Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

City of Washington Hurricane Isabel Response September 2003.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "City of Washington Hurricane Isabel Response September 2003."— Presentation transcript:

1 City of Washington Hurricane Isabel Response September 2003

2 Advance Preparations Prior to 8 a.m. Thursday, September 18

3 Advance Preparations (Prior to 8 a.m. on 9/18) Management team, departments discuss: – Staffing (City & contracted resources) – Meals & lodging – Operations Support (supplies, call center) – Alternative facilities (Police, Fire) – Facilities, parks & equipment preparation – Public infrastructure preparation (ditches clear, water tanks full) – Preparations for FEMA reimbursement – Public information

4 Advance Preparations (Prior to 8 a.m. on 9/18) Coordinate with other agencies – Beaufort County Emergency Operations Center – ElectriCities – Large electric customers

5 Operations During the Storm Starting 8 a.m. Thursday September 18

6 Operations During the Storm (Starting at 8 a.m. 9/18) Maintain services (outage repair, public safety, operations) in field until winds reach 50 mph to protect employees, equipment For public safety, de-energize electric circuits near waterfront Resume services in the field when winds drop to below 50 mph – Jack’s Creek Pumping Station monitored to protect equipment in case of power outage

7 Operations During the Storm (Starting at 8 a.m. 9/18) Debris cleared from streets to maintain emergency vehicle access Wells, wastewater lift stations use generators for back-up power Information distributed to public

8 Operations After the Storm After midnight Friday September 19

9 Operations After the Storm (After midnight 9/19) Normal staffing, operations resume when need for emergency response passes Heavy call volume continues at Utilities Operations Center Storm Debris clean-up begins (daylight hours) – City parks – Residential pick-up

10 Operations After the Storm (After midnight 9/19) Equipment, facilities repairs begin Wastewater treatment adjusted to handle higher inflow due to stormwater Information distributed to the public FEMA reimbursement preparations

11 Lessons Learned Post Incident Assessment: What Went Well

12 Lessons Learned What Worked Well Suspending/limiting outdoor activities when sustained winds reached 50 mph – Maintains safety of personnel and equipment Coordinating City and county operations through use of the County Emergency Operations Center Assigning City staff or officials to County Emergency Operations Center

13 Lessons Learned What Worked Well Bringing in contracted electric line crews prior to storm to be on site as soon as needed Aggressive tree-trimming program for preventive maintenance Completed Hazard Mitigation Projects (elevation, acquisitions) reduced chance of flooded structures Scheduling warehouse staff worked in shifts

14 Lessons Learned What Worked Well Public acknowledged the fact they received their power back in a timely manner Public expressed appreciation for “live voice” at the Utilities Customer Call Center Field personnel knew what to expect with meal preparations and schedule

15 Lessons Learned Post Incident Assessment: What We Need To Work On

16 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Limiting outdoor operations Consider citywide policy on limiting outdoor operations when sustained winds reach 50 mph Identify consistent means to determine wind speed – Sources: wastewater plant, water plant, airport, news media Evaluate effectiveness, accuracy of telemetry now in use

17 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Staffing & Staff Support Assign personnel from other departments to assist Fire-Rescue-EMS in meal preparations, cooking Expand amount of time utilities call center is staffed (during storm as well as longer during response period) Address short-term storage of large quantities of perishable food at Fire Station Make advance arrangements for distributing leftover food Address staff rest and relief, stress management

18 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Operations Logistics, Support & Issues In General Recognize that differences in each storm may require different means of preparation, response Assign separate radio frequencies for Public Works and Electric operations

19 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Operations Logistics, Support & Issues Public Safety Consolidate dispatching for Police and Fire- Rescue-EMS Fire-Rescue-EMS had to develop two emergency plans for remaining at or vacating fire station Develop policy/procedure on responding to transformer or power line fires

20 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Operations Logistics, Support & Issues Electric Evaluate de-energizing waterfront electric grid remotely Use of contracted crews limited by availability of staff to guide crews around system, service area Assess equipment needs for Electric Line Crews, such as mounted spotlights to aid in visual inspections at night

21 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Operations Logistics, Support & Issues Public Works Consider options for electric generator at Jack’s Creek to maintain pumping ability at all times (new culverts will not help until river level drops) Purchasing & Supply Evaluate need for policy on issuing City supplies, such as rain suits and flashlights, to contracted workers

22 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Response management and oversight Pursue installation of an electric generator at Municipal Building to retain municipal operations Extend length (starting and stopping) of State of Emergency Establish system to deter price gouging, unscrupulous outside contractors

23 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Traffic control Barricade Main Street at Bridge Street and other flood-prone areas (Park Drive area) to deter sightseers, vehicle traffic Develop methods to keep public at safe distance from Electric Line Crews’ work areas

24 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Traffic control For safety reasons (i.e.: floating vehicles), consider having a tow truck on standby to tow vehicles from flood-prone areas Heavy vehicle traffic interfered with relocation of generators to wastewater lift stations during the eye of the storm

25 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Information gathering & sharing Develop means for assessing power outage status, such as an electronic map that could show when a circuit is out Provide information to assist Customer Call Center staff in fielding caller inquiries – Script with responses to frequently asked questions – Status reports on area outages, updated regularly Evaluate use of GIS system in storm status and response

26 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Information gathering & sharing Evaluate use of existing utility customer records in supporting electric emergency response efforts (locating customers, poles, transformers, etc.) Assess internal communications needs between departments Investigate use of text pagers as a communications tool Improve information flow of relevant information from City to County EOC (power outage status, street status)

27 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Public Education and Information Conduct storm preparedness public education campaign at start of hurricane season Educate customers with medical concerns about making advance provisions for power outages during storms Retain ability to access internet, and Government Access Channel for communications and information during storm (i.e.: wireless connection; fiber optic connection of City facilities)

28 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Staff training Implement annual training for hurricane preparation and response Train staff to assist Communications Services during storm period Train customer call center staff in advance on procedures, information needed for the dispatcher, electric operations, handling abusive callers, etc. Provide training in proper use of communications radio

29 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Utilities Operations Center Command & Dispatch Center Assign a Communications/Operations Manager to track and direct activities and resources in the field Update information on customers with medical needs Update electric system maps Assign supervisor for call center staff

30 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Utilities Customer Call Center Establish procedure for sharing information at shift changes Fine-tune staffing (length of shifts, scheduling relief personnel, when to open and close call center) Manage noise in call center environment

31 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Continuing Needs Water Resources All 30 wastewater lift stations are required by state law to be equipped with electric generators at a cost of approximately $20,000 each By end of , City will have approximately ½ of lift station generators in place

32 Lessons Learned Issues, Concerns, Things To Work On Continuing Needs Water Resources Research availability of pump motors with larger hoods to prevent future damage during hurricane due to water entering the housing (2 motors ruined during Isabel) Public Safety New and/or improved facilities

33 Outcome/Statistics 8,000 of 12,000 electric customers were without power at some point during storm 95% restored by Saturday evening Washington spared projected 10-foot tidal surge. Actual surge was 6 ½ - 7 feet above sea level, and only a couple of streets were flooded. Streets clear of flood water by 4 a.m. 9/19

34 Outcome/Statistics Storm debris cleanup completed Oct. 3; estimated 7,000-8,000 cubic yards collected No reports from public of flooded residences Generator loaned to neighboring city once Washington’s power restored FEMA has declared eligibility for reimbursement for storm expenses

35 City of Washington Hurricane Isabel Response September 2003


Download ppt "City of Washington Hurricane Isabel Response September 2003."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google