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Engaging the Multigenerational Workforce Susan Murphy, MBA, PhD Senior Consultant Claire Raines Associates Kathy Greco, LMSW, CEAP Director, Health & Performance.

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Presentation on theme: "Engaging the Multigenerational Workforce Susan Murphy, MBA, PhD Senior Consultant Claire Raines Associates Kathy Greco, LMSW, CEAP Director, Health & Performance."— Presentation transcript:

1 Engaging the Multigenerational Workforce Susan Murphy, MBA, PhD Senior Consultant Claire Raines Associates Kathy Greco, LMSW, CEAP Director, Health & Performance Initiatives ValueOptions

2 2 Agenda  The Business Case  Overview of the Generations  Workplace Implications  Best Practices  Generational Perspectives on the EAP and Typical Issues  Discussion

3 3 The Business Case  Competition for talent  More generations working side by side  Productivity and business results linked to work environment  Customers from all generations

4 4 Primary Aspects of Diversity Adapted from Workforce America! by Marilyn Loden & Judy Rosener

5 5 Generations 2007 & 2011 WWII Generation (Traditional Generation) born before plus3%5 million in plus1%2 million Baby Boom Generation (Post WWII Boom in Births: ) born %55 million in %46 million Generation X born %68 million in %69 million Millennial Generation (Generation Y) born %22 million in %40 million

6 6 Questions for Organizations  What is the generational composition of your current workforce?  What will the generational composition of your workforce be in 5 years?  What is the generational composition of your customer base?  What will the generational composition of your customer base be in 5 years?

7 7 Our Perspective and Values …are shaped by the world around us during our formative years.

8 8 WWII Generation

9 9 WWII Generation

10 10 WWII Generation

11 11 Baby Boom Generation

12 12 Baby Boom Generation

13 13 Baby Boom Generation

14 14 Generation X

15 15 Generation X

16 16 Generation X

17 17 Millennial Generation

18 18 Millennial Generation

19 19 Millennial Generation

20 20 How Parenting Differed WWIIBaby Boomer DisciplineDr. Spock SchedulesThrow away schedule ConformityLove & nurture, Strict obedience pamper & cherish “Spare the rod, spoil the child”Stay-at-home moms Generation XMillenial Parenting by proxyParental advocacy Working momsPut children first Latchkey childrenSoccer moms Soaring divorce ratesSupervision Autonomy & independenceStrictness on drugs, drinking, driving

21 21 Benefits of the Multigenerational Team  Can attract/retain talented people of all ages, more inclusive  More flexible  Can gain/maintain greater market share because reflect multigenerational market  Decisions are stronger, more broad-based with multiple perspectives  More innovative and creative  Can meet needs of diverse public and can relate more effectively

22 22 Root Causes of Conflict  Work ethic  Technology  Relationships  Outlook

23 23 Root Causes of Conflict (cont.)  Perspective  View of authority  Leadership

24 24 The Titanium Rule Do unto others, keeping their preferences in mind.

25 25 Communication  WWII Generation Logical, linear, conservative  Baby Boom Generation Personable, information = reward  Generation X Direct, straightforward, results-oriented  Millennial Generation Positive, motivational, personal goal-oriented

26 26 Turn-offs  WWII Generation Profanity, slang, poor grammar, disrespect  Baby Boom Generation Brusqueness, one-upmanship  Generation X Using time poorly, corporate-speak  Millennial Generation Cynicism, sarcasm, condescension

27 27 Motivation for WWII Generation  WORDS that motivate: “Your experience is respected here.”  REWARDS that motivate: Tangible symbols of loyalty, commitment and service  MANAGEMENT ACTIONS that motivate: Managers connect their actions to overall good of organization

28 28 Motivation for Baby Boomers  WORDS that motivate: “We need you. You can make a difference.”  REWARDS that motivate: Personal appreciation, promotion, recognition, status symbols  MANAGEMENT ACTIONS that motivate: Managers get them involved and show them how to make a difference

29 29 Motivation for Generation X  WORDS that motivate: “Do it your way.” “There is life beyond work.”  REWARDS that motivate: Free time, upgraded resources, opportunities for development, bottom-line results, certifications to add to resume  MANAGEMENT ACTIONS that motivate: Managers give them choices and let them work autonomously

30 30 Motivation for Millennials  WORDS that motivate: “We respect you here.” “What are your goals?”  REWARDS that motivate: Awards, certificates, tangible evidence of credibility  MANAGEMENT ACTIONS that motivate: Managers connect actions to their personal and career goals

31 31 Is Your Workplace Gen-Friendly? _There’s not just one type of successful person here. _On teams, we include a variety of perspectives. _We treat employees as customers. _We sometimes joke about our different perspectives. _We talk openly about what we want from our jobs. _We base policies on what customers/employees want.

