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CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT IN ELEMENTARY SCIENCE DAY 1 JENNIFER GOTTLIEB & MIKE KLEIN.

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Presentation on theme: "CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT IN ELEMENTARY SCIENCE DAY 1 JENNIFER GOTTLIEB & MIKE KLEIN."— Presentation transcript:

1 CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT IN ELEMENTARY SCIENCE DAY 1 JENNIFER GOTTLIEB & MIKE KLEIN

2 WELCOME! WHICH QUOTE RESONATES WITH YOU? WHY?

3 The purpose of this session is to support teachers as they design, implement, and interpret classroom level formative assessments that incorporate the three dimensions of science learning (Science and Engineering Practices, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Crosscutting Concepts).

4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cU2dZz18P0c&list=PL772556F1EFC4D01C&index =11

5 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2KZb2_vcNTg&index=3&list=PL772556F1EFC4D01C

6 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT What do I want them to know, understand, or do? What are they thinking? Formative Assessment

7 HOW CAN FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT IMPROVE TEACHING AND LEARNING?

8 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT CLASSROOM TECHNIQUES ( FACT S) What are some reasons for using formative assessment? (page 6)

9 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT Read pages What do I want them to know, understand, or do? What are they thinking? Formative Assessment

10 5E LEARNING CYCLE Engage Explore Explain Elaborate Evaluate

11 5E LEARNING CYCLE Engage Explore Explain Elaborate Evaluate

12 “If students answer all the teacher’s questions correctly, the teacher is surely wasting the students’ time. Worthwhile questions cause students to struggle and think.” ~Dylan William

13 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT AND THE NEXT GENERATION SCIENCE STANDARDS

14 ARCHITECTURE OF THE NGSS Science and Engineering Practices Crosscutting Concepts Disciplinary Core Ideas

15 PERFORMANCE EXPECTATIONS Science and Engineering Practices Crosscutting Concepts Disciplinary Core Ideas Where do each of the three dimensions show up in the performance expectations?

16 NGSS CLASSROOM SAMPLE ASSESSMENT TASKS

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20 NGSS/CCSS-M SAMPLE CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT TASKS Read the Purpose and Overview How might these be useful to us?

21 NGSS/CCSS-M SAMPLE CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT TASKS Read the Middle School Task What do you think?

22 “Too often, educational tests, grades, and report cards are treated by teachers as autopsies when they should be viewed as physicals.” ~Reeves

23 DEVELOPING A FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT TOOL BOX

24 “Surfacing student misconceptions is at the very heart of the learning process.” ~Brent Duckor

25 QUICK START TOOLS With a partner, choose 2- 3 tools and highlight them on a whiteboard.

26 PROCESS TOOLS

27 Formative assessment is not the goal; it is a means to achieving a teaching or learning goal. Page Keeley

28 SELECTING THE RIGHT FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT TOOL Read pages What do I want them to know, understand, or do? What are they thinking? Formative Assessment

29 Card Sorts Formative Assessment Tool Science & Engineering Practices Engaging in argument from evidence Crosscutting Concepts Patterns Structure and Function Disciplinary Core Ideas PS1.A Different kinds of matter exist and many of them can be either solid or liquid, depending on temperature… What do I want them to know, understand, or do?

30 CARD SORT Is it a solid? rock ice rubber band sponge sugar

31 Science & Engineering Practices Crosscutting ConceptsDisciplinary Core Ideas What do I want them to know, understand, or do? How might you use Card Sorts in your content area?

32 Sequencing/Ranking Formative Assessment Tool Science & Engineering Practices Analyzing and interpreting data Engaging in argument from evidence Crosscutting Concepts Patterns Disciplinary Core Ideas ESS1.A Patterns of the motion of the sun, moon, and stars in the sky can be observed, described, and predicted. What do I want them to know, understand, or do?

33 SEQUENCING/RANKING Think about how the sun seems to move across the sky. Cut out the pictures your teacher gives you and put them in order.

34 Science & Engineering Practices Crosscutting ConceptsDisciplinary Core Ideas What do I want them to know, understand, or do? How might you use Sequencing/Ranking in your content area?

35 Representation Analysis Formative Assessment Tool Science & Engineering Practices Developing and Using Models Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information Crosscutting Concepts Scale, Proportion, and Quantity Systems and System Models Disciplinary Core Ideas ESS1.B The orbits of Earth around the sun and of the moon around the Earth, together with the rotation of Earth about an axis… What do I want them to know, understand, or do?

