Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Talk radio. Well, right-wing radio is niche entertainment for the spiritually unattractive. It succeeds because a substantial segment of the right-wing.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Talk radio. Well, right-wing radio is niche entertainment for the spiritually unattractive. It succeeds because a substantial segment of the right-wing."— Presentation transcript:

1 Talk radio

2 Well, right-wing radio is niche entertainment for the spiritually unattractive. It succeeds because a substantial segment of the right-wing rank and file enjoys listening, hour after hour, as smug, angry, disdainful middle-aged men spew raw contempt at reified enemies, named and unnamed. The radiocons seldom offer analysis or argument. To the chronically resentful, they offer the sadistic consolation of an endless sneer—at weaklings, victim-group whiners, cultural snobs, Hollywood hypocrites whose hearts bleed for the downtrodden though they themselves are rich and privileged, feminists, environmentalists, and, of course, “liberals,” defined as the Clintons, other members of the “Democrat Party,” and persons suspected of thinking that the state ought to help correct for various kinds of unfairnesses or calamities (economic, racial, climatic, medical) or of attaching themselves to some identity other than or in addition to “American” (black, gay, foreign, all humanity). Hendrik Hertzberg, 8/4/2003

3 By contrast, most noncons—most people, for that matter—do not regard politics as entertainment. They regard it as politics. They wouldn’t think it was fun to listen to expressions of raw contempt for conservatives—oh, maybe for a little while now and then, just as some occasionally tune in Limbaugh to give themselves a masochistic thrill or to raise their blood pressure, but not long and often enough to sustain an industry. When they want to be entertained, they watch comedy or drama. For the radiocon audience, political hate talk is comedy and drama. To their ears, it’s music.

4 Factors supporting the growth of talk radio Aging of the baby boomer generation –As people get older, they prefer talk more Technology –Development of FM radio displaced AM in profitable suburbs –“The mass exodus of listeners from AM to FM over the last 20 years,” wrote Broadcasting in August l990, “has left some plus stations scrambling to keep from being in the red—or, worse yet, going dark.” –Talk radio is, in the minds of some, the savior of AM. –Satellites—syndication –800 numbers End of the Fairness Doctrine

5 An available market A significant segment of the American public was disaffected with regard to the mainstream media, its secular outlook and its critique of the Republican presidents and conservatives in general Rush Limbaugh was able to tap into that disaffection and became exceedingly successful

6 WABC talk radio

7 Audience for Talk--Gender Source: Talk Radio Research Project (nonscientific estimates) Talkers Magazine 2008

8 Source: Pew

9 Audience for Talk--Education Source: Talk Radio Research Project (nonscientific estimates) Talkers Magazine 2008

10 Audience for Talk--Income Source: Talk Radio Research Project (nonscientific estimates) Talkers Magazine 2008

11 Audience for Talk--Age Source: Talk Radio Research Project (nonscientific estimates) Talkers Magazine 2008

12 Source: Pew Research Center for People and the Press Biennial News Consumption Survey Audience Segments in a Changing News Environment: Key news audiences now blend online and traditional sources (2008)

13 Audience for Talk--Ethnicity Source: Talk Radio Research Project (nonscientific estimates) Talkers Magazine 2008

14 Source: Pew

15

16 Audience for Talk--Ideology Source: Talk Radio Research Project (nonscientific estimates) Talkers Magazine 2008

17 Source: Pew Research Center for People and the Press Biennial News Consumption Survey Audience Segments in a Changing News Environment: Key news audiences now blend online and traditional sources (2008)

18

19 Audience for Talk—Political Party Source: Talk Radio Research Project (nonscientific estimates) Talkers Magazine 2008

20 Political Participation 74% said they voted in 2004 Source: Talk Radio Research Project (nonscientific estimates) Talkers Magazine 2008

