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Working with Millennials within Higher Education: Challenges and Opportunities Rachel Jessop: Helen Burdette: Rachel Jessop: Helen Burdette:

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Presentation on theme: "Working with Millennials within Higher Education: Challenges and Opportunities Rachel Jessop: Helen Burdette: Rachel Jessop: Helen Burdette:"— Presentation transcript:

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2 Working with Millennials within Higher Education: Challenges and Opportunities Rachel Jessop: Helen Burdette: Rachel Jessop: Helen Burdette:

3 Who are the Millennials?  Children of Boomers and Gen-Xers  Key dates:  GI: ; Silent: ; Boomer: ; X:  Millennial dates open to discussion  Millennials are the largest youth generation in history:  in the US there are 70 million millennials, which is 3 x the size of Generation X  There are many sub-groups within the Millennial Generation  Children of Boomers and Gen-Xers  Key dates:  GI: ; Silent: ; Boomer: ; X:  Millennial dates open to discussion  Millennials are the largest youth generation in history:  in the US there are 70 million millennials, which is 3 x the size of Generation X  There are many sub-groups within the Millennial Generation

4 Who are the Millennials?  Different names for the Millennial generation:  Net generation  Generation Y  Generation Me  The Thumb Generation  Echo-Boomers  Anti-Boomers  The Dotcoms  Paradoxical Generation  Different names for the Millennial generation:  Net generation  Generation Y  Generation Me  The Thumb Generation  Echo-Boomers  Anti-Boomers  The Dotcoms  Paradoxical Generation

5 The Millennial mindset  Wanted and Protected  Do what’s right for you  Just be yourself  You can be anything you want to be  Think global, act local  Find your match.com (when you’re ready!)  Leave no-one behind: the equality revolution  Expectation meets reality  The information-generation  Wanted and Protected  Do what’s right for you  Just be yourself  You can be anything you want to be  Think global, act local  Find your match.com (when you’re ready!)  Leave no-one behind: the equality revolution  Expectation meets reality  The information-generation

6 The Millennial mindset: statistics  Decline in organised religion  In Britain, fewer than 7% of those aged and 5% of those aged attend church.  In the USA, only 18% of attend religious services every week. The number of college freshmen who named no religious preference doubled between 1985 and  Self-expression acceptable: cosmetic surgery on the increase  According to a Grazia magazine survey in 2005, 25% of teenage boys would like to have cosmetic surgery, more than 40% of teenage girls have considered it.  Decline in organised religion  In Britain, fewer than 7% of those aged and 5% of those aged attend church.  In the USA, only 18% of attend religious services every week. The number of college freshmen who named no religious preference doubled between 1985 and  Self-expression acceptable: cosmetic surgery on the increase  According to a Grazia magazine survey in 2005, 25% of teenage boys would like to have cosmetic surgery, more than 40% of teenage girls have considered it.

7 The Millennial mindset: statistics  Lack of political engagement at national level  In the UK 2001 general election, only 53% of students aged voted, as compared to 78.5% aged  In the USA presidential election of 2008, citizens age 65 and older had the highest registration rate (79 percent) while those age 18 to 24 had the lowest (58 percent).  The youngest group also had the lowest voting rate (47 percent), while those age 45 and older had the highest turnout (about 70 percent).  Lack of political engagement at national level  In the UK 2001 general election, only 53% of students aged voted, as compared to 78.5% aged  In the USA presidential election of 2008, citizens age 65 and older had the highest registration rate (79 percent) while those age 18 to 24 had the lowest (58 percent).  The youngest group also had the lowest voting rate (47 percent), while those age 45 and older had the highest turnout (about 70 percent).

8 The Millennial mindset: statistics  The new British family  Nearly a quarter of children in 2007 (24%) lived with just one parent last year - treble the proportion recorded in  55% of women with children under five now work outside the home, compared with 25% in  Between 1996 and 2006 the number of cohabiting couples rose by 65 per cent from 1.4million to 2.3million.  The average age to get married in 2005 was 29.5 for women and 31.7 for men.  The average age for women giving birth in 2007 was 29.3 years, compared with 26.6 years in  The new British family  Nearly a quarter of children in 2007 (24%) lived with just one parent last year - treble the proportion recorded in  55% of women with children under five now work outside the home, compared with 25% in  Between 1996 and 2006 the number of cohabiting couples rose by 65 per cent from 1.4million to 2.3million.  The average age to get married in 2005 was 29.5 for women and 31.7 for men.  The average age for women giving birth in 2007 was 29.3 years, compared with 26.6 years in 1971.

9 The Millennial mindset: statistics  Over-optimistic  On average, students overestimate starting salaries by 10%.  In 2009, the number of graduate level vacancies will have fallen by 5% compared to  Anxious and depressed  1 in 10 children aged 1-15 has a mental health disorder and 1 in 5 young people experience a mental health problem in the course of a year.  Suicide remains the most common cause of death in men under the age of 35.  Students experience higher than average levels of anxiety and depression: 12% of male and 15% of female students experienced clinical depression (compared with one in ten of the general population).  Over-optimistic  On average, students overestimate starting salaries by 10%.  In 2009, the number of graduate level vacancies will have fallen by 5% compared to  Anxious and depressed  1 in 10 children aged 1-15 has a mental health disorder and 1 in 5 young people experience a mental health problem in the course of a year.  Suicide remains the most common cause of death in men under the age of 35.  Students experience higher than average levels of anxiety and depression: 12% of male and 15% of female students experienced clinical depression (compared with one in ten of the general population).