36 REPRESENTATION ANALYSIS What aspects of this representation of the Earth and sun may lead to misunderstandings or are incorrect? Explain your thinking. How might you improve the representation?

37 Science & Engineering Practices Crosscutting ConceptsDisciplinary Core Ideas What do I want them to know, understand, or do? How might you use Representation Analysis in your content area?

38 Concept Cartoons Formative Assessment Tool Science & Engineering Practices Engaging in argument from evidence Constructing explanations Crosscutting Concepts Energy and Matter Cause and Effect Disciplinary Core Ideas LS1.C Plants acquire their material for growth chiefly from air and water. What do I want them to know, understand, or do?

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40 Science & Engineering Practices Crosscutting ConceptsDisciplinary Core Ideas What do I want them to know, understand, or do? How might you use Concept Cartoons in your content area?

41 Friendly Talk Formative Assessment Tool Science & Engineering Practices Engaging in Argument from Evidence Crosscutting Concepts Cause and Effect Disciplinary Core Ideas LS1.C Plants need water and light to live and grow. What do I want them to know, understand, or do?

42 FRIENDLY TALK Carl: I think the plants in the dark closet will be the tallest. Monique: I think the plants by the sunny window will be the tallest. Jasmine:I think the plants will be about the same height. Drew:I think the plants in the closet will stop growing and die. Which friend do you agree with and why? Explain your thinking.

43 Science & Engineering Practices Crosscutting ConceptsDisciplinary Core Ideas What do I want them to know, understand, or do? How might you use Friendly Talk in your content area?

44 Familiar Phenomenon Probe Formative Assessment Tool Science & Engineering Practices Engaging in Argument from Evidence Constructing Explanations Developing and Using Models Crosscutting Concepts Cause and Effect Disciplinary Core Ideas PS1.A The amount (weight) of matter is conserved when it changes form, even in transitions in which it seems to vanish. What do I want them to know, understand, or do?

45 FAMILIAR PHENOMENON PROBE A.The mass of the warm balloon is less than the mass of the cold balloon. B.The mass of the warm balloon is greater than the mass of the cold balloon. C.The mass of the warm balloon is the same as the mass of the cold balloon.

46 Science & Engineering Practices Crosscutting ConceptsDisciplinary Core Ideas What do I want them to know, understand, or do? How might you use a Familiar Phenomenon Probe in your content area? Phenomenon: A. B. C. D. E. F.

47 Data Match Formative Assessment Tool Science & Engineering Practices Analyzing and Interpreting Data Crosscutting Concepts Patterns Disciplinary Core Ideas PS2.A The patterns of an object’s motion in various situations can be observed and measured; when the past motion exhibits… What do I want them to know, understand, or do?

48 DATA MATCH Length = 20 cm Mass = 50 grams Mass (grams) Time to swing back and forth 5 times (seconds) Length (cm) Time to swing back and forth 5 times (seconds)

49 Science & Engineering Practices Crosscutting ConceptsDisciplinary Core Ideas What do I want them to know, understand, or do? How might you use Data Match in your content area?

50 Missed Conception Formative Assessment Tool Science & Engineering Practices Constructing Explanations Crosscutting Concepts Cause and Effect Disciplinary Core Ideas PS4.B Objects can be seen if light is available to illuminate them or If they give off their own light. What do I want them to know, understand, or do?

51 MISSED CONCEPTION Missed Conception: I can see objects in a completely dark room as long as my eyes have time to get used to it. 1. Why do you think some people have this idea about light? 2. What things could you do to help someone understand the scientific explanation? How would this help someone give up his or her original idea in favor of a scientific one? 3. Did you ever have a similar Missed Conception at the beginning of this unit or sometime during your life? Do you think you might still hold on to your previous ideas or parts of them? How and/or why has your thinking changed or not changed?

52 Science & Engineering Practices Crosscutting ConceptsDisciplinary Core Ideas What do I want them to know, understand, or do? How might you use a Missed Conception in your content area?

53 P-E-O Probes (Predict-Explain-Observe) Formative Assessment Tool Science & Engineering Practices Constructing Explanations Planning and Carrying Out Investigations Crosscutting Concepts Cause and Effect Disciplinary Core Ideas PS2.A …Forces that do not sum to zero can cause changes in the object’s speed or direction of motion. What do I want them to know, understand, or do?

54 PREDICT-EXPLAIN-OBSERVE

55 Science & Engineering Practices Crosscutting ConceptsDisciplinary Core Ideas What do I want them to know, understand, or do? How might you use a P-E-O Probe in your content area?

