Gen X

47 How Different? Gen Y versus Boomer

48 Influential People/Events

49 Iconic Sayings “Been There. Done That. Got the T- Shirt” “Think Globally, Act Locally” “SNF” (hint: so not…….) “Seriously?” “Seriously.”

50 The Problem With Them Is: They trust you, but they HAVE to go where their friends are going. They are partly passive and party assertive… think light switch

51 Marketing Inside Group events focusing on the herd - think social Digital communication - rather than F2F Make it FUN

52 Marketing Outside Two-fers & Value No hyperbole Fun, clever, authentic Build on cool and control Experiential versus safe

53 How to Reach Them Television Web Permission Marketing Absolutely target (By cable/by show) <10% are not web-dependent Offer value in groups Digital World They are the leading producers of digital content

54 Speak to their “Imagination”

55 Big Issue Their brains are wired for …. complexity

56 What They Like (87% of Gen Y) Y-rless Surf for fun (younger = greater) Integrate web & cell IM (75% do it & 66% do it daily) TM (54% do it & 60% do it daily) Interactivity (games) Instant gratification Self expression & personalization Males are mobile and hard to reach

57 What They Like (Specifically) 47% download music 15% maintain a blog 71% online banking 9% pod or vod cast 68% have multiple s 42% keep their.edu active 64% look for viral video 73% prefer an /web alumni NL 2005 Y2M

58 Market Death No web service or web based messaging No complexity in website Traditional media One2One messaging that ignores the group

59 Mindset List Beloit College - Wisconsin ~pubaff/mindset/

60 The Class of 2011… The Berlin Wall - what’s that? There has always been Diet Coke They have always had cable Thongs no longer come in pairs and slide between the toes Michael Jackson has always been white. They have always had Nelson Mandela has always been free Stores have always had scanners at the check out Jack Nicholson is mainly known as “The Joker” Bill Gates has always been worth a billion dollars (or so)

61 Your Dilemmas Marketing to multiple generations Consistent messages across multi-generations

62 Strategic ambiguity Cross-Generational Marketing Elements Identity is based on existing attitudes in audience Differentiation is based on reframing It must inspire internally It must stick - in different dark minds Constructive ambiguity

63 Convince the insider Boomers to listen (and be fair) Segment your message and media Make your website using POD’s Be strategically & constructively ambiguous How to Rule

64 Statistics on Media Usage From Interact’s Annual Media Preferences Study

65 Recommended Reading

66

67 Thank You! Kari S. Gabriel, M.Ed., APR Vice President of Communications Interact Communications o c

68 Roberta Smith (Traditionalist) is a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor and Supervisor for the State of Montana, DPHHS. She has been with the Department for 3.5 years, but in the Rehabilitation field for 23 years, since obtaining CRC. Her specialty is providing services for hearing impaired/deaf individuals. Ron Pilsch (Traditionalist/Baby Boomer) is a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor for the State of Montana and has provided his expertise for 20+ years. For the past 30 years he has owned and operated an excavation company and is also a Vietnam era veteran. Chanda Hermanson (Generation Xer) is a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor for the State of Montana and has worked in that capacity for the past 2 years. She recently completed her Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling from Utah State University. She works with individuals in Flathead and Lake Counties who have disabilities and barriers in regards to employment. Panelists


Download ppt "The Generational Struggle From the Inside Out Blueprint for Success Brown Bag Session January 9, 2008 Kari S. Gabriel, M.Ed, APR VP of Communications Interact."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google