10 The Millennial mindset “…”  “ I ’ ve been brought up with the notion that I can have it all – the meaningful career and the family package ” Clare Hutchinson, Nottingham student, quoted in Impact issue 196, April 2009  “ I have always had the belief and principle that no mountain is too high to climb and with hard work and confidence in one ’ s own abilities, anything is possible. ” Nottingham student  “Let us be as egotistical, techno-obsessed and travel- savvy as we’d like because we have something the other generations lack: the belief we can do something different and one day change the world.” Samantha Brett, Quit the Gen Y bashing already! Cleo Magazine, April  “ I ’ ve been brought up with the notion that I can have it all – the meaningful career and the family package ” Clare Hutchinson, Nottingham student, quoted in Impact issue 196, April 2009  “ I have always had the belief and principle that no mountain is too high to climb and with hard work and confidence in one ’ s own abilities, anything is possible. ” Nottingham student  “Let us be as egotistical, techno-obsessed and travel- savvy as we’d like because we have something the other generations lack: the belief we can do something different and one day change the world.” Samantha Brett, Quit the Gen Y bashing already! Cleo Magazine, April 2009

11 Discussion  Example of challenges within your work place  Example of opportunities within your workplace  Changes made as a result of Millennials  Example of challenges within your work place  Example of opportunities within your workplace  Changes made as a result of Millennials

12 Working with Millennials in a University context “…”  “ Simply having a degree does not guarantee a graduate job and a silver plated salary. ” Dr John Jerrim, University of Southampton, quoted in the Times Higher Education, 23 April 2009  “ Student: ‘ I want you to re-mark my work. ’ Me (lecturer): ‘ Why is that? ’ Student: ‘ I was expecting a much higher mark. ’ Me: ‘ Have you read the feedback sheet I provided? ’ Student: ‘ No, it ’ s the mark I ’ m not happy with. ’” Comment by thedigger to Now is the age of the discontented, Times Higher Education, 4 June 2009  “Faculty members feel pressured to shorten lectures, increase group-discussion time, and ignore the "multitasking" student who is ing his friends in the back of the room -- all to attract and satisfy a generation that doesn't have the discipline of its predecessors.” Professor Naomi Baron, Linguistics professor at American University  “ Simply having a degree does not guarantee a graduate job and a silver plated salary. ” Dr John Jerrim, University of Southampton, quoted in the Times Higher Education, 23 April 2009  “ Student: ‘ I want you to re-mark my work. ’ Me (lecturer): ‘ Why is that? ’ Student: ‘ I was expecting a much higher mark. ’ Me: ‘ Have you read the feedback sheet I provided? ’ Student: ‘ No, it ’ s the mark I ’ m not happy with. ’” Comment by thedigger to Now is the age of the discontented, Times Higher Education, 4 June 2009  “Faculty members feel pressured to shorten lectures, increase group-discussion time, and ignore the "multitasking" student who is ing his friends in the back of the room -- all to attract and satisfy a generation that doesn't have the discipline of its predecessors.” Professor Naomi Baron, Linguistics professor at American University

13 Students as customers  Tuition fees  Students and parents blame staff for failures  Under funding  Tuition fees  Students and parents blame staff for failures  Under funding

14 Teaching & Learning  Lecturers’ comments are “just your opinion”  Which generation should adapt - us to them, them to us?  Death of traditional lecture?  Multi-tasking gone mad?  Lecturers’ comments are “just your opinion”  Which generation should adapt - us to them, them to us?  Death of traditional lecture?  Multi-tasking gone mad?

15 Exams and assessments  Cheating more prevalent  Entitlement to a 2:1  Reality of academic competition and experience  Cheating more prevalent  Entitlement to a 2:1  Reality of academic competition and experience

16 Graduation and ambitions  Lofty ambitions, starting salaries, career progression, work-life balance  It’s not what you know, who you know, but who you ARE  Mis-sold degrees and earning potential  “Friends” isn’t reality  Lofty ambitions, starting salaries, career progression, work-life balance  It’s not what you know, who you know, but who you ARE  Mis-sold degrees and earning potential  “Friends” isn’t reality

17 Millennials within a study abroad context “…”  “I wish that the Study Abroad Office gave us more advice of what to expect and helped us more with accommodation. All of us when we got here had no idea what it would be like looking for somewhere to live and its something that I really really wish I had known about.”  “Spanish would be better learned engaging with the people, maybe working in a bar, rather than studying.”  “Fourthly, I have to put my city of birth, my address since birth is Birmingham, but my actual birthplace is the town of Redditch, should I put Redditch?” (All quotes from University of Leeds students)  “I wish that the Study Abroad Office gave us more advice of what to expect and helped us more with accommodation. All of us when we got here had no idea what it would be like looking for somewhere to live and its something that I really really wish I had known about.”  “Spanish would be better learned engaging with the people, maybe working in a bar, rather than studying.”  “Fourthly, I have to put my city of birth, my address since birth is Birmingham, but my actual birthplace is the town of Redditch, should I put Redditch?” (All quotes from University of Leeds students)