56 A & D Statements Formative Assessment Tool Science & Engineering Practices Engaging in Argument from Evidence Crosscutting Concepts Structure and Function Disciplinary Core Ideas PS1.A Measurement of a variety of properties can be used to identify materials… What do I want them to know, understand, or do?

57 A & D STATEMENTS

58 Science & Engineering Practices Crosscutting ConceptsDisciplinary Core Ideas What do I want them to know, understand, or do? How might you use A & D Statements in your content area?

59 “It is through our assessment that we communicate most clearly to students which activities and learning outcomes we value.” ~NCTM Assessment Standards

60 TWO MINUTE PAPER (PAGE 204) What was the most important thing you learned today? How do you plan to apply what you learned today?

61 THANK YOU!

62 SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENTS: WHAT’S COMING?

63 DEVELOPING ASSESSMENTS FOR THE NGSS National Research Council Board on Testing and Assessment Board on Science Education Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

64 SOME OF THE MAIN MESSAGES New types of assessments are needed NGSS assessment should start with the needs of classroom teaching and learning States must create coherent systems of assessment to support both classroom learning and policy/ monitoring functions Implementation should be gradual, systematic, carefully prioritized, and attend to equity Professional development and adequate support for teachers will be critical

65 SYSTEM OF ASSESSMENT Assessment to support classroom teaching and learning Assessment for monitoring student learning Indicators of opportunity-to-learn (OTL)

66 WHAT MIGHT THESE ASSESSMENTS LOOK LIKE? Tasks should ask students to apply practices in the context of disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts. Science and Engineering Practices Crosscutting Concepts Disciplinary Core Ideas

67 WHAT MIGHT THESE ASSESSMENTS LOOK LIKE? Need multi-component tasks that use a variety of response formats: Selected response questions Short and extended constructed response questions Performance tasks Classroom discourse

68 SYSTEM OF ASSESSMENT Assessment to support classroom teaching and learning Assessment for monitoring student learning Indicators of opportunity-to-learn (OTL)

69 BIODIVERSITY IN THE SCHOOLYARD 5 TH GRADE EXAMPLE

70 5 TH GRADE EXAMPLE: BIODIVERSITY IN THE SCHOOLYARD Where are the three dimensions assessed in this series of classroom assessment tasks? Science and Engineering Practices Crosscutting Concepts Disciplinary Core Ideas

71 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT TASKS Collect data on the number of animals (abundance) and the number of different species (richness) in schoolyard zones Task 1 Create bar graphs that illustrate patterns in abundance and richness data from each of the schoolyard zones Task 2 Construct an explanation to support your answer to the question: Which zone of the schoolyard has the greatest biodiversity? Task 3

72 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT Collect data on the number of animals (abundance) and the number of different species (richness) in schoolyard zones Task 1

73 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT Create bar graphs that illustrate patterns in abundance and richness data from each of the schoolyard zones Task 2

74 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT Construct an explanation to support your answer to the question: Which zone of the schoolyard has the greatest biodiversity? Task 3 scaffold

75 SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT Construct an explanation to support an answer to the question: Which zone of the schoolyard has the greatest biodiversity?

76 5 TH GRADE EXAMPLE: BIODIVERSITY IN THE SCHOOLYARD Disciplinary Core Idea Biodiversity Crosscutting Concept Patterns Practices Planning and carrying out investigations Analyzing and interpreting data Constructing explanations Science and Engineering Practices Crosscutting Concepts Disciplinary Core Ideas

77 SYSTEM OF ASSESSMENT Assessment to support classroom teaching and learning Assessment for monitoring student learning Indicators of opportunity-to-learn (OTL)

78 PLATE TECTONICS MIDDLE SCHOOL EXAMPLE

79 MIDDLE SCHOOL EXAMPLE: PLATE TECTONICS Where are the three dimensions assessed in this performance task? Science and Engineering Practices Crosscutting Concepts Disciplinary Core Ideas

80 PERFORMANCE TASK Draw a model of a volcano formation at a hot spot using arrows to show movement in the model. Be sure to label all parts of the model. Use your model to explain what happens with the plate and what happens at the hot spot when a volcano forms. Draw a model to show the side view (cross-section) of volcano formation near a plate boundary (at a subduction zone or divergent boundary). Be sure to label all parts of your model. Use your model to explain what happens when a volcano forms near a plate boundary.

81 PERFORMANCE TASK The hot spot allows the magma to move up into the crust where it forms a volcano. The magma pushes up through the crust and goes up and erupts.

