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Listening Processes Listen and take notes. Then compare your notes with my notes. How are you doing with your listening skills?

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Presentation on theme: "Listening Processes Listen and take notes. Then compare your notes with my notes. How are you doing with your listening skills?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Listening Processes Listen and take notes. Then compare your notes with my notes. How are you doing with your listening skills?

2 Listening Improvement of student listening skills: Combination of extensive and intensive listening material and procedures. Opportunity to hear voices other than the teacher’s enables students to acquire good speaking habits as a result of the spoken English they absorb, and helps to improve their pronunciation

3 Listening Extensive listening can have a dramatic effect to a student’s language learning Extensive listening: Outside the classroom At home Car On personal stereos as they travel from one place to another Motivation increases when students make their own choices about what they are going to listen to

4 Listening Extensive listening sources Simplified readers with audio Own copies of course audio DVDs / iPod / tapes Audio DVDs / iPod / tapes of authentic material On personal stereos as they travel from one place to another Motivation increases when students make their own choices about what they are going to listen to

5 Listening Extensive listening sources For Extensive listening to work effectively Collection of appropriate material clearly marked for level, topic and genre. Kept like simplified readers in a permanent location Keep a record of which students have borrowed which tapes; Involve students in the tasks of record-keeping

6 Listening Encourage extensive listening: have students perform a number of tasks Record their responses to what they have heard in a personal journal Fill in prepared report forms: list the topic, assess the level of difficulty, and summarise the contents of the tape Comments box Listening poster Website comments Share their information with colleagues

7 Listening Intensive listening: using taped material / material on audio CD/DVD Advantages: Allow students to hear a variety of different voices apart from just their own teacher’s Range of different characters, especially when real people are talking. Variety of situations Audio material: portable and readily available, cheap, relatively inexpensive

8 Listening Intensive listening: using taped material / material on audio CD/DVD Disadvantages: In big classrooms, poor acoustics Everyone has to listen at the same speed, a speed dictated by the tape, not by the listeners Not natural

9 Listening Intensive listening: using taped material / material on audio CD/DVD Potential problems: Check audio source and machine quality before using them in class Position of the playback machine – sound quality have a number of machines for students to listen at their own speed or language lab

10 Listening How often to play the audio segment for students to listen? In real life, it is not ‘replayed’ In face-to-face conversation – chance to ask for clarification and repetition Maximum benefit Replay two or more times

11 Listening Listening tasks First Listening Prediction task Gist tasks Return for Detailed comprehension Text interpretation Language analysis

12 Listening ‘Live’ Listening Teacher reading aloud Story telling Interviews Conversations Visitors / guest speakers

13 Listening Intensive Listening – the role of the teacher Organiser – tell students exactly what their listening purpose is, give them clear instructions Machine operator: try material before taking it into class; playback; stop and start the machine according to students’ needs Feedback organiser: compare their answers in pairs and then ask for answers from the class in general or from pairs in particular; be supportive Prompter: have students listen again to notice a variety of language and spoken features; offer script dictations

14 Listening Listening lesson sequences Listening can occur at a number of points in a teaching sequence Jumping of point for activities which follow First stage of a ‘listening and acting out’ sequence where students role-play the situation they have heard on the tape Live listening may be a prelude to a piece of writing which is the main focus of a lesson Listening training is the central focus of a lesson Be flexible

15 Listening Listening lesson sequences Most listening sequences involve a mixture of language skills, though one, in particular, is often the main focus of the sequence For gist on first hearing before moving on to different task skills; Listen for specific information straight away

16 Listening Examples The sound of music – powerful, speaks to our emotions Play a film music and get students to say what kind of film they think it comes from Write stories based on the mood of the music they hear Activity: Ironic

17 Listening Examples The sound of music – powerful, speaks to our emotions Song lyrics: Have students bring their own favourite songs to class Use older songs Use songs you like Songs appropriate in terms of topic and subject matter

18 Listening Activity Examples Interviewing a stranger: page 233 Sorry I’m late: page 233 Telephone messages: page 235 UFO: page 237 We had a nice time, but… : page 238 At the post office: page 241 Ironic: page 242

19 Listening using the Internet English Listening Skills and Activities-Effective Listening Practice Randall’s ESL Cyber Listening Lab Listening Skill Practice English Listening Room English Language Listening Lab Online ESL: Listening ESL Independent Study Lab - Listening 1 Listening Quizzes English Pronunciation / Listening


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