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All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © How to collaborate with other Communities and Organizations.

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Presentation on theme: "All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © How to collaborate with other Communities and Organizations."— Presentation transcript:

1 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © How to collaborate with other Communities and Organizations

2 Isabelle Aubé Native Way Training Services Inc. Facebook.com/nativewaytrainingservices Presented by

3 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © In Partnership with

4 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Webinar Orientation Jennifer Pelletier with Jennifer Pelletier

5 A. Youth Fitness Guidelines B. Definition of Collaboration C. Collaboration Ideas & Models D. Risk Management & Benefits Today’s Goals

6 Delivery of information with some questions asked through polls. Evaluation after the information session. Open discussion and sharing with participants. Last poll questions evaluating exchange. Brief tour of the new Northern Links Website and all of it’s valuable resources. Format of session

7 Infants (aged less than 1 year) should be physically active several times daily – particularly through interactive floor-based play. The Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines recommends:

8 Toddlers (aged 1-2 years) and preschoolers (aged 3-4 years) should accumulate at least 180 minutes of physical activity at any intensity spread throughout the day, including: A variety of activities in different environments. Activities that develop movement skills. Progression toward at least 60 minutes of energetic play by 5 years of age. The Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines recommends:

9 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Canadian Sedentary Behavior Guidelines (0-4 years) For healthy growth and development, caregivers should minimize the time infants (aged less than 1 year), toddlers (aged 1-2 years) and preschoolers (aged 3-4 years) spend being sedentary during waking hours. This includes prolonged sitting or being restrained (e.g., stroller, high chair) for more than one hour at a time. For those under 2 years, screen time (e.g., TV, computer, electronic games) is not recommended. For children 2-4 years, screen time should be limited to under one hour per day; less is better.

10 Guidelines for Children (5-11 years) and Youth (12-17 years) For health benefits, children aged 5-11 years and youth aged years should accumulate at least 60 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity daily. This should include: Vigorous-intensity activities at least 3 days per week. Activities that strengthen muscle and bone at least 3 days per week. The Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines recommends:

11 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © For health benefits, children (aged 5-11 years) and youth (aged years) should minimize the time they spend being sedentary each day. This may be achieved by: Limit recreational screen time to no more than 2 hours per day ; lower levels are associated with additional health benefits. Limit sedentary (motorized) transport, extended sitting and time spent indoors throughout the day.

12 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. ©

13 “Many hands make light work”

14 1. The action of working with someone to produce or create something. 2. Something produced or created in this way. Synonyms: cooperation- contribution Defining Collaboration

15 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Working with other organizations or communities is not only a smart way to accomplish goals; it brings Aboriginal Communities back to the way things used to be pre-contact where every clan did their part in keeping community members healthy, fit and safe.

16 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Currently most organizations tend to be structured vertically. Decisions are made at the top and people derive their authority from their positions within the hierarchy.

17 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Leadership is centralized, the work is mission-driven, guided by procedures and statutes, and communication is mostly confined to members of the organization.

18 In contrast, collaborative groups, are structured horizontally. Leadership is broadly distributed. People derive their influence from having their ears to the ground, from being well- connected in the community, and from being engaged with many different groups and activities.

19 Decisions are guided by norms of trust and reciprocity, and communication is more personal, more conversational, more exploratory than in formal settings.

20 Collaborative efforts tend to be loosely structured, highly adaptive, and inherently creative.

21 By creating spaces where connections are made, ideas are built upon, and collective knowledge is developed, collaborative teams generate rich opportunities for innovation.

22 When the right people are brought together in constructive ways and with current information, they are able to create powerful visions and appropriate strategies for change.

23 By thinking, planning, and working together, the individuals and groups that make a community can accomplish goals that neither could achieve alone.

24 1.Recognizing opportunities for change; 2.Mobilizing people and resources to create changes; 3.Developing a vision of long-term change; 4.Seeking support and involvement from diverse and non-traditional partners; 5.Choosing an effective group structure; 6.Building trust among collaborators; and 7.Developing learning opportunities for partners. Steps to collaboration

25 Opportunities for change are created when community workers, organizations or policymakers initiate collaboration. Sometimes it’s a community member or a parent that initiates the change. Recognizing Opportunities for change

26 Others begin when a community becomes aware of an urgent need for change, or when funding becomes available to respond to conditions in the community.

27 Before initiating a collaboration you need to know…. mobilizing people and resources to create changes

28 Who might be willing to join your collaboration? Will the attitudes of the community, departments, the school leaders, and the governing bodies support the partnership? Are the potential partners willing to share their resources and capacities? We need to know

29 How do the interests of each potential partner fit into the broader collaboration? How can administrators of specific programs join with other partners in a unified effort? We need to know

30 You probably want a broad-based, inclusive partnership by creating a a cross- section of the community: parents, principals, teachers, counselors and other school staff, cultural leaders, health care and human service providers, business and political leaders, staff and administrators from community organizations.

31 Make sure your partners reflect diverse perspectives, experiences, and levels of authority to make sure every interest is represented.

32 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © It may take time for all of the partners to come on board, start with what you have and keep others in the know of what you are accomplishing. Sometimes it takes a bit of momentum to engage others to participate.

