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The Future of Additive Manufacturing to Improve Naval Readiness Distribution A: Approved for Public Release Anthony W. Dean, PhD Jennifer G. Michaeli,

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Presentation on theme: "The Future of Additive Manufacturing to Improve Naval Readiness Distribution A: Approved for Public Release Anthony W. Dean, PhD Jennifer G. Michaeli,"— Presentation transcript:

1 The Future of Additive Manufacturing to Improve Naval Readiness Distribution A: Approved for Public Release Anthony W. Dean, PhD Jennifer G. Michaeli, PE, PhD Sebastian Bawab, PhD Michael Ploanco Jonathan Ricci James Lambeth Carolyn Lambeth

2 “It is my strong belief that 3D printing and advanced manufacturing are breakthrough technologies for our maintenance and logistics functions in the future.” - Vice Admiral Philip Cullom, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

3 AM is the “process of joining materials to make objects from 3D model data, usually layer upon layer, as opposed to subtractive manufacturing methodologies” (ASTM International, 2012) Shapes can be created not possible through traditional manufacturing techniques allowing for the development of more efficient and robust parts. By printing parts on site, inventory and shipping costs can be reduced, and new or updated equipment can be digitally distributed, allowing for a more rapid response to the warfighters’ needs. What is Additive Manufacturing? Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

4  Material Extrusion  Vat polymerization  Material jetting  Binder jetting  Powder bed fusion  Sheet lamination  Direct energy deposition Most Common Types of Additive Manufacturing Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

5  Additive Manufacturing  3D Printing  Rapid Prototyping  Direct Digital Manufacturing Where Additive Manufacturing is being used Often referred to as: Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

6 Navy Specific Challenges Harsh operating environments  Building parts that can survive operating environments  Printing quality parts in operating environments Qualification and certification challenges  Safely and effectively utilize new materials and processes as they become available Navy specifications and standards 6  Maintaining compliance to existing standards  Reviewing and updating old standards Impact on lifecycle and acquisition for Naval platforms and components Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

7 Product evolution Strategic imperative: Balance of agility, innovation, and performance Value driver: Balance of efficiency, risk, and time Key enabling AM capabilities: – Customization to navy requirements – Increased product functionality – Market responsiveness/part availability – Zero cost of increased complexity Service model evolution Strategic imperative: Agility and innovation Value driver: Efficiency and risk Key enabling AM capabilities: – Mass customization – Manufacturing at point of use – Supply chain disintermediation – Deckplate empowerment Stasis Strategic imperative: Performance Value driver: Efficiency Key enabling AM capabilities: – Design and rapid prototyping – Production and custom tooling – Supplementary or “insurance” capability – Low rate production/no changeover Supply chain evolution Strategic imperative: Performance Value driver: Efficiency and time focus Key enabling AM capabilities: – Manufacturing closer to point of use – Responsiveness and flexibility – Management of demand uncertainty – Reduction in required inventory Low impact on chain change High impact on supply chain High impact on product Low impact on product Adapted from “3D opportunity in the Department of Defense: Additive manufacturing fires, “ Deloitte University Press Strategic Drivers:  Performance  Innovation  Agility` Value Creation:  Efficiency  Risk  Time Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

8 How can AM help the warfighter?  AM has the capability to bring parts to the warfighter more quickly and cost effectively.  By printing parts on nearby military installations or eventually shipboard, inventory can be reduced and shipping costs can be nearly eliminated for many items.  Within days or hours of identifying a needed part, a model can be designed and uploaded to a database for printing, allowing for a more rapid response to the warfighters’ needs.  AM can save time, decrease cost, and reduce inventory for the U.S. Navy. Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

9 Address Navy S&T focus area of Total Ownership Cost Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

10 Operational Availability Maintenance Repair Overhaul Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

11 Operational Availability Maintenance Repair Overhaul Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

12 Current Navy Initiatives Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

13 Print the Fleet began as a CNO’s Rapid Innovation Cell (CRIC) project dedicated to introducing AM to the Fleet Sponsor: Navy Warfare Development Command (NWDC) Technical Lead: NSWC Dahlgren (at CDSA Dam Neck) USS ESSEX Lead: Naval Postgraduate Dental School History of Print the Fleet Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

14 Provided an opportunity to educate the naval community and build prototype non-critical parts for the Fleet Accomplishments:  Conducted a series of workshops, including the Navy’s first “Maker Faire”  Built non-critical parts for Fleet at shore and shipboard  Collected user feedback to catalog warfighter needs  Worked with NAVSUP to develop a AM data repository (in process)  USS ESSEX (LHD-2): uPrint installation, building of AM parts, and training of sailors 14 Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

15 Print the Fleet Scope and Deliverables NAVSUP partnered with NWDC and CDSA Dam Neck to identify printable parts and create a suitable infrastructure to host files and bring these parts from the engineer to the warfighter. The scope of this project included developing procedures for building parts, qualifying parts, delivering parts, and training non- engineers in the use of 3D printers. Feedback from all users will be recorded to continually improve processes and procedures. Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

16 USS ESSEX (LHD 2) A uPrint (desktop 3D printer) was used to test the feasibility of printing shipboard (dry docked). This effort was led by NWDC, Naval Postgraduate Dental School, and the USS ESSEX (LHD 2). Successes:  Installation and use of a 3D printer shipboard  Training of USS Essex sailors on CAD software and using the printer Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

17 Example parts Oil Reservoir Cap Modeled by USS Essex Printed by CDSA Dam Neck Bracket for Phone Jack Boxes Modeled and printed by CDSA Dam Neck Ouija Board Pieces Modeled by USS Essex Printed by CDSA Dam Neck Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

18 Naval Engineering Education Center (NEEC) Project: Exploration of Additive Manufacturing for Naval Applications Explores the benefits and limitations of additive manufacturing in naval applications, with the following specific objectives: Gain knowledge on the Navy’s experience to date with 3D printing and their near, mid and long term goals; Expose engineering students to 3D printing technology and capture the necessary “time to train” and learning curve associated with gaining proficiency with the technology as a benchmark for the Navy’s training needs; Conduct an in-depth engineering and cost analysis of several shipboard systems to determine which components may be replaced with 3D printed parts; Design and build these parts to conduct rigorous component-based testing and simulated-system testing to examine the durability and reliability of the 3D printed parts in comparison to the traditional parts; Provide recommendations to the Navy regarding personnel training, shipboard system analysis and part identification; testing and qualification, and other lessons learned for additive manufacturing in Naval applications. Distribution A: Approved for Public Release

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20 Future Goals  CDSA Dam Neck’s location in Virginia Beach and ODU’s Norfolk location enables engineers to provide direct support to the Fleet in the Hampton Roads area.  This positions this team to work with over 20% of the Navy to develop a systematic approach to AM, and, through these efforts, pave the way for our warfighters to have 3D printing access.  Similar hubs can be set up around the world to provide support in additional locations.  In the future, it is expected that the warfighter will be able to print parts worldwide, including aboard ship while underway Southeastern Virginia is home to more than 20% of the entire United States Navy! Distribution A: Approved for Public Release


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