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Acer x freemanii ‘Jeffersred’ “Autumn Blaze ® maple” SIZE: Medium tree HABIT: Oval - rounded, dense crown FOL: Rich green in summer; long-lasting orange-

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Presentation on theme: "Acer x freemanii ‘Jeffersred’ “Autumn Blaze ® maple” SIZE: Medium tree HABIT: Oval - rounded, dense crown FOL: Rich green in summer; long-lasting orange-"— Presentation transcript:

1 Acer x freemanii ‘Jeffersred’ “Autumn Blaze ® maple” SIZE: Medium tree HABIT: Oval - rounded, dense crown FOL: Rich green in summer; long-lasting orange- red in fall; deeply lobed leaf similar to Acer saccharinum FL. & FR.: Red in Spring; a mix of male and female and hermaphroditic flowers; fruit = a reddish samara in early summer

2 CULTURE: Tolerates most soils; tolerates air pollution but not a great urban tree; does not like salt! PESTS: none serious USE: Specimen tree for lawn, street, or park MISC.: Selected in the 1960’s by nurseryman Glenn Jeffers in Fostoria, OH. Introduced in From seedlings collected from a cross of A. rubrum x A. saccharinum. A. x freemanii was first developed in 1933 at the U.S. National Arboretum by Oliver Freeman

3 Acer negundo “boxelder” SIZE: Medium tree HABIT: Rounded; typically ragged and irregular

4 FOLIAGE: Bright green; pinnately compound leaf!

5 BARK: Mature bark is grayish brown with some ridges and furrows. Twigs tend to be covered with a glucose bloom.

6 FLOWERS and FRUIT: Dioecious, yellow-green in Spring; male flowers in corymbs; female in racemes

7 Corymb A flat-topped collection of flowersA flat-topped collection of flowers

8 Raceme A collection of flowers on a stalk which typically open starting at the bottom and working their way upwardsA collection of flowers on a stalk which typically open starting at the bottom and working their way upwards

9

10 CULTURE: Performs well in poor, wet or dry soils; pH adaptable. Will survive where other trees will not!

11 PESTS: Anthracnose, leaf spot, and powdery mildew; boxelder bugs USE: Weedy, “trash” tree; use only where all other trees fail! MISC.: ‘Flamingo’ = pink shoots with green leaves and white margins. Plant a male selection to eliminate messy female samaras

12 Acer negundo ‘Kelly’s Gold’

13 Acer negundo ‘Variegatum’

14 Acer platanoides “Norway maple” SIZE: Medium HABIT: Rounded, symmetrical crown; dense

15 FOLIAGE: Dark green, changing to yellow; leaves persist on the tree late in the fall

16 BARK: Grayish black with some ridges at maturity.

17 FLOWERS and FRUIT: Perfect, yellow to greenish-yellow in corymbs in April before the leaves (somewhat showy); schizocarp = 4” long, 140 o angle

18 CULTURE: Soil adaptable; tolerates sand and clay; pH adaptable; tolerates air pollution (ozone and sulfur dioxide); tolerates some shade; will NOT tolerate 2,4-D (a broadleaf herbicide); easily transplanted

19 PESTS: Leaf scorch; sun scald

20 USE: Lawn, street, or park tree; over-planted MISC.: Invasive! difficult to grow turf underneath; ‘Columnare’ = upright form; ‘Crimson King’ = red leaves; ‘Drummondii’ = white margin.

