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Hampshire Local Flood Risk Management Strategy (LFRMS) Stakeholder Workshop 9 th July 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Hampshire Local Flood Risk Management Strategy (LFRMS) Stakeholder Workshop 9 th July 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hampshire Local Flood Risk Management Strategy (LFRMS) Stakeholder Workshop 9 th July 2012

2 Purpose of today…. Provide an introduction to the LFRMS Statutory requirement Roles and responsibilities Context Process Begin to involve you in shaping the strategy Capture your experiences of flooding Gather your comments on our assessment of current and future flood risk Brief you, so that you can brief others

3 Role of this Stakeholder Group… Bring together people affected by and responsible for flooding The invite list for today represents our current knowledge of Hampshire’s flooding community - please let us know if we’ve missed anyone out We hope this group will play an active role in shaping the LFRMS Contributing local flood knowledge Reviewing findings of our technical work Helping to identify other stakeholders Helping to raise awareness of flooding issues and responses Feeding back comments from the wider community Reviewing the proposed strategy

4 Agenda for Today Overview of the project Introductions (all) Questions Overview of our assessment of flood risk Break out session – an opportunity to look at our flood risk maps in more detail Feedback Next steps Final questions (to finish around 1.30pm)

5 Surface water flood risk <15,000 properties have a 3% chance of internal surface water flooding every year Around 30,000 residential properties have a 0.5% chance The annualised cost of damage from this flooding is estimated at around £20m Does not include cost of infrastructure flooding Does not include cost of nuisance flooding

6 700 properties affected by groundwater flooding in Hampshire in 2000/2001 Some areas being affected in 94/95, 00/01 and 02/03 Flooding can last weeks or months

7 Recorded flood incidents According to HCC records, around 370 properties have experienced surface or groundwater flooding since HCC have been recording flooding.

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17 Introduction to the LFRMS Background, process and programme

18 Background to LFRMS Flood Risk Regulations (2009) and the Flood and Water Management Act (2010) Places Lead Local Flood Authorities (LLFA) at the core of local flood risk management delivery. Hampshire County Council is a LLFA and is responsible for the production, maintenance, application and monitoring of a Local Flood Risk Management Strategy (LFRMS)

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20 Background to LFRMS The Act states that the LFRMS should explain: The roles and responsibilities of risk management authorities within the LLFA and their management functions The objectives for managing local flood risk The measures proposed to meet these objectives Importantly, an assessment of how (technically and financially), and when these measures will be implemented The environmental impact of the strategy. “develop, maintain, apply and monitor”

21 Background to LFRMS HCC already produced Preliminary Flood Risk Assessment (PFRA) LFRMS now required to assess local flood risk - ordinary watercourses, surface runoff and groundwater The LFRMS must be consistent with the Environment Agency’s National Flood Risk Management Strategy.

22 Background to LFRMS The Preliminary Flood Risk Assessment identified priority areas based on Environment Agency national significant criteria Camberley/Farnborough Basingstoke Aldershot Horndean Fleet Winchester Andover Alton 45,500 people at risk

23 Background to LFRMS Surface Water Management Plans (SWMP) are ongoing in Rushmoor Eastleigh Basingstoke Groundwater SWMP about to be commissioned Rolling prioritised programme for remaining SWMPs

24 The LFRMS process… Stage 1 – Issues and Analysis -Develop vision and objectives -Develop stakeholder engagement plan -Assess current and future flood risk Stage 2 – Scheme Identification -Develop long list of schemes and projects -Consider funding sources Stage 3 – Draft Action Plan -Quantitative cost benefit assessment of long list -Prioritised list of schemes and interventions Stage 4 – Final Action Plan -Publish and launch LFRMS

25 Structure of the LFRMS -Similar to an LDF suite of documents -The strategy/action plan will be a concise document which can be easily updated -It will cover a 15 year period – to 2028, but will be reviewed as required -Supported by various ‘evidence base’ type documents LFRMS Main document Current and future flood risk Managing Local Flood risk Partners and communication

26 Objectives… Should: -Be locally relevant -Be compatible with other strategies/policies -Fall within the remit of the LFRMS -Reflect environmental, social and economic factors We will use them to help us: -Appraise options -Prioritise investment -Gauge the success of the strategy over time Our objectives have evolved to take account of comments from our Steering Group

27 The LFRMS objectives… improve our knowledge and understanding of local flood risk in Hampshire; develop strategy, policy and a LFRMS action plans to manage these risks, providing balanced social and environmental benefits for the economic investment; work in partnership with other flood risk management authorities to deliver the strategy and action plan; maintain, and improve where necessary, local flood risk management infrastructure and systems to reduce risk; ensure that local planning authorities take full account of flood risk when allocating land and considering permitting development (by avoiding development in inappropriate locations and minimising flood risk wherever possible) Engage with community groups to increase public awareness of, and reporting of, flooding and promote appropriate individual and community level planning and action; improve and support community level flood response and recovery; Identify national, regional and local funding mechanisms to deliver flood risk management interventions.

