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Sustainability: The role of mentors. My name is Shaun Webster. I am:  A parent  A grandparent  An International Project Worker at CHANGE  A person.

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Presentation on theme: "Sustainability: The role of mentors. My name is Shaun Webster. I am:  A parent  A grandparent  An International Project Worker at CHANGE  A person."— Presentation transcript:

1 Sustainability: The role of mentors

2 My name is Shaun Webster. I am:  A parent  A grandparent  An International Project Worker at CHANGE  A person with an intellectual disability  A role Model

3 CHANGE is a user led organisation. This means that the most of our Trustees are Disabled People.

4 People with intellectual disabilities at CHANGE: Run trainingMake information accessible Run campaigns

5 Why it is important for young people to have a role model? When children have lived in institutions they are always told what to do and have no power to think for themselves. Seeing an adult with an intellectual disability doing important work shows them that they can do the same thing with the right support. Having a role model helps young people have a voice and be more empowered to have control over their lives. If young people get the right SUPPORT they have greater CHOICE and become INCLUDED IN THEIR COMMUNITY.

6 What makes a good role model? Treat children with RESPECT – they are just as important as anyone else. Let them THINK for themselves – This will help them learn and build their confidence – it doesn’t matter if they don’t get things right the first time. LISTEN to what they have to say – You would be surprised how many good ideas young people have – You can learn from them too! SHARE your own experiences – show them they are not alone Treat them as an EQUAL – this will help build their confidence, and give them a STRONGER VOICE A good role model should change who has the POWER so that young people can be self- advocates and break down barriers.

7 Turning Words into Action The World Health Organisation and 53 countries signed a declaration called ‘Better Health Better Lives’ The declaration says it is important to listen to what children and young people need. Lumos worked with children in Bulgaria, Czech Republic and Serbia to make this happen. As a role model, I helped the children to support each other and speak up for themselves. The children talked about what really matters to them, such as education and equal rights and their dreams for the future. I trained them around better communication, being aware of things and listening to help them make things better for other children with intellectual disabilities.

8 Moldova – 2014 In 2014 I visited Moldova to work with children on public speaking skills and prepare two self-advocates to speak at a conference in London The children were very shy and quiet, by the end of the week they were completely different – I will tell you why soon! In Moldova they have INCLUSIVE EDUCATION schools, where children with an intellectual disability and one without are paired together to support each other as MENTORS. From supporting each other they become friends and both build their skills and confidence. Inclusive education is good because it BREAKS DOWN BARRIERS between children and that is good for the future. When children with disabilities mix with children without disabilities they don't see the disability anymore, they see a HUMAN BEING, and that is important for future generations and will make a big change in the future.

9 Being a role model in my own community I live in a flat as part of Keyring which is a housing organisation for people with mild and moderate intellectual disabilities to live independently in the community with support when they need it. I work as a role model for Keyring – quality checking their services across the UK. I talk to residents to see if they are happy with the support they get and use this to improve services. Having a role model with an intellectual disability helps them to open up. By taking time with people the results are worthwhile – we can support each other better than any professional!

10 Making a real difference The difference I have seen in the children I have worked with is amazing! At first they were shy, but slowly I watched them grow. They became confident and happier. They asked me questions about my experience. Now they are confident self-advocates and role models for young people across Europe. Our young people will shape the future – it is important that we give them the POWER and SUPPORT to do this.

11 Tel: (0044) Web: Facebook: Twitter: www. twitter.com/#!/changepeople_

12 Self-advocacy is important

13 “We need you to ask us what we want” “We need you to ask us what we want” “We are not second-class people, we are the same. We should have equal rights” “We are not second-class people, we are the same. We should have equal rights” “I can decide about my own life” “I can decide about my own life” “I can speak up for me and for my friends or other children with disabilities” “I can speak up for me and for my friends or other children with disabilities”

14 “Empower us if you want us to become stronger” “Empower us if you want us to become stronger” “Learn how to hear our voices” “Learn how to hear our voices” “Look at the world through children’s eyes” “Look at the world through children’s eyes” “Trust us – we can also make decisions” “Trust us – we can also make decisions”

15 Together we can: Move money from institutions to support families and communities Raise awareness of this particular form of harm services Develop and share the expertise to make change End institutionalisation in our lifetime

16 Join our global movement By 2050: No more children in institutions All children in families

17 Thank you


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