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A sentence The sentence book Sue Palmer. A sentence starts with a capital letter ends with a full stop makes complete sense. * * *

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Presentation on theme: "A sentence The sentence book Sue Palmer. A sentence starts with a capital letter ends with a full stop makes complete sense. * * *"— Presentation transcript:

1 A sentence The sentence book Sue Palmer

2 A sentence starts with a capital letter ends with a full stop makes complete sense. * * *

3 Midnight It was midnight. Dad and I were walking home from my sister’s wedding party. I’d never been out that late before. The streets were deserted and our footsteps echoed in the darkness. Suddenly there was an unearthly sound! It pierced the silent like an ice-cold wind. What was it? A scream? A howl? Ghosts? I stood rooted to the spot, shivers trickling down my spine. Dad stopped too. “It’s coming from the Brown’s house.” he said. “I promised I’d keep an eye on it for them while they’re on holiday.” Before I knew it, Dad was running down the Browns’ front drive. “Stay there!” he yelled to me. “No fear!” I replied. I had to follow, because I was too scared to stay behind.

4 Sentences can be statements It was midnight. I’d never been out that late before. questions ? exclamations ! What was it? Was I dreaming? What a terrible sound! No fear! Story start example (1)Ways to vary sentences Sentences can also be commands. Click to know more.

5 Sentences can be short… * to attract attention * for dramatic impact * to move events on quickly It was midnight. Stop! What was it? * to build up tension * for descriptive power * to give lots of information. …or long As the clock struck midnight one bleak November night, a spine-chilling howl rang out, slowly and sadly, through the empty streets. Story start example (2)

6 Sentences can give background detail about what happened. what happened? a howl rang out how? where?when? slowly and sadlythrough the empty streetsat midnight You can move these, and how wherewhen You can also add descriptive words and phrases. spine-chillinglike an ice-cold wind See Word Class Book chunks around to get different effects. Story start example (3)Ways to vary sentences

7 What is it? I don’t know. But I’m going to find out. Stay here! No fear! I’m coming too! Sentences can be part of direct speech. “What is it?” I asked. “I don’t know,” Dad replied. “But I’m going to find out. Stay here!” “No fear!” I gasped. I’m coming too!” direct speech reporting clause Story start example (4)Ways to vary sentences

8 Story start example (5) Sentences can say what someone did… …or they can just tell what happened. A dog howled. The thief left the door open. He had broken the window. We could see nothing. A howl rang out. The door was open. The window had been broken. There was nothing to be seen. There are lots of ways to say the same thing - for instance, you don’t have to say whodunnit! Ways to vary sentences

9 You can link simple sentences together with words like and and but. Coordination The streets were deserted. Our footsteps echoed in the darkness. We peered through the shadows. We could see nothing. Dad yelled at me to stay put. He rushed off down the path. The streets were deserted and our footsteps echoed in the darkness. We peered through the shadows but could see nothing. Dad yelled at me to stay put and rushed off down the path. These are called compound sentences. See also ‘The Complex Sentence Book’. Ways to vary sentences

10 You can link simple sentences together with words like when, as and because. Subordination The clock struck midnight. A howl rang out. Dad reached the house. He stopped and listened. I followed. I was too scared to stay behind. As the clock struck midnight, a howl rang out. When Dad reached the house, he stopped and listened. I followed because I was too scared to stay behind. These are called complex sentences. See also ‘The Complex Sentence Book’. Ways to vary sentences

11 Ways to vary sentences Use different sentence types –. ? ! Use direct speech to carry the story. Turn what someone did into what happened. Use different sentence lengths. Vary the position of how when where chunks. Use linking words to make longer sentences. To make good sentences choose the best words.

12 To make good sentences, choose the best words, e.g. * powerful verbs * interesting adjectives and adverbs * precise nouns * the best conjunctions to link your ideas. (see The Word Class Book)

13 You can finish this story. First, plan it - for instance: IntroEnding Dad and I howl! midnightwalking home! Scary! Brown’s house – shed go in Scary! dog has had pups – howling for help take to vets time passes child gets black pup Name: Midnight! Then write your story, using good sentences.

14 End Show The End Skeleton Poster Books for GRAMMAR

15 Midnight It was midnight. Dad and I were walking home from my sister’s wedding party. I’d never been out that late before. The streets were deserted and our footsteps echoed in the darkness. Suddenly there was an unearthly sound! It pierced the silent like an ice-cold wind. What was it? A scream? A howl? Ghosts? I stood rooted to the spot, shivers trickling down my spine. Dad stopped too. “It’s coming from the Brown’s house.” he said. “I promised I’d keep an eye on it for them while they’re on holiday.” Before I knew it, Dad was running down the Browns’ front drive. “Stay there!” he yelled to me. “No fear!” I replied. I had to follow, because I was too scared to stay behind

16 Next slide Sentences can be statements It was midnight. I’d never been out that late before. questions ? exclamations ! What was it? Was I dreaming? What a terrible sound! No fear! Story start example (1)Ways to vary sentences commands Stay there! Please wait here.


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