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Figurative Language… the Language of Poetry In figurative language, words are used to express more than their dictionary meaning. It conveys vivid images.

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Presentation on theme: "Figurative Language… the Language of Poetry In figurative language, words are used to express more than their dictionary meaning. It conveys vivid images."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Figurative Language… the Language of Poetry In figurative language, words are used to express more than their dictionary meaning. It conveys vivid images. (Verse that uses sounds, rhythm, and word choice to convey ideas.)

3 Examples: I quarreled with my brother, a I don’t know what about, b One thing led to another a And somehow we fell out. b - Eleanor Farjeon, from “The Quarrel” Rhyme Scheme: the pattern of rhymes in a poem (done by alternating letters of the alphabet for each rhyming sound)

4 SIMILE : a comparison of two unlike things using like, as, resembles, than Examples: as sweet as sugar bright like the moon tall as a mountain her heart resembles a prison

5 Metaphor : a comparison of two unlike things Unlike similes, metaphors do NOT contain words such as like, as, etc. Examples: He was a bear to us! The ribbon of road wound away. His smile is sunshine in our day. Her words rained down on us.

6 ONOMATOPOEIA : words that sound like what they mean Examples: Buzz! Crunch! Bang! Crack!

7 Personification : giving human qualities to an animal, object, or idea Examples: The wind whispered to us. Our blue sky smiled down upon us. His eyes spoke what his mouth could not. The willow tree grasped at them with its branches.

8 ALLITERATION : the repetition of initial consonant sound for effect Examples: The day of his death was a dark, cold day Seven swans swam silently seaward. Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers. Rosemary ran as rapidly as required.

9 SYMBOL : an object that stands for something larger than itself, usually an abstract concept Examples: dove – a bird / a symbol of peace apple – a fruit / a symbol of temptation black – a color / a symbol of evil flag – a cloth / a symbol of patriotism

10 IDIOM: an expression that has meaning different from the meaning of its individual words Examples raining cats and dogs kill two birds with one stone laughing stock don’t be a wet blanket

11 HYPERBOLE : simple exaggeration – in the service of truth, not with the intention of lying Examples: I’ll die if I don’t pass this test! You could knock me over with a feather with that comment! I’ve read that a million times and I still don’t get it. He walked forever to find his way home.

12 IRONY: a contrast between what is expected and and what actually exists or happens Examples: Helen Keller was always keenly aware of what was going on around her. Alanis Morissette lyrics: Rain on your wedding day A free ride when you’ve already paid He waited his whole life to take that flight, and as the plane crashed down, he thought, well isn’t this nice. An old man, turned 98, won the lottery, and died the next day Meeting the man of your dreams, and then meeting his beautiful wife. A traffic jam when you’re already late A death-row pardon two minutes too late Ten thousand spoons when all you need is a knife

13 IMAGERY Words that appeal to the reader’s senses (sight, smell, taste, hear, touch) Example: The salty air, the melting sun, the icy waves, and the sweet tartness of the popsicle made my heart soar with the hope that this day would never end!

14 “The Ode” The ode was invented in ancient Greece in 500 B.C. by the poet Pindar. They were serious, dignified songs that were performed to celebrate great heroes in battle. In the 20th century, poet Pablo Neruda refined the ode. He discarded the rules about odes and wrote them about everyday life and objects: a pair of socks, onions, a spoon, French fries, etc. We will now share his poem, “Ode to the Apple”.

15 A few of the more popular POETIC FORMS… Haiku – Japanese 17-syllable poem that usually describes nature in some form Concrete – Poem is molded into the physical form of its subject Acrostic – Each letter that begins each line of this poem creates a word (usually done with names)

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