21 Acer platanoides ‘Columnare’

22 Acer platanoides ‘Crimson King’

23 Acer platanoides ‘Drummondii’

24 Acer platanoides ‘Globosum’

25 Acer platanoides (Dwarf Forms)

26 Acer platanoides ‘Bailpride’

27 Acer rubrum “red maple” SIZE: Medium to Large HABIT: Pyramidal/elliptical when young Irregular to rounded crown when mature

28 FOL: Dark green above and grayish below; new leaves are reddish; yellow to red in fall

29 BARK: soft gray or gray brown with prominent “target facing”

30 FL. & FR.: Red flowers in dense clusters before leaves (showy) which are male, female or mixed; reddish schizocarp with samaras at a 60 o angle

31 CULTURE: Tolerates most soils; tolerates air pollution but not a great urban tree; does not tolerate salt well PESTS: chlorosis at high pH due to manganese deficiency

32 USE: Specimen tree for lawn, street, or park MISC.: Often one of the first trees to color in fall; fall color is inconsistent and a cultivar must be used to assure a red color such as Red Sunset ® (= A. rubrum ‘Franksred’) which is very cold-hardy & commonly used

33 Acer rubrum 'Columnare'

34 Acer saccharinum “silver maple” SIZE: Large HABIT: Oval to rounded crown, pendulous branchlets are upturned

35 FOL: Medium green above and gray-silver below; can be a nice butter-yellow in fall

36 BARK: similar to A. rubrum when young. At maturity becomes gray with ridges and furrowes.

37 FL. & FR.: Greenish-yellow (apetalous); open before leaves and before A. rubrum; flowers in dense clusters and are male, female, or mixed; largest schizocarp (4+”) with samaras at 90 o angle

38 CULTURE: Tolerates most soils; tolerates poor soil; prefers moist soil; very easy to grow PESTS: Many... anthracnose, leaf hopper, cottony maple scale; manganese chlorosis at high pH

39 USE: Good for fast shade or rugged conditions; becomes a liability with age; roots will buckle sidewalks and clog drains MISC.: Trees break up in ice; weak-wooded

40 Acer saccharum “sugar maple” SIZE: Large HABIT: Rounded to upright oval; cultivar dependent oval; cultivar dependent

41 FOL: Medium green (lighter than A. platanoides); yellow and orange in fall (some reds), typically all colors on one tree!

42 BARK: Extremely variable. Young trees tend to develop smooth gray brown bark that becomes deeply furrowed with age. At maturity some trees have thick plates and ridges where as others will appear scaly.

43 FL. & FR.: Greenish-yellow; in corymbs before leaves (not showy); schizocarp shaped like a horseshoe

44 CULTURE: pH tolerant; requires room for roots; tolerates shade; does NOT tolerate air pollution, soil compaction, or salt PESTS: Leaf scorch USE: Excellent shade tree; lawns, parks, golf courses (not as a street tree)

45 MISC.: Sap boiled in spring yields maple syrup; 40 gallons of sap = 1 gal. of syrup; ‘Newton Sentry’ = very tight, columnar habit; ‘Temple’s Upright’ = columnar habit

46 Acer saccharum 'Monumentalis'

47 Acer saccharum 'Newton sentry'

48 Kalopanax septemlobus “castor-aralia” SIZE: Large HABIT: Upright-oval when young becoming rounded-oval when mature

49 FOL: Coarse texture; dark green in summer, often falling green (yellow fall color is rare)

50

51 BARK: branches armed with stout prickles. Mature trunks are blackish and deeply furrowed.

52 FL. & FR.: perfect, white in mid-summer; clusters of small flowers in 1” umbels; somewhat showy; fruit = black, globose drupe in early fall

53 CULTURE: prefers deep, rich, moist soil; full sun PESTS: None USE: Excellent shade tree; lawns, parks, golf courses MISC.: Bees like the flowers and birds love the fruit. Rare in cultivation but a worthwhile plant for large spaces. “septemlobus” means “7-lobed”. Looks like Ricinus communis (“caster bean”) “septemlobus” means “7-lobed”. Looks like Ricinus communis (“caster bean”) Previously named K. pictus

54 Kalopanax septemlobus. var. maximowiczii

55 Betula “birch” All birch are monoeciousAll birch are monoecious All birch have staminate (male) and pistillate (female) catkinsAll birch have staminate (male) and pistillate (female) catkins Male catkins are formed in late summer and retained through the winterMale catkins are formed in late summer and retained through the winter Female catkins form in spring, are pollinated, and disperse their winged nutlets in late summer-early fallFemale catkins form in spring, are pollinated, and disperse their winged nutlets in late summer-early fall Related to alders (Alnus)Related to alders (Alnus)