82 MIDDLE SCHOOL EXAMPLE: PLATE TECTONICS Disciplinary Core Idea Plate tectonics Crosscutting Concept Patterns Scale Practices Developing and using models Science and Engineering Practices Crosscutting Concepts Disciplinary Core Ideas

83 DEVELOPING ASSESSMENTS FOR THE NGSS Remember: This is a report about what kind of assessments need to be developed for NGSS. No one has developed these assessments yet. The examples included in the report (and today’s presentation) are things the committee saw and said…”Oh yes…something like that might work…”

84 WELCOME BACK! CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT IN ELEMENTARY SCIENCE – DAY 2

85 WELCOME BACK!

86

87

88 CONGA LINE! In my classroom, I can tell students are learning when they…. One new thing I’ve tried since our last meeting is…..

89 The purpose of this session is to support teachers as they design, implement, and interpret classroom level formative assessments that incorporate the three dimensions of science learning (Science and Engineering Practices, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Crosscutting Concepts).

90 SCIENCE NOTEBOOKS

91 For your “reason”: What’s the big idea? What’s the connection to formative assessment? What might this look like in your classroom?

92 5E LEARNING CYCLE Engage Explore Explain Elaborate Evaluate

93 Which notebook prompts and/or templates resonate with you? How might these allow you to know what they are thinking?

94 FEEDBACK TO STUDENTS

95 Brainstorm: What types of feedback do we give our students?

96 “Recurring, nonthreatening feedback encourages students to persist. As some teachers say, ‘You don’t know it yet.’” ~Cathy Vatterott

97 WHAT WOULD YOU DO?

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101 WHAT’S THE TAKE-AWAY?

102 So what kind of feedback will help students grow?

103

104 AUSTIN’S BUTTERFLY How might we foster a culture of excellence in our classrooms?

105 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0yetHqWODp0

106 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45mMioJ5szc

107 LIFE = RISK What are some things we might do to create learning environments where students are comfortable taking risks?

108 EFFECTIVE FEEDBACK Read the first two pages. What do you think? At your table, divide up the 7 keys to essential feedback. Read about your “key” and teach the rest of your table about it. Use the bookmark to take notes and to consider how each key applies to your class.

109 PROVIDING FEEDBACK

110 Mr. Miller has three different balls. Each is about the same size with a different mass. Ball 1 is a wooden ball. Its mass is 28 g. Ball 2 is a golf ball. Its mass is 46 g. Ball 3 is a metal ball. Its mass is 110 g. He holds his arms out and drops the three balls at the same time from the same height. In what order will the balls hit the floor?

111 Prediction A: Ball 1, then ball 2, then ball 3. Prediction B: Ball 3, then ball 2, then ball 1. Prediction C: Ball 2, then ball 3, then ball 1. Prediction D: All three balls will hit the floor at about the same time. Prediction E: Ball 3 will hit first, followed by ball 1 and ball 2 hitting the floor at the same time. Choose a prediction and explain your thinking. What “rule” or reasoning did you use to make your prediction? 28 g46 g 110 g

112 112 Focus Question: In what order will the balls hit the floor? Teacher-created exemplar: (Claim) All three balls will hit the floor at the same time. (Evidence) The reason is that they are all the same shape and size. (Science Reasoning) Gravity causes objects to fall at the same rate, but air resistance can cause some things to fall slower. The shape and size of an object determines how much air pushes up on it and slows down its fall (air resistance). When objects are the same size and shape, they have the same amount of air pushing up on them, so they will fall at the same rate. Since the balls are all the same size and shape, they will fall at the same rate and hit the ground at the same time. (Counter Argument) Some people might think that mass will matter and that the metal ball will hit the ground first because it is heavier. We observed in class that only shape and size matter.

113 ANALYZING FEEDBACK

114 USE THE KEYS TO ANALYZE THE FEEDBACK I chose prediction D because we did this in class with a metal ball and wooden ball and they both were about equal when they fell. Great job!!

115 USE THE KEYS TO ANALYZE THE FEEDBACK I chose prediction D because we did this in class with a metal ball and wooden ball and they both were about equal when they fell. What was it about the metal ball and the wooden ball that made them fall at the same rate?

116 USE THE KEYS TO ANALYZE THE FEEDBACK I chose prediction D because we did this in class with a metal ball and wooden ball and they both were about equal when they fell. What about the golf ball?

