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The Discourse Analysis of an Extract from Jane Eyre By Group 7

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1 The Discourse Analysis of an Extract from Jane Eyre By Group 7

2 DA based on 5C’s Context Cohesion Coherence Culture Critique
Discourse Activity

3 Context Context of situation SPEAKING setting : 1847
participants: Jane Eyre & fortune-teller(Mr. Rochester) ends: to test whether Jane Eyre loves him or not keys: serious instrumentalities: spoken channel norms: asking questions genre: conversation

4 Jane Eyre (1847) has enjoyed huge popularity since first publication, and its success owes much to its exceptional emotional power. Jane Eyre, a penniless orphan, is engaged as governess at Thornfield Hall by the mysterious Mr. Rochester. Her integrity and independence are tested to the limit as their love for each other grows, and the secrets of Mr. Rochester's past are revealed. This extract is mainly about the conversation between Jane Eyre and the fortune-teller. In fact, Mr. Rochester disguises himself as the fortune-teller to test whether Jane Eyre loves him or not.

5 Cohesion Grammatical cohesion: Reference Ellipsis Substitution
Lexical cohesion: Repetitions

6 Reference “ Well, and you want your fortune told?” she said, in a voice as decided as her glance, as harsh as her features. I don’t care about it, mother; you may please yourself: but I ought to warn you, I have no faith.” “It’s like your impudence to say so: I expected it of you; I heard it in your step as you crossed the threshold.” “Did you? You’ve a quick ear.” “I have; and a quick eye and a quick brain.” “You need them all in your trade.” “I do; especially when I’ve customers like you to deal with. Why don't you tremble?” “I'm not cold.” “Why don’t you turn pale?” “I am not sick.” “Why don’t you consult my art?” “I’m not silly.”

7 Ellipsis and substitution
“ Did you? You’ve a quick ear.” “I have and a quick eye and a quick brain.” “You need them all in your trade.” “I do especially when I’ve customers like you to deal with. Why don't you tremble?” (a quick ear); (need a quick ear, eye and brain);

8 Repetition “You are cold; you are sick; and you are silly.”
“Prove it,” I rejoined. “I will, in few words. You are cold, because you are alone: no contact strikes the fire from you that is in you. You are sick; because the best of feelings, the highest and the sweetest given to man, keeps far away from you. You are silly, because, suffer as you may, you will not beckon it to approach, nor will you stir one step to meet it where it waits you.”

9 Coherence Conversation Analysis Microstructure Clause relations

10 Conversation Analysis
“It’s like your impudence to say so: I expected it of you; I heard it in your step as you crossed the threshold.” “Did you? You’ve a quick ear.” “I have; and a quick eye and a quick brain.”

11 Microstructure “You are cold; you are sick; and you are silly.”
(generalization) “Prove it,” I rejoined. “I will, in few words. You are cold, because you are alone: no contact strikes the fire from you that is in you. (reason 1) You are sick; because the best of feelings, the highest and the sweetest given to man, keeps far away from you. (reason 2)You are silly, because, suffer as you may, you will not beckon it to approach, nor will you stir one step to meet it where it waits you. (reason 3)”

12 Clause relations (reason-result)
“I will, in few words. You are cold, because you are alone: no contact strikes the fire from you that is in you. You are sick; because the best of feelings, the highest and the sweetest given to man, keeps far away from you. You are silly, because, suffer as you may, you will not beckon it to approach, nor will you stir one step to meet it where it waits you.”

13 Culture In the middle of 19th century, the British people were quite
superstitious and often sought answers from fortune tellers when puzzled. Therefore, they were kind of afraid of the fortune teller who knew their future. “Well, and you want your fortune told?” she said, in a voice as decided as her glance, as harsh as her features. “I don’t care about it, mother; you may please yourself: but I ought to warn you, I have no faith.”

14 “I do; especially when I’ve customers like you to deal
with. Why don't you tremble?” “I'm not cold.” “Why don’t you turn pale?” “I am not sick.” “Why don’t you consult my art?” “I’m not silly.”

15 Critique Reaction to cohesion, coherence and culture
Exposition of power and ideology In relation to inequalities and domination

16 R: “Well, and you want your fortune told
R: “Well, and you want your fortune told?” she said, in a voice as decided as her glance, as harsh as her features. J: “I don’t care about it, mother; you may please yourself: but I ought to warn you, I have no faith.” R: “It’s like your impudence to say so: I expected it of you; I heard it in your step as you crossed the threshold.” J: “Did you? You’ve a quick ear.” R: “You are cold; you are sick; and you are silly.” J: “Prove it.”

17 The fortune-teller shows her advantage and superiority over Jane as she shows to others through his words. Power relations at this situational level help shape the discourse. The fortune-teller asserts his influence and power and attempt to control/dominate the conversation, yet Jane never gives way to her destiny; nor does surrender to the fate prediction told by the teller.

18 Discourse-based activity
Role play You will be divided into 6 groups. Please discuss and play the roles of Jane Eyre and the fortune-teller. Try to show the inner feelings of Jane and the fortune-teller. Your performance will be evaluated according to the following criteria.

19 Group: Criteria Max marks Group marks Total Pronunciation 20
Intonation Fluency Facial Expression Gesture Total 100

20 Thanks for your attention!


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