56 Betula alleghaniensis “yellow birch” SIZE: Large HABIT: Pyramidal when young; rounded with age; in woods forms a central in woods forms a central leader; largest native birch leader; largest native birch

57 FOL: Dull dark green; excellent medium yellow in fall

58 BARK: Peeling, light yellowish brown. Stems have the taste of wintergreen.

59 FL. & FR.: Male catkins pendulous, terminal in 4’s; 1” female catkin is solitary, elliptic and upright on spur shoots

60 CULTURE: Prefers cool, moist soils and cool summers; does NOT tolerate hot and dry conditions PESTS: None serious; resistant to Japanese beetles, leaf miner and bronze birch borer USE: Nice lawn tree or specimen MISC.: Important lumber tree in Canada for furniture, flooring, and doors; oil of wintergreen not as strong as B. lenta; peeling yellow-brown bark; native

61 Betula lenta “black birch” SIZE: Medium HABIT: Pyramidal and dense when young; rounded to upright oval when mature

62 FOL: Lustrous dark green; golden yellow in fall

63 BARK: Dark brown to black on young trees with prominent lenticels. The bark becomes more scaly at maturity.

64 FL. & FR.: Male catkins pendulous, terminal in 4’s; 3/4” female catkin is solitary, narrow and upright on spur shoot

65 CULTURE: Tolerates heavy soils PESTS: None serious; resistant to Japanese beetle, leaf miner, and bronze birch borer USE: Excellent tree for parks and naturalized areas MISC.: Best fall color among the birches; wintergreen oil can be distilled from the bark (high oil content); darkest bark of all birch; “lenta” means “pliable”; native

66 Betula nigra “river birch” SIZE: Medium to large HABIT: Pyramidal when young; rounded with age; often multiple trunks

67 FOL: Lustrous, medium green; faded yellow fall color (not very effective in the north), drops quickly

68 BARK: Peeling creamy salmon, orange brown to cinnamon brown in color. One of the most beautiful birches for winter interest.

69 FL. & FR.: Male catkins terminal in 3’s; 1” pendulous female catkin

70 CULTURE: Does best in moist, acid, fertile soils (bottomlands); will tolerate dry conditions and some compact soil; iron chlorosis in high pH; can tolerate warmer climates (Zone 8) PESTS: None USE: Specimen tree for large areas; widely used in the heat of the South MISC.: ‘Heritage’ is a superior cultivar for rapid growth, vigor, darker green foliage and better yellow fall color; incredible peeling reddish-tan bark; native

71 Betula papyrifera “paper birch” SIZE: Medium to large HABIT: Loosely pyramidal when young; irregular, upright oval when mature; single or multi-trunked

72 FOL: Dull dark green; very good yellow fall color

73 Bark: Mature plants have chalky white peeling bark that is easily separated into paper like layers.

74 FL.& FR.: Male catkin terminal in 2’s or 3’s; 1” pendulous, female catkin

75 CULTURE: Soil adaptable; prefers moist, acid, sandy or silty loams; does NOT tolerate air pollution PESTS: Leaf miner; resistant to bronze birch borer

76 USE: Best in large areas MISC.: Place in front of evergreens for winter bark interest; outstanding peeling, white bark; native

77 Betula pendula “European white birch” SIZE: Medium HABIT: Gracefully pyramidal when young; upright-oval when mature; remains pendulous and graceful

78 FOL: Glossy, dark green; poor yellow fall color

79 BARK: Mature bark is white and does not peel or exfoliate. Bark often has diamond shaped areas of black within.

80 FL. & FR.: Male catkin in 2’s, sometimes singly or in 3’s; 1” pendulous, female catkin

81 CULTURE: Prefers MWDS; tolerates wet or dry soils; pH tolerant; “bleeds” readily so prune in summer or fall PESTS: Very susceptible to bronze birch borer(Agrilus anxius) and leaf miners; Japanese beetles are not a serious pest

82 USE: Specimen for lawn or large areas MISC.: Most common birch in N. America. ‘Dalecarlica’ is an elegant cultivar with deeply incised leaves; ‘Purpurea’ is a purple-leaved form; ‘Youngii’ is weeping form, often grafted.