117 USE THE KEYS TO ANALYZE THE FEEDBACK I chose prediction D because we did this in class with a metal ball and wooden ball and they both were about equal when they fell. Too vague!

118 WHAT FEEDBACK MIGHT YOU GIVE?

119 WHAT WOULD YOU DO? STUDENT 1 What written feedback might be helpful for this student? I chose prediction D because we did this in class with a metal ball and wooden ball and they both were about equal when they fell.

120 WHAT WOULD YOU DO? STUDENT 2 What written feedback might be helpful for this student? I think all 3 balls will hit the floor about the same time because they all have the same mass and same size.

121 WHAT WOULD YOU DO? STUDENT 3 What written feedback might be helpful for this student? I think it is D because everything has the same amount of gravity fource.

122 SCIENCE NOTEBOOKS: DO HEAVY THINGS FALL FASTER THAN LIGHT THINGS?

123 WHAT ARE WE LOOKING FOR IN A WRITTEN RESPONSE? CLAIM: Answers the question correctly EVIDENCE: Provides several pieces of evidence to support answer

124 PROVIDING FEEDBACK TO STUDENTS What did you actually observe? What are the important details that another scientist would need to know? What evidence do you have to support your thinking? Does what you have written agree with the data you recorded? What questions do you have now?

125 What did you actually observe? What are the important details that another scientist would need to know? What evidence do you have to support your thinking? Does what you have written agree with the data you recorded? What questions do you have now? What would you say to this student to move their scientific thinking forward? I found out that heavy things and light things fall the same, it is always too close to tell.

126 What did you actually observe? What are the important details that another scientist would need to know? What evidence do you have to support your thinking? Does what you have written agree with the data you recorded? What questions do you have now? What would you say to this student to move their scientific thinking forward? Heavy things fall faster than light things. I know this because when a leaf falls, it takes a long time to fall to the ground. A heavier object, like a rock, goes straight down and falls faster than a leaf.

127 What did you actually observe? What are the important details that another scientist would need to know? What evidence do you have to support your thinking? Does what you have written agree with the data you recorded? What questions do you have now? What would you say to this student to move their scientific thinking forward? I found out that heavy things do not fall faster than light things. I think this because every dropping race ended in a tie. For example, the marble and tennis ball both hit the ground at the same time. Also, the book and the penny hit the ground at the same time.

128 “The more time that elapses between a student response and teacher feedback, the less metacognitive reflection takes place.” ~Sonny Mangana and Robert Marzano

129 HOW TO PROVIDE TIMELY, ONGOING FEEDBACK IN THE REAL WORLD?

130 ANALYZE EXAMPLES OF STUDENT WORK Are fat and soap the same substance? For each of the following explanations, underline and label the claim, evidence, reasoning, and counter-argument. Which explanation is the strongest? Why?

131 ANALYZE EXAMPLES OF STUDENT WORK

132 Consider an idea regarding student feedback that you’d like to try in the near future. Make yourself a sticky note to remind yourself to do it.

133 FEEDBACK FOR TEACHERS USING FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT DATA TO INFORM INSTRUCTION

134 “Great teachers are habitual students of their students. They assess continually to understand the human beings that they teach.” ~Carol Ann Tomlinson

135 COLLABORATIVE ANALYSIS OF STUDENT WORK What kind of feedback does this provide for teachers? What can you learn from the experience even if your student’s work isn’t being analyzed?

136 USING FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT DATA TO INFORM INSTRUCTION Short term Long term

137 USING FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT DATA TO INFORM INSTRUCTION Short term Choose 3 “NEXT STEP” strategies that might work in your classroom.

138 USING FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT DATA TO INFORM INSTRUCTION Short term How might some of the ideas in our book be used as “NEXT STEP” strategies? Choose 3 ideas from the book that might work in your classroom.

139 USING FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT DATA TO INFORM INSTRUCTION Use formative assessment data to demonstrate student growth over time and thoughtfully plan instructional strategies to maximize that growth. Long term

140 IDENTIFY A GOAL

141 MEASURE STUDENT PROGRESS TOWARD GOAL

142 REFLECT ON STUDENT PROGRESS AND PLAN NEXT STEPS

143 Consider an idea regarding teacher feedback that you’d like to try in the near future. Make yourself a sticky note to remind yourself to do it.

