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SIX THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT THE UC OPEN ACCESS POLICY Christopher Kelty, Associate Professor Institute for Society and Genetics, Dept. of Anthropology, Dept.

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Presentation on theme: "SIX THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT THE UC OPEN ACCESS POLICY Christopher Kelty, Associate Professor Institute for Society and Genetics, Dept. of Anthropology, Dept."— Presentation transcript:

1 SIX THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT THE UC OPEN ACCESS POLICY Christopher Kelty, Associate Professor Institute for Society and Genetics, Dept. of Anthropology, Dept. of Information Studies Immediate Past Chair, University Committee on Library and Scholarly Communication (UCOLASC)

2 0. IT’S NEW. Passed the Academic Senate on July24 th, Two years of review and revision. Largest University to pass such a policy (175+ others). Continuing review and revision over the next year.

3 WHAT IS OPEN ACCESS? In 2002, the Budapest Open Access Initiative defined open access as: ”the world-wide electronic distribution of the peer-reviewed journal literature, completely free and unrestricted access to it by all scientists, scholars, teachers, students, and other curious minds."

4 WHO BENEFITS FROM OPEN ACCESS? Scholars in universities increase visibility, usage, and impact of research Retain rights to use and reuse research publications, including derivatives Industry, business, arts and scholarship beyond the university Gain access to cutting edge research and new ideas Fuels innovation, discovery, creativity and progress Stimulates and guides public discourse and debate The people of California (and the world) Get a return on their investment and taxes when research is freely available Promotes knowledge and free expression as a public good Libraries, K-12, educators generally Gain access to the latest research Creates a basis for better learning and teaching everywhere Publishers Reduced transactions costs in managing complex subscriptions Doing the right thing with scholarly research

5 WHO HAS ACCESS NOW? Scholars in (rich) universities increase visibility, usage, and impact of research Retain rights to use and reuse research publications, including derivatives Industry, business, arts and scholarship beyond the university Gain access to cutting edge research and new ideas Fuels innovation, discovery, creativity and progress Stimulates and guides public discourse and debate The people of California (and the world) Get a return on their investment and taxes when research is freely available Promotes knowledge and free expression as a public good Libraries, K-12, educators generally Gain access to the latest research Creates a basis for better learning and teaching everywhere Publishers Reduced transactions costs in managing complex subscriptions Doing the right thing with scholarly research

6 1. MADE BY FACULTY, FOR FACULTY. Designed to promote open access, but respect academic freedom. Open access = more readers, more citations, more engagement. OA policies work by changing the default. From weak individual negotiation to strong collective power. Strength and weakness of the policy = opt out/waiver.

7 2. IT’S GREEN NOT GOLD. Green policies reserve rights (under copyright law) to make a version of any publication available in a public repository. Gold OA means new business models that make open access publishing more sustainable (hopefully). UC OA policy does not require that anyone pay to publish or publish in an OA journal. Advantage? Reserves strong, flexible rights without committing to any particular business model.

8 3. IT STARTS NOV. 1 ST UCLA and UCI will be the ‘pilot’ universities (but anyone at any UC can officially start depositing). UCSF has already started. In , the California Digital Library will provide: - a streamlined deposit system (Nov. 1) - a prototype ‘harvesting’ tool (Summer 2014) - stats and data about the process (throughout)

9 4. THERE ARE LOTS OF WAYS TO DO IT. eScholarship is the official system-wide repository of the UC system indexed by Google, CrossRef and other databases can house supplementary materials, data, etc. Any other recognized OA repository will satisfy the policy PubMed, ArXiv, other University repositories, etc. Consistent with the NIH Public Access policy If you choose to publish in an OA journal, that also satisfies the policy PLoS journals, BioMed journals, Open Humanities Press, Cultural Anthropology, Duke Law Review, Nucleic Acids Research, Bryn Mawr Classical Review, etc. “Hybrid” gold OA not necessary. Choose full OA journals instead.

10 5. YOU CONTROL YOUR PUBLICATIONS. You can deposit your article anytime after it is accepted for publication (‘by the date of publication’). You can determine whether to make it available immediately or after an embargo period (6 months, 12 months etc) You can determine the license rights that apply Commercial or Non-commercial uses? Derivative works? “Share Alike” (license applies to all subsequent users) You can decide which version to upload (up to a point...) Some publishers allow final typeset versions, some do not (see

11 6. THERE ARE LOTS OF PEOPLE WHO WANT TO HELP. Main Open Access Portal via CDL CDL Implementation Project https://wiki.library.ucsf.edu/display/OAPI UCLA Library

12 FEEDBACK The Senate, UCOP and CDL need feedback on both advantages and problems. Is it great for you? Does it suck? Can you help make it better somehow?


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