83 Betula pendula ‘Dalecarlica’

84 Betula pendula ‘Youngii’

85 Betula pendula ‘Purpurea’

86 Betula populifolia “gray birch” SIZE: Medium HABIT: Narrow, open, conical crown; tips of branches are pendulous

87 FOL: Glossy, dark green; nice yellow fall color; one of the first birches to leaf-out

88 Bark: Chalky white, not as bright as paper birch. Bark does not peel and has distinct black markings below each branch.

89 FL. & FR.: Very long male catkins borne singly, rarely in 2’s; 1” pendulous, female catkin

90 CULTURE: Prefers poor, sterile rocky, gravelly or sandy sites; will tolerate heavy soils; tolerates wet or dry conditions; will not tolerate competition or basic soils PESTS: Leaf miner and Japanese beetles can be devastating; slightly resistant to bronze birch borer

91 USE: Good for naturalizing; good for difficult sites with poor soils MISC.: Short-lived tree (15-20 years); dirty gray bark; native

92 Catalpa speciosa “northern catalpa” SIZE: Medium HABIT: Open with an irregular- oval crown

93 FOL: Medium to light green; a poor yellow-brown fall color (not effective)

94 BARK: Grayish brown at maturity with a ridged and thick look.

95 FL. & FR.: White tube-shaped corolla, 2” long and wide, purple spot in throat, in May-June in upright terminal panicles 4-8” long; fruit = an 8-20” long, 1/2” wide “pod-like” capsule that persists through winter

96 CULTURE: Tolerates most soils; tolerates wet, hot, dry or alkaline conditions; full sun to partial shade PESTS: Leaf spots, powdery mildew, aphids and sooty mold USE: Best for difficult areas (roadways); coarse texture difficult to use in the home landscape

97 MISC.: Wood is very rot resistant and used as railroad ties.

98 Cercidiphyllum japonicum “katsura tree” SIZE: Medium HABIT: Pyramidal when young; variable habit when mature

99 FOL: New foliage is reddish-purple; dark blue-green in summer; yellow-apricot in fall

100 BARK: Mature bark is brown and can be slightly shaggy.

101 FL. & FR.: Dioecious; flowers are minute; flowers before the leaves yet are not showy; fruit is a pod and not showy

102 CULTURE: Requires a moist, rich soil; pH adaptable; difficult to transplant (best B & B in early spring) PESTS: None serious; scorch on foliage when dry

103 USE: Excellent in either a lawn or large area MISC.: A beautiful foliage tree; ‘Pendula’ is a weeping form (usually grafted); “Cercid” refers to “redbud” (Cercis) and “phyllum” refers to the “leaf”

104 Cercidiphyllum japonicum ‘Pendula’

105 Cercidiphyllum japonicum ‘Red Fox’

106 Cercidiphyllum japonicum ‘Ruby’

107 Fagus grandifolia “American beech” SIZE: Medium to large HABIT: Stout trunk; broad, low-spreading limbs; pyramidal low-spreading limbs; pyramidalhabit

108 FOL: Medium green; golden yellow in fall; persist into winter (tan)

109 BARK: Appears thin and smooth. Has a clean bluish gray appearance.

110 FL. & FR.: Monoecious; not showy; nut in a prickly involucre (3/4”); nut is edible

111 CULTURE: MWDS; does NOT tolerate wet or compacted soils; shallow roots; tolerates shade; tolerates pruning PESTS: Beech scale; aphids; powdery mildew USE: Native tree; for large areas only; attracts wildlife

112 MISC.: Tolerates heat better than F. sylvatica; will root sucker; difficult to grow grass under; NO cultivar selections. Fagus is from the Greek, “phagein” (= “to eat”), referring to the edible nuts.