18 Millennials within a study abroad context “…”  “I am writing because I am in the process of booking my ticket to Murcia and would like to know if I have to pay for extra luggage or whether allowances are made for ERASMUS students. At the moment I am only allowed 20kg on the plane and would like to know whether we receive any financial help from the university for the extra luggage.”  “A quick question in reply to this over application, when you say attach a passport photo does it have to be identical to the one in my passport, or just one which is eligible like you get done in those booths? thank you.”  “I am writing because I am in the process of booking my ticket to Murcia and would like to know if I have to pay for extra luggage or whether allowances are made for ERASMUS students. At the moment I am only allowed 20kg on the plane and would like to know whether we receive any financial help from the university for the extra luggage.”  “A quick question in reply to this over application, when you say attach a passport photo does it have to be identical to the one in my passport, or just one which is eligible like you get done in those booths? thank you.”

19 Working with millennials in a study abroad context  General good practice  Processes  Be prepared for “extra” information  Manage expectations  Remember non-traditional students  Be aware of financial realities  Use study abroad alumni  Flexibility  Communication methods & response time  General good practice  Processes  Be prepared for “extra” information  Manage expectations  Remember non-traditional students  Be aware of financial realities  Use study abroad alumni  Flexibility  Communication methods & response time

20 Marketing to outgoing students  Be aware that millennials are:  interested in products that satisfy their personal goals  Looking for learning opportunities  Desperate for career advice and advancement  Money aware  Not keen on long-term commitment  Work with alumni  Develop service learning & volunteering opportunities  Manage expectations & communication  Be aware that millennials are:  interested in products that satisfy their personal goals  Looking for learning opportunities  Desperate for career advice and advancement  Money aware  Not keen on long-term commitment  Work with alumni  Develop service learning & volunteering opportunities  Manage expectations & communication

21 Using technology  Use appropriate new technologies  Remember that s and websites are taken for granted  Information available 24/7  Make the most of automated responses, FAQs and instant messaging  Use Millennials’ knowledge and experience  Make information sessions interesting and relevant  Use appropriate new technologies  Remember that s and websites are taken for granted  Information available 24/7  Make the most of automated responses, FAQs and instant messaging  Use Millennials’ knowledge and experience  Make information sessions interesting and relevant

22 Working with US incomers Challenges:  US Higher Education is expensive and studying abroad is only a small part of this  Millennial phenomenon has existed much longer in US than in UK  Exchange pressures - need to ensure US students have a positive experience whilst not treating them differently to other incomers Challenges:  US Higher Education is expensive and studying abroad is only a small part of this  Millennial phenomenon has existed much longer in US than in UK  Exchange pressures - need to ensure US students have a positive experience whilst not treating them differently to other incomers

23 Working with US incomers Opportunities:  Pro-active  Ambitious  Technology savvy  Enthusiasm and volunteerism Opportunities:  Pro-active  Ambitious  Technology savvy  Enthusiasm and volunteerism

24 Working with Millennials’ parents Challenges:  Parents are older, more affluent, and parenting for longer  Helicopter parents / jet-fighters!  Who are they?  Children as an investment, parents want a return on their money  Students less able to problem solve Challenges:  Parents are older, more affluent, and parenting for longer  Helicopter parents / jet-fighters!  Who are they?  Children as an investment, parents want a return on their money  Students less able to problem solve

25 Working with Millennials’ parents Opportunities:  Parents as allies  Supportive of our field  For many, international exchange is a vital part of HE therefore parents prepare for this  Opportunity to globalise Boomers and Xers vicariously Opportunities:  Parents as allies  Supportive of our field  For many, international exchange is a vital part of HE therefore parents prepare for this  Opportunity to globalise Boomers and Xers vicariously

26 Conclusions…  Challenges  Technology  Ambition  Collaboration  Used to uncertainty in life  Opportunities  This generation are going to change the world  “We are not going to let the world down.” (Chaz Sshmitz, 16)  “My generation is one of the most confident and unique of the century.” (Robby Willey, 16)  “We have proved the critics wrong when they say the young aren’t old enough, capable enough, or smart enough to bring about change.” (Craig Kielburger, 17, Free the Children)  A global generation  Challenges  Technology  Ambition  Collaboration  Used to uncertainty in life  Opportunities  This generation are going to change the world  “We are not going to let the world down.” (Chaz Sshmitz, 16)  “My generation is one of the most confident and unique of the century.” (Robby Willey, 16)  “We have proved the critics wrong when they say the young aren’t old enough, capable enough, or smart enough to bring about change.” (Craig Kielburger, 17, Free the Children)  A global generation

27 Lessons  Comparisons are not helpful  Millennials are not wrong, just different, and they are our most challenging competitors!  Comparisons are not helpful  Millennials are not wrong, just different, and they are our most challenging competitors!


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