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II. Histories of Sound 3. Acoustic Archives. 1.Sound recording as archival medium (Sterne) 2.Women and telephony: Two Archives (Martin, Martel) 3.Sonification.

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Presentation on theme: "II. Histories of Sound 3. Acoustic Archives. 1.Sound recording as archival medium (Sterne) 2.Women and telephony: Two Archives (Martin, Martel) 3.Sonification."— Presentation transcript:

1 II. Histories of Sound 3. Acoustic Archives

2 1.Sound recording as archival medium (Sterne) 2.Women and telephony: Two Archives (Martin, Martel) 3.Sonification (Sterne and Akiyama)

3 Is it a Live Recording, or is it Voices of the Dead? A Comparative Case Study:

4 Sound of Music in Era of Electronic Reproduction (Mowitt)

5 Mowitt argues that contemporary listening conditions are characterized by repetition, reproducibility, and recognition The social construction of listening Listening = interpretation “Is it live, or is it Memorex?” Memory and Electronic (sound) Reproduction:

6 Modernist ocularcentrism? (Thinking through Adorno, Benjamin, and Attali) Reik’s notion of the third ear (p. 223)

7 Francis Barraud’s painting of Nipper, dog of his deceased brother Mark Henry, painted around Barraud titled it Dog looking at and listening to a Phonograph

8 Barraud copying his painting for William Barry Owens (Emile Berliner’s manager) who bought the rights to it in 1899.

9 Burraud’s revised painting His Master’s Voice

10 The His Master’s Voice trademark was granted to Emile Berliner in 1900

11 Nipper became known as the “RCA dog”

12 Preserving Sound in Modern America (Sterne)

13 Preserving the voices of the dead Ephemerality of the records A figure of exteriority Victorian culture and death Bourgeois modernity “The ethos of preservation described and prescribed the cultural and technical possibilities of sound recording.” (p. 298) Sound recording as an archival medium :

14 Canning technology (1850s-1880s) Embalming His Master’s Voice (1899) Phonographical messages to the future Audio ethnography A Resonant tomb:

15 Frances Densmore recording Blackfoot chief Mountain Chief on a cylinder phonograph for the Bureau of American Ethology in 1916

16 Is the acoustic archive the third ear or a resonant tomb? Some questions to think about, comparatively, between Mowitt and Sterne’s discussions on sound reproduction:

17 Is the acoustic archive the third ear or a resonant tomb? What roles does listening play in remembering the past, and how does sound reproduction technologies enable, modify, and/or pre-determine how we remember? Some questions to think about, comparatively, between Mowitt and Sterne’s discussions on sound reproduction:

18 Does preservation and collective interdependence have anything to do with each other? Some questions to think about, comparatively, between Mowitt and Sterne’s discussions on sound reproduction:

19 WOMEN AND TELEPHONY: TWO ARCHIVES

20 1. Gender and Early Telephone Culture (Martin)

21 2. Phantom of The Operator (Canada, 2004) Dir. Caroline Martel

22 THINKING ABOUT SONIFICATION: SCOTT’S PHONAUTOGRAM

23 Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville’s Phonautograph, 1857

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26 A phonautogram scanned from one of Scott’s originals in the archive of the Institut de France and published by First Sounds

27 What does it mean to play back sound recordings that were never meant for playback?

28 What implications does the practice of sonification have on sound studies as a field?

29 For Thursday: Look for an acoustic archive, think about it in relation to Sterne’s discussions, and what it can offer an aural historian based on the examples of Martin and Martell. Create a blog post and be prepared to discuss in class.


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