113 Fagus sylvatica “European beech” SIZE: Medium to large HABIT: Stout trunk; branching to the ground; pyramidal

114 FOL: Lustrous, dark green; golden-bronze in fall; persist into winter (tan)

115 BARK: Similar to F. grandifolia but generally darker. Very ornamental.

116 FL. & FR.: Monoecious; not showy; nut in a prickly involucre (1”); nut is edible

117 CULTURE: Tolerates adverse soil better than F. grandifolia but otherwise the same PESTS: Same as F. grandifolia USE: Specimens for large areas (parks, etc.); attracts wildlife MISC.: The most variable of all ornamental shade trees. The best cultivars:‘Asplenifolia’ = cut-leaf; ‘Fastigiata’ = upright; ‘Pendula’ = weeping; ‘Purpurea’ = dark purple leaf. Small growing cultivars are now available for residential use. The name, “sylvatica” come from the Latin, “silva” meaning “of the woods”

118 Fagus sylvatica var. purpurea

119 Fagus sylvatica ‘Pendula’

120 Fagus sylvatica ‘Asplenifolia’

121 Fagus sylvatica ‘Ansorgei’

122 Fagus sylvatica ‘Aurea Pendula’

123 Fagus sylvatica ‘Quercifolia’

124 Fagus sylvatica ‘Tricolor’

125 Quercus “oaks” All oaks are monoeciousAll oaks are monoecious All oaks have staminate (male) catkins and pistillate (female) axillary flowersAll oaks have staminate (male) catkins and pistillate (female) axillary flowers Nuts are acorns (edible) with a cup which is an involucre (collection of bracts)Nuts are acorns (edible) with a cup which is an involucre (collection of bracts) Often have tap roots and are difficult to transplantOften have tap roots and are difficult to transplant Often have dense wood & are slow-growingOften have dense wood & are slow-growing species of oaks exist species of oaks exist

126 “white” oaks vs. “red” oaks White oaks have rounded leaves while red oaks have bristle-tipped foliageWhite oaks have rounded leaves while red oaks have bristle-tipped foliage The inside of the acorn is smooth in white oaks but is hairy in red oaksThe inside of the acorn is smooth in white oaks but is hairy in red oaks White oak seeds take 1 year to mature while red oak seeds take 2 yearsWhite oak seeds take 1 year to mature while red oak seeds take 2 years White oak seeds germinate immediately after they drop to the ground and therefore need to be planted or immediately refrigerated, while red oak seeds only germinate in springWhite oak seeds germinate immediately after they drop to the ground and therefore need to be planted or immediately refrigerated, while red oak seeds only germinate in spring

127 Quercus alba “white oak” SIZE: Medium to large HABIT: Pyramidal when young; broad- rounded when mature

128 FOL: Opens gray-pink; blue-green in summer; red-purple in fall (can be nice!); leaves often persist into winter

129 BARK: Often broken into small blocks and scales. Light gray in color.

130 FL. & FR.: Acorn = 1” oblong with bumpy cup

131 CULTURE: Deep, MWDS; mycorrhizal association with roots; production and transplant difficult PESTS: Powdery mildew; leaf galls; etc...