33 Collaboration focuses on identifying a common purpose and working toward joint decisions. This distinguishes it from other forms of cooperation that may involve shared interests but are not based on a collectively-articulated goal or vision. Developing a vision for long-term change

34 "We cannot even begin to agree on how we should act until we have a common definition of the problem," David Mathews writes in Politics for People “…one that reflects an understanding of our own interests, the interests of others, and how the two diverge and converge."

35 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © You can prepare something before meeting with the other collaborators to generate interest and have a baseline to start from. Invite their input afterward. This may save time and provide direction for the group Understand that what you start with may change drastically once everyone has a say.

36 Once you have your goals determined brainstorm on how you can get support to accomplish them. Don’t be afraid to think outside the box and seek support from local, provincial and national organizations, colleges, universities, the private sector, community members etc. Seeking support from diverse and non- traditional partners

37 Collaborative partnerships can be broadly grouped under two headings: Resolving conflicts, and Developing a shared vision for the future. In both cases, the process is aimed at carefully defining and, if need be, redefining the issues involved before moving on to solutions. Choosing an effective group structure

38 For collaboration to be effective, it must be democratic and inclusive. Hierarchies of any kind get in the way of sound decision-making, just as excluding some individuals or groups with a stake in the issue can derail the process.

39 Have a collaboration work group meeting about what you want to accomplish and how you want to accomplish it. Decide what system you want to change and how you will go about making the changes. Determine what results you want from working together.

40 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Determine your desired expected outcomes. What do you want to see changed as a result of your work?

41 Decide who is responsible for what work. Develop a work plan outlining the steps and person accountable. Have clear timelines and revisit them often.

42 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Desired results must be concrete, attainable, and measureable. How will you know when you have achieved your goal? What changes would satisfy you? What changes do you believe make your effort worthwhile?

43 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Document objectives and goals and revisit at each meeting.

44 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Desired results must be long-term and sustainable. What evidence will you see when your goal is reached?

45 Entering into collaboration also means you are entering into a relationship with other people and/or organizations. Some of the ways you can go about strengthening your relationship is to build trust. building trust among collaborators

46 To build trust, each collaborator will need to discuss their self-interest, what they want to get out of the collaboration and what will make the collaboration a success for all involved.

47 Trust is built by consistently delivering what you promised to deliver. It stems out of honesty and transparency.

48 Defining and clarifying roles within the collaboration and building a communication plan are also important elements to building the relationship between collaborators.

49 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Taking the time to create a conflict resolution strategy with steps to resolution can prevent many conflicts from arising or even minimize them quickly.

50 Coming together with people we don’t normally work with provides us with the chance to experience different work styles as well as to practice an open- mind. There are so many different ways to accomplish things it’s important to receive ideas as much as we give them. Developing learning opportunities

51 We can use these situations to learn skills we may not have developed and see things in a different way.

52 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © The challenge of putting collaboration into action raises many practical issues:

53 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Where will the partners meet to conduct business? Will one agency's facilities be used, or will meetings rotate among several facilities? Where will the partners meet to conduct business? Will one agency's facilities be used, or will meetings rotate among several facilities? Who will attend the meetings? What time(s) of the day or week are most convenient for them? Who will attend the meetings? What time(s) of the day or week are most convenient for them? Will child care be provided? Will child care be provided?

54 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © How often will the group meet? Will it meet for the same purpose every time? How long will meetings last? How often will the group meet? Will it meet for the same purpose every time? How long will meetings last? Who will determine the agenda for each meeting? How and when will partners submit agenda items? Who will determine the agenda for each meeting? How and when will partners submit agenda items? Will the position of chairperson rotate or remain stable? Will the position of chairperson rotate or remain stable? Who will distribute briefing materials to participants? Who will record and distribute meeting minutes? Who will distribute briefing materials to participants? Who will record and distribute meeting minutes?

55 Will responsibility be shared equally, or will one partner take the lead? How will decisions be made among partners? Establishing governing structures

56 Will tasks be delegated to subcommittees? If so, which ones? Who will staff subcommittees, and how will topics and members be selected? How can the meeting format best accommodate communication styles and preferences within the community? (For example, are informal meetings with refreshments best?)

57 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © The final step of the collaborative process, this is when: 1)Participating collaborators present the project to their communities/organizations; 2)Parties bring in the support of those who will be implementing the work; 3)The implementation is established; 4)And the project is monitored and the collaboration is effective.

58 Collaborative ventures obviously vary a great deal and not all of them can or want to follow this general framework.

59

60 Much will depend on the nature of the endeavor, the number of people or parties involved, the time- frame, and the resources at hand.

61 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © The key factors to ensure success are:

62 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Having a clear goal. Establishing a good communication and conflict resolution plan. Having a balanced decision making. Making sure everyone knows what is expected of them and what the timelines are.

63 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Monitoring progress and adjusting to the variables that will present themselves. Building and maintaining respect and trust between collaborators. Keeping things pleasant!

64 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Native Way Training Services wishes you best success in your endeavors.

65 All rights reserved Native Way Training Services Inc. © Next Webinar is April 9th at 1pm EST with Attawapiskat Elder Joanne Dallaire on “Improving our Workplace with Cultural Teachings”

66 Webinar Evaluation

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69 THANK YOU !.com/nativewaytrainingservices Join Us on Isabelle Aubé


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