21 Favorite Non-Radio News Source Source: Talk Radio Research Project (nonscientific estimates) Talkers Magazine 2008

22 Favorite Spectator Sports Source: Talk Radio Research Project (nonscientific estimates) Talkers Magazine 2008

23 Favorite Music Source: Talk Radio Research Project (nonscientific estimates) Talkers Magazine 2008

24 Charity giving Source: Talk Radio Research Project (nonscientific estimates) Talkers Magazine 2008

25 What listeners say they like about talk radio The number one like concerning radio talk shows is the opinions and perspectives offered, cited by 43 percent of talk listeners. Other likes, cited by between 20 and 25 percent of talk listeners, included the fact that people find talk radio entertaining (24%), the fact that talk radio is informative (23%), and/or the topics covered during the broadcasts. Additionally, one in ten (11%) talk radio listeners suggested that they like the hosts/commentators. Source: Radio and Television News Directors’ Foundation, 2000

26

27 Examples from categories of talk show likes: Opinions/Perspectives (43%) "When we've got two people with different opinions and they know their stuff, then they counter each other well. They're strong in their beliefs." "It mostly is things that I am interested in and I like people's opinions and why they think the way they think; maybe I would change my views." "I like the fact that you can get a conservative point of view and that they tell you that they are conservative. I like to hear what callers have to say.

28 "Entertaining (24%) "They are entertaining going to and from work." "They're funny. You get to hear different people have disputes with one another on topics." Informative (23%) "Sometimes you learn some interesting things. Sometimes people raise questions in my mind that I never thought of." "Tells us what is going on with current events." Hosts/Commentators (11%) "The personalities of the DJs and the topics they bring up. That about covers it." "The commentators' opinions. Discussion with special guests."

29 Talk radio listeners’ trust of media Source: National Election Study (NES) 2000

30 Conservative listeners of talk radio’s trust of media Source: National Election Study (NES) 2000

31 Preference for non-ideological news Despite the ideological bent of many of these talk show audiences, majorities of the shows’ viewers say they prefer to get political news from sources that don’t have a particular political point of view rather than sources that share their point of view. Rush Limbaugh--37% of listeners prefer to hear from someone sharing their view while 53% say they prefer news sources that don’t have a particular point of view. Stephen Colbert—only 15% of regular viewers of The Colbert Report say they prefer news sources that share their point of view, while 79% say they prefer sources without a political point of view. –Source: Source: Pew Research Center for People and the Press Biennial News Consumption Survey Audience Segments in a Changing News Environment: Key news audiences now blend online and traditional sources (2008)

32 Features of broadcast talk Less insulated from ratings demands than traditional news –Entertainment is paramount, so political news may be slighted Populist themes –Allow common people the opportunity to talk back to power Sometimes there is a contradiction between the two –Usually settled in favor of commercial interests

33 Features of broadcast talk “Propensity to make inflammatory statements about political figures, including ad hominem attacks against both individuals and groups” –“feminazis” –“radical environmentalists” –“National Association of Liberal Colored People”

34 Features of broadcast talk Combative tone Extreme, provocative statements at times Simplification of issues Focus on personalities, events

35 Features of broadcast talk Talk show hosts often try to get listeners to engage in certain political causes, letter- writing campaigns, etc. Talk show hosts, generally, are at more of a distance from politicians than the press is Talk show hosts maintain closer links to their audiences

36

37

38 Why radio talk is conservative-- Mayer Rush Limbaugh’s skills as an entertainer –There are many less skilled talkers and they are conservative as well –Claim assumes that there are 0 skilled liberals Liberal positions are more complicated and harder to explain in a sound-byte medium –There are plenty of overly simplistic left-leaning explanations of social problems Shock jocks are liberals and draw the audience that would go to clear ideological liberal talkers –A close analysis of politics of Howard Stern, etc. does not indicate a liberal viewpoint (Stern is more libertarian than anything)

39 Why radio is conservative Owners and managers are conservative and so they push a conservative agenda and hire conservative voices –Lack of ratings success of liberals has caused most firings, etc. –Clear Channel, etc. have tried putting liberals on but have not seen success Conservative voices are more popular –There are more conservatives than liberals –Conservatives in society think the mainstream media are liberal


Download ppt "Talk radio. Well, right-wing radio is niche entertainment for the spiritually unattractive. It succeeds because a substantial segment of the right-wing."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google