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© Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 Negotiating curriculum in the middle years Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch.

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Presentation on theme: "© Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 Negotiating curriculum in the middle years Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 Negotiating curriculum in the middle years Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch

2 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 A word from our students…

3 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 Note taking and note making Using the grid to document your thoughts during the session

4 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 What is this session all about? What do we mean by ‘negotiated curriculum?’ Why is it worth pursuing? What can it look like in action? What needs to be in place for negotiated curriculum to really ‘work’?

5 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 What do you think? Think Pair Share What do we notice about our interpretations?

6 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 Definitions of negotiated curriculum are many and varied…but generally share common themes “Negotiating the curriculum means classrooms in which teachers invite and allow students to help construct the learning journey” Boomer 1992: 277

7 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 Students develop their own curriculum, study methods and assessment - built around questions and issues that are important to them” James Beane

8 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 “ We are all responsible for our own learning. The teacher’s responsibility is to create educational environments that permit students to assume the responsibility that is rightfully and naturally theirs.” Brooks and Brooks 1999: 43

9 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 Related approaches/models - the constructivist view Inquiry-based learning Integrated curriculum Relational learning Project based learning

10 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 WHY? “If students are to flourish in the current personal and social context of our global conditions, then we must allow for real learning to occur. Students must be in charge of their own learning, their realities. ‘It’s not about teaching to kids. It’s about creating hearty, exciting and fascinating experiences that invite learners to work hard while exploring how to do things that challenge and intrigue them. Otero 2003:12, Caine and Caine 1997: 11)

11 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 Why? If we own our learning - we learn more effectively When we own our learning - we learn how to learn True negotiation creates a stronger, more committed community of learners A true community of learners is so much easier to ‘manage’! We can attend more effectively to individual needs and strengths

12 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 What we know about learning in the middle years… Quality teaching and learning points the way toward negotiation Problem/question driven Ownership - responsibility Team work Links with community Differentiation Authenticity Engagement Prior knowledge Relevance - to self and current issues Challenge Connectedness Higher order thinking

13 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 Skills and qualities for life long learning - what do we want? Kids who… can problem solve are creative know how to be part of a team and how to work independently understand the way they learn are resilient are effective communicators (multi modal) think reflectively and metacognitively understand self, others, physical world are systematic and organised are intelligent in a range of ways are technologically literate can think critically can research: locate, gather, critique and communicate information think ethically, caringly and empathically are flexible and adaptable Can initiate, take risks, question

14 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 “If people are given the given the skills and tools to use, and presented with a range of potentially powerful educative experiences, then given freedom, they will almost invariably choose one and get on with it. Once learners get in touch with their own sense of personal power, get out of their way and watch in awe” Edwards 2004: encouraging achievement: 3

15 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 Layers of negotiation WHAT will be learned (now, this week, this term, this year…)? How will we show what we know? HOW will we/I learn this? HOW will we/I know what we have learned? WHEN will we/I do what needs to be done? WHERE might we/I go/be to learn? WITH whom will we/I learn? FOR whom/what are we learning? HOW will we/I know what we/I have learned? WHY are we/I learning this?

16 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 so…what are some of the key ingredients for successful negotaiation? A view and expectation of the learner as capable and full of potential Respectful, dignified relationships with students- open, shared dialogue Open mindedness, empathy and trust (teachers and students) A big picture view (teachers and students) Time for sustained teaching and learning A sense of community - we are all teachers and learners High expectations Careful scaffolding, support, and clear routines/arrangements Regular, focussed reflection - ongoing monitoring (self/peer/teacher) Letting go….

17 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 “The things we steal from children”

18 © Nadine Crane and Kath Murdoch 2005 Some useful references  Beane, J. (1991). ‘The Middle School: The Natural Home of Integrated Curriculum’, Educational Leadership, 49(2),  Beane, J. (1992). Integrated Curriculum in the Middle School, ERIC Digest, 2-3, ED  Boomer, G., Lester, N., Onore, C., & Cook, J. (eds.), (1992). Negotiating the Curriculum: Educating for the 21 st Century, USA: The Falmer Press.  DEET. (2002). Middle Years Research and Development (MYRAD) Project Executive Summary, A report to the Learning and Teaching Innovation Division DEET by the Centre of Applied Educational Research Faculty of Education The University of Melbourne, February-December  Murdoch, K. (1998). Classroom Connection: Strategies for Integrated Learning, Australia: Eleanor Curtain.  Murdoch,K. and Wilson, J.(2004) Learning Links: strategic teaching for the learner centred classroom. Curric Corp.  Coloroso, B. (2002) Kids are worth it! Quill NY  Brooks, J. and Brooks,M. (1999) The case for constructivist classrooms. ASCD VA  Otero, G. et al: (2001) Relational learning : education for mind body, spirit. Hawker Brownlow Edwards, J: the Things we steal from Children: Edwards.htmlwww.eddept.wa.edu/gifttal/EAGER/Dr%20


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