132 USE: Large areas; naturalizing; attracts wildlife MISC.: Wood used in furniture, flooring, boats, and casks. No other North American oak has so many famous and historic specimens as this species. “alba” refers to the light color of the wood. Native

133 Quercus bicolor “swamp white oak” SIZE: Medium HABIT: Broad, open, rounded crown

134 FOL: Lustrous, dark green; yellow in fall; leaves often persist into winter when young

135 BARK: Grayish brown and often divided into distinct rectangular patterns.

136 FL. & FR.: Acorn = 1” oval in pairs, usually stalked

137 CULTURE: Difficult to transplant; not as tolerant of adverse conditions as Q. palustris and Q. rubra; tolerates higher pH than Q. palustris; fast grower PESTS: None USE: Naturalizing, large areas, attracts wildlife MISC.: One of the last oaks to develop fall color… and it is often the best! Rare in commerce and often misidentified! Native

138 Quercus imbricaria “shingle oak” SIZE: Medium HABIT: Pyramidal in youth; broad-round at maturity broad-round at maturity

139 FOL: Unfolds reddish; lustrous dark green in summer; yellow-brown-russet in fall (not showy); leaves often persist into winter

140 BARK: Gray brown with low ridges and some furrows.

141 FL. & FR.: Acorn = 1/2”, rounded

142 CULTURE: Transplants easier than most oaks; tolerates urban conditions; tolerates dry sites; tolerates pruning PESTS: Few problems USE: Naturalizing large areas, attracts wildlife; can be used for hedges MISC.: Wood used for roofing and wall shingles! Gets its name from the Latin, “imbrex” meaning “tile”. Native

143 Quercus macrocarpa “bur oak” SIZE: Large HABIT: Pyramidal/oval when young; broad-spreading crown when mature

144 FOL: Lustrous dark green in summer; green-yellow-brown in fall (not showy)

145 BARK: Mature bark develops deep ridges. Usually dark gray and almost dirty looking.

146 FL. & FR.: Acorn = /2” with deep, frilled cup

147 CULTURE: Soil adaptable but transplant is difficult; prefers alkaline soils; tolerates city conditions PESTS: Few problems USE: Large areas, naturalizing, attract wildlife MISC.: The name is derived from the Greek, “macro” meaning “large” and “karpos” meaning “fruit”. Rather rare in commerce. Native

148 Quercus palustris “pin oak” SIZE: Medium to large HABIT: Pyramidal through maturity

149 FOL: Lustrous dark green in summer; russet in fall (variable); leaves may persist into winter

150 BARK: Grayish brown, develops shallow ridges with age. Distinctive pins on the branches.

151 FL. & FR.: Acorn = 1/2” rounded, in clusters

152 CULTURE: MWDS; easily transplanted; tolerates wet soils; tolerates air pollution and city conditions; does NOT tolerate high pH (chlorosis!) PESTS: Leaf galls, iron chlorosis

153 USE: Shade tree, lawns, parks; attracts wildlife; naturalizing MISC.: Lower branches will die out and require pruning; very widely used; fast grower. “palustris” is from the Latin meaning “swamps or marshes”. Native

154 Quercus robur ‘Fastigiata’ “fastigiate English oak” SIZE: Medium to large HABIT: Columnar with wavy, ascending branches wavy, ascending branches

155 FOL: Dull dark green in summer; NO fall color - leaves fall off green

156 BARK: Mature bark is deeply furrowed and grayish black.

157 FL. & FR.: Acorn = 1” elongate, stalked, rare on the cultivar

158 CULTURE: MWDS; pH tolerant PESTS: Powdery mildew USE: Large areas; attract wildlife MISC.: The species is widely used in Europe but is rare in the U.S. Other cultivars available

159 Quercus rubra “red oak” SIZE: Medium to large HABIT: Upright elliptic when young; rounded when mature

160 FOL: Pinkish-red when unfolding; lustrous dark green in summer; russet to bright red in fall

161 BARK: Mature bark has distinct flat gray areas as well as ridges and furrows.

162 FL. & FR.: Acorn = 1” globose-elliptic

163 CULTURE: MWDS; transplants easily; tolerates air pollution; high pH = chlorosis PESTS: None

164 USE: Excellent for lawns or large areas; ok as street tree; attracts wildlife; naturalizing MISC.: Fast grower. Extremely common in cultivation. Native


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