28 The LFRMS will… Set out roles and responsibilities for flooding Present an assessment of flood risk and identify ‘hot spots’ Take account of flood issues from main rivers, coastal erosion etc (although largely out of scope) Consider climate change implications Signpost to, and cross reference, other relevant strategies Provide detail to help inform planning policies on where development can go Set out actions (interventions, management, policies) to reduce risk Identify costs and benefits of strategic schemes (both financial and non- financial) Provide advice on funding mechanisms and develop a funding strategy Undertake Strategic Environmental Assessment of strategy Strategy is for 15 year period to 2028, reviewed in 2018, and review following any significant flood event

29 Opportunities to influence the strategy… As part of the requirements under the Act, Risk Management Authorities and members of the public must be consulted Over and above this basic requirement, consultation is included as a central part of our overall approach because we hope it will -Ensure our analysis of flood risk matches local experience -Pave the way for a smooth working relationship with our partners -Generate greater buy in for the proposals -Help promote understanding about the issues

30 Consultation on the LFRMS Context, methodology, role of this group

31 Why consult? As part of the requirements under the Act, Risk Management Authorities and members of the public must be consulted Over and above this basic requirement, consultation is included as a central part of our overall approach because we hope it will -Ensure our analysis of flood risk matches local experience -Pave the way for a smooth working relationship with our partners -Generate greater buy in for the proposals -Help promote understanding about the issues

32 Who we will consult… Tier 1 PartnersWork with Bodies with direct responsibility for flood risk management Tier 1aMembersKeep informed/ involve District and County Council Members Scrutiny Committee Members Tier 2Stakeholders Involve Representatives of groups who may be affected by flooding Tier 3PublicConsultThe public

33 How we will consult… Tier 1 Partners Tier 1a Members Tier 2 Stakeholders Tier 3 Public Steering Group Briefings Workshop Online consultation

34 When we will consult… Tier 1 Partners Tier 1a Members Tier 3 Public Stage 1 Issues and Analysis April 2012 Stage 4 Final Strategy Nov 2012 Tier 2 Stakeholders Stage 2 Scheme Identification Stage 3 Draft Strategy

35 How we will consult… Tier 1 Partners Tier 1a Members Tier 2 Stakeholders Tier 3 Public Steering Group Ongoing Briefings Ongoing Workshop July 2012 Online consultation Autumn 2012

36 30 Second introductions

37 The Assessment of Current and Future Flood Risk An overview

38 Assessment of current and future flood risk -Combine national scale data from EA, with regional scale data from other providers -Build on PFRA assessment -Sit alongside SWMP -Single consistent assessment of local flood risk -Feed into future SWMP programme -Balanced assessment of consequence and probability

39 Available data Current flood risk Incident data HCC incident data (drainage tool v4.xls) & supporting GIS layers Water company flood incident data (DG5 register) Thames Water Southern Water Wessex Water Groundwater flooding incident data from 2001 report and EA Defra report on groundwater flooding Model or simulated data EA flood maps EA surface water maps (AStSWF, FMfSW)

40 Methodology Analyse flood incident data Frequency Consequence Confidence Analyse flood map data Frequency Consequence Confidence Combine incident and map data Combine risk score Map hotpot areas and flood metrics

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47 These results just for Residential property flooding from EA FmFSW 1 in 200yr Also completed for residential property FmFSW 1 in 30, HCC incident data Ongoing for non residential property and infrastructure Qualifying for funding from the EA (Flood Defence Grant in Aid) driven by residential properties at risk of significant surface flooding and deprivation index. Economic cost of flooding for non-residential property will be used to supplement applications for FDGiA and seek funding from other sources.

48 Break out session Looking at the maps in more detail

49 Break out session Facilitators will talk you through the assessment process in more detail Take some time to study the maps in more detail Help us verify the assessment by commenting on: -Does the mapping reflect your experience? -Are we showing a risk where you have no knowledge of flooding? -Are we missing any areas which regularly flood?

50 Next Steps

51 Next steps Completion and consultation on ‘current and future flood risk’ Gathering info on funding sources Gathering info on planned/committed schemes Defining potential policy approaches Drawing up a ‘long list’ of potential schemes Strategic Environmental Assessment Short listing of schemes Identifying a costed programme of works to address flood issues Writing the draft LFRMS

52 Online consultation Some of the information you have viewed today will be made available online for wider comment Please encourage others to visit the website and leave their comments www3.hants.gov.uk/flooding Or contact

53 Consultation on draft strategy… The draft LFRMS will be available for public consultation in the autumn The document will be available: -On the website -In public buildings There will be an online questionnaire We will be holding a drop in session for people to find out more and ask questions Please take the time to comment and encourage others to also get involved Following the consultation the strategy will be updated and finalised in November

54 Feedback Please take a moment to fill out a feedback form to let us know how you think this session has been We will use your feedback to help plan future consultations

55 Contact details Any further comments or questions please contact Pete Errington Andy McConkey


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