32 32 Gen-Friendly (cont.) _We have a minimum of bureaucracy and red tape. _People who work here have the big picture along with specific goals and measures—and feel free to find their own best way of reaching them. _We expect the best from everyone. _We focus on retention every day.

33 33 12 Best Practices Companies that are most successful at recruiting and retaining across generations… 1.Study generational composition; use the information in many HR strategies. 2.Train about generations in a variety of formats. 3.Match workforce to customer base. 4.Include all generations on boards and councils.

34 34 12 Best Practices (cont.) 5.Support continuing education. 6.Reward managers for retention. 7.Reward performance and productivity. 8.Offer horizontal movement. Companies that are most successful at recruiting and retaining across generations…

35 35 12 Best Practices (cont.) 9.Plan for succession. 10.Offer mentoring programs. 11.Offer flexible scheduling. 12. Offer a wide variety of benefits. Companies that are most successful at recruiting and retaining across generations…

36 36 Questions?

37 37

38 38 Analysis  Developed profile in terms of: demographic characteristics lifestyle characteristics communication preferences  Identified patterns of substance abuse and related problems  Projected needs/behaviors in light of historic EAP and behavioral health care utilization patterns

39 39 Engage  Developed CD using multigenerational approach  Highlighted the unique issues and needs concerning each generational group, including pertinent workplace issues : mental health issues alcohol and substance abuse financial family (child care, elder care, etc.)  Provided information and tools to help employers address these issues: articles posters/brochures sample timelines

40 40 The Gen Y Perspective of the EAP  Predisposed to seek treatment only in crisis  Seek the services of the EAP less often than the general employee population  Of the Gen Y workers seeking assistance from the EAP, more tend to be female  Male employees more likely to receive services related to substance abuse

41 41 Typical EAP Problems Gen Y Members Experience  Financial issues Debt management Savings Loans and credit  Legal issues Traffic violations Drunk driving Criminal issues (such as assault) Child custody and support  Marital/family issues Communication Financial dependence Effective communication Healthy relationships Cohabitation  Medical issues Pregnancy Routine, preventive medical care Accidents  Mental health issues Depression Anxiety Appearance of long-term, chronic disorders, such as bipolar disorder and thought disorders (e.g., schizophrenia)  Substance abuse issues Binge drinking Experimentation with illicit drugs

42 42 The Gen X Perspective of the EAP  EAPs help employees balance work and life.  Gen X employees look to what the EAP can do for them.  Skill development and wellness seminars, work/life programs and workplace programs designed for flexibility will draw the attention of Gen X employees.

43 43 Typical EAP Problems Gen X Members Experience  Financial issues One-income families with children Savings  Legal issues Divorce Child custody and support  Marital/family issues Career vs. marriage and family Parenting roles Relationships  Medical issues Pregnancy Smoking-related health issues  Mental health issues Depression Anxiety Eating disorders  Substance abuse issues Marijuana Alcohol

44 44 The Baby Boomer Perspective of the EAP  Have driven the development of EAP services over the last 20 years  Broad-brush programs providing assistance with work stress, family issues, assessment for depression and anxiety, as well as grief and loss issues  Legal, financial and work/life services have been incorporated into many EAP services with the aim of assisting employees on a variety of aging- related topics

45 45 Typical EAP Problems Baby Boom Members Experience  Financial issues Savings and debt management Retirement planning  Legal issues Estate planning, wills and trusts Long-term care Issues of aging relatives  Marital/family issues Child and elder care Marital/family relationships  Medical issues Lifestyle issues Chronic illness  Mental health issues Depression Anxiety Self-esteem  Substance abuse issues Disease Prescription drug issues

46 46 The Traditional Generation Perspective of the EAP  Occupational alcoholism program  May not be aware of or be comfortable pursuing the broad spectrum of employee assistance services now available  Less likely to seek the services of the EAP  Likely to feel obliged to handle any personal concerns alone

47 47 Typical EAP Problems Traditional Generation Members Experience  Financial issues Retirement Long-term care Managing income and expenses  Legal issues Estate planning, wills and trusts Health care proxy and living wills  Marital/family issues Marital/family relationships  Medical issues Chronic disease Diseases of aging  Mental health issues Depression  Substance abuse issues Disease

48 48 Approach  Target interventions to specific human capital risks  Manage risks using resources efficiently  Offer employers solutions to engage the workforce  Build an environment that fosters employee resiliency

49 49 Expected Outcomes  Increased knowledge of needs and preferences of generational populations  Increased awareness of EAP services among targeted population  Increased EAP utilization among targeted population: Self-referred Management referred  Reduced prevalence of alcohol misuse and abuse among targeted population

50 50 Discussion

51 51 Resources  Susan Murphy  Engaging the Multigenerational Workforce htm htm


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