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Working for the future of Amateur Radio visionvaluesteamwork Radio Society of Great Britain In 1922 the name of the Society was changed to: Radio Society.

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Presentation on theme: "Working for the future of Amateur Radio visionvaluesteamwork Radio Society of Great Britain In 1922 the name of the Society was changed to: Radio Society."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Working for the future of Amateur Radio visionvaluesteamwork Radio Society of Great Britain In 1922 the name of the Society was changed to: Radio Society of Great Britain Radio Society of Great Britain 1922 Committee

3 Working for the future of Amateur Radio Dec 1923 licence proposals Key conditions:  Prohibition of spark transmissions on all “wavelengths”  440m available between 5 pm and 11 pm on weekdays and during broadcasting hours on Sundays  New band between 200 and 203m available between 6pm and midnight, except when military manoeuvres were taking place  Wavelengths between 20 and 40m be used for genuine research work  Use of CW on 1,600m would only be granted in exceptional conditions  Transmissions only authorised for inter-UK contacts, except by special permission and then only with Western Europe!

4 Working for the future of Amateur Radio Changes to the licences in 1928 Key changes: Raw a.c. and i.c.w. were prohibited Authorisation to use 1715 – 2000kc/s, 7000 – 7300kc/s and – 14400kc/s “bands” Transoceanic permits (a relaxation following the 1923 licence) were to continue in force, and that those holding them could additionally use 28 – 30Mc/s and 56 – 60Mc/s 3500 – 4000kc/s reserved exclusively for experiments following additional authorisation on the recommendation of the RSGB.

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6 Working for the future of Amateur Radio QSL cards ►Many QSL cards and photos were exchanged in the 1920s between US and British stations ►US stations prefixed their call with the letter U or A to avoid confusion

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8 Working for the future of Amateur Radio visionvaluesteamwork 2nd Series of Tests ►A second series of tests took place in December Well known American amateur Paul Godley 2ZE travelled to Europe to take part. ►Whilst in London Godley met with Marconi, Campbell- Swinton, Sir Henry Jackson and other distinguished members of the RSGB ►The first complete message he received was transmitted by 1BCG.

9 Léon Deloy, 8AB First two-way transatlantic QSO by a Radio Amateur

10 Working for the future of Amateur Radio December 1923 ►16th December 1923 first contact between Canadian A W Greig 1BQ and Ernest J Simmonds 2OD took place on 116 metres using just 30 watts ►Ernest went on to make two-way contacts with Mexico, Argentina and Australia

11 Working for the future of Amateur Radio visionvaluesteamwork ►The first British amateur to make two way contact was Jack Partridge 2KF on 8th December He contacted A1MO operated by Ken Warner First British amateur to make two-way contacts

12 ►Early 1924, Hiram P Maxim, 1AW President of the Amateur Relay League visited Europe with the aim to: “encourage international amateur radio relations” ►On 14 th April 1925 a congress with 23 countries attending was held in Paris at which the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) was formed ►Hiram Maxim, 1AW as its first International President, Gerald Marcuse, 2NM was Vice President International Amateur Radio Union (IARU)


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