144 “We must constantly remind ourselves that the ultimate purpose of education is to have students become self-evaluating. If students graduate from our school still dependent on others to tell them when they are adequate, good, or excellent, then we have missed the whole point of what education is all about.” ~Costa & Kallick

145 “It is through our assessment that we communicate most clearly to students which activities and learning outcomes we value.” ~NCTM Assessment Standards

146 REFLECTION With respect to formative assessment, I used to think…. …but now I think…

147 SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENTS: WHAT’S COMING?

148 DEVELOPING ASSESSMENTS FOR THE NGSS National Research Council Board on Testing and Assessment Board on Science Education Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

149 SOME OF THE MAIN MESSAGES New types of assessments are needed NGSS assessment should start with the needs of classroom teaching and learning States must create coherent systems of assessment to support both classroom learning and policy/ monitoring functions Implementation should be gradual, systematic, carefully prioritized, and attend to equity Professional development and adequate support for teachers will be critical

150 SYSTEM OF ASSESSMENT Assessment to support classroom teaching and learning Assessment for monitoring student learning Indicators of opportunity-to-learn (OTL)

151 WHAT MIGHT THESE ASSESSMENTS LOOK LIKE? Tasks should ask students to apply practices in the context of disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts. Science and Engineering Practices Crosscutting Concepts Disciplinary Core Ideas

152 WHAT MIGHT THESE ASSESSMENTS LOOK LIKE? Need multi-component tasks that use a variety of response formats: Selected response questions Short and extended constructed response questions Performance tasks Classroom discourse

153 SYSTEM OF ASSESSMENT Assessment to support classroom teaching and learning Assessment for monitoring student learning Indicators of opportunity-to-learn (OTL)

154 BIODIVERSITY IN THE SCHOOLYARD 5 TH GRADE EXAMPLE

155 5 TH GRADE EXAMPLE: BIODIVERSITY IN THE SCHOOLYARD Where are the three dimensions assessed in this series of classroom assessment tasks? Science and Engineering Practices Crosscutting Concepts Disciplinary Core Ideas

156 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT TASKS Collect data on the number of animals (abundance) and the number of different species (richness) in schoolyard zones Task 1 Create bar graphs that illustrate patterns in abundance and richness data from each of the schoolyard zones Task 2 Construct an explanation to support your answer to the question: Which zone of the schoolyard has the greatest biodiversity? Task 3

157 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT Collect data on the number of animals (abundance) and the number of different species (richness) in schoolyard zones Task 1

158 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT Create bar graphs that illustrate patterns in abundance and richness data from each of the schoolyard zones Task 2

159 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT Construct an explanation to support your answer to the question: Which zone of the schoolyard has the greatest biodiversity? Task 3 scaffold

160 SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT Construct an explanation to support an answer to the question: Which zone of the schoolyard has the greatest biodiversity?

161 5 TH GRADE EXAMPLE: BIODIVERSITY IN THE SCHOOLYARD Disciplinary Core Idea Biodiversity Crosscutting Concept Patterns Practices Planning and carrying out investigations Analyzing and interpreting data Constructing explanations Science and Engineering Practices Crosscutting Concepts Disciplinary Core Ideas

162 SYSTEM OF ASSESSMENT Assessment to support classroom teaching and learning Assessment for monitoring student learning Indicators of opportunity-to-learn (OTL)

163 PLATE TECTONICS MIDDLE SCHOOL EXAMPLE

164 MIDDLE SCHOOL EXAMPLE: PLATE TECTONICS Where are the three dimensions assessed in this performance task? Science and Engineering Practices Crosscutting Concepts Disciplinary Core Ideas

165 PERFORMANCE TASK Draw a model of a volcano formation at a hot spot using arrows to show movement in the model. Be sure to label all parts of the model. Use your model to explain what happens with the plate and what happens at the hot spot when a volcano forms. Draw a model to show the side view (cross-section) of volcano formation near a plate boundary (at a subduction zone or divergent boundary). Be sure to label all parts of your model. Use your model to explain what happens when a volcano forms near a plate boundary.

166 PERFORMANCE TASK The hot spot allows the magma to move up into the crust where it forms a volcano. The magma pushes up through the crust and goes up and erupts.

167 MIDDLE SCHOOL EXAMPLE: PLATE TECTONICS Disciplinary Core Idea Plate tectonics Crosscutting Concept Patterns Scale Practices Developing and using models Science and Engineering Practices Crosscutting Concepts Disciplinary Core Ideas

168 DEVELOPING ASSESSMENTS FOR THE NGSS Remember: This is a report about what kind of assessments need to be developed for NGSS. No one has developed these assessments yet. The examples included in the report (and today’s presentation) are things the committee saw and said…”Oh yes…something like that might work…”


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