Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Western Adaptation Alliance Regional Leadership Academy Enhancing the Resilience of Sustainable Food Systems through Adaptive Water Management in the American.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Western Adaptation Alliance Regional Leadership Academy Enhancing the Resilience of Sustainable Food Systems through Adaptive Water Management in the American."— Presentation transcript:

1 Western Adaptation Alliance Regional Leadership Academy Enhancing the Resilience of Sustainable Food Systems through Adaptive Water Management in the American West May 5-7, 2014

2 Clinic: A Roadmap for City Food Sector Innovation and Investment Moderator: Steve Adams, ISC Presenter: Cynthia Pansing, Changing Tastes

3 Session Format An interactive session designed to help your team take stock of where you’ve been and where you are going.

4 About the Report An archived webinar providing a full overview of the report is available at

5 The Roadmap is… …a guidance document to help cities focus and develop investment strategies to increase the number of new innovations and ventures in their local food systems, and to better the odds of their survival and success.

6 Partners City/County of San Francisco (lead), cities of Minneapolis, Portland, Seattle and Vancouver Consultants Changing Tastes and Wallace Center at Winrock International Funded by the Urban Sustainability Directors Network from Surdna, Summit and JPB Foundations grants 6

7 Project Approach Literature Review and Team Input Asset Inventory/ Gap Analysis Tools and Strategies Impact and Screening Metrics Action Plan Framework Roadmap for Food System Innovation and Investment

8 How Innovation and Investment Benefit Cities and the Food System Strengthening the food system Strengthening metropolitan areas and enhancing resilience Investment in food system innovations in metropolitan areas Enhancing economic development Economic benefits Social benefits 8

9 Employment Growth by Industry: February 2010 – February 2012

10 Key Facts on Job Creation and Economic Benefits Large share of economy: 8.3% of total GDP in 2011 High job creation: food services created 30% of all new jobs in US in 2012, with each creating.45 to.78 additional jobs Small business creation: 91% of food businesses have fewer than 50 employees High risk: 60% of food related businesses fail within one year of launch. 90% fail within five years, 3% of new food grocery products remain in market after one year Factors like these together with the other findings from the Literature Review provide the business case for Investment in local food systems to help Elected Officials make investment decisions and compare food systems investments to other opportunities. 10

11 Characteristics of Food Sector Locally and Nationally High consumer demand: for local, sustainable and organic, increasing rapidly among retailers/consumers Most local supply near metro areas: 80% of small farms selling local food in/adjacent to Supply under strain: unpredictable weather events and potential supply disruptions Significant contributor to/risk from climate change: accounts for 10-17% of GHG Water management: local and regional constraining factor Risk: increasingly role of environmental factors Role of local governments: increasingly important role in strengthening/stabilizing food sector and innovation 11

12 Key Report Findings Increased and sustained demand for local food Shifts in local/sustainable food business ownership Uneven quality in wages for new food sector jobs Production and processing yield highest local multiplier effects with highest wages Investment risk is comparable to other sectors Continued research needed to gauge success of recent innovations and business models 12

13 Innovation Categories

14 Critical Success Factors for Local Policy and Financial Investments Systems approach Supportive policies and streamlined services such as procurement policies and incentives Supportive infrastructure (aggregation, processing, distribution) - *asset mapping Favorable political climate Infrastructure Strong relationships with suppliers Local branding Business/technical assistance Seed capital Healthy food marketing campaigns Community involvement 14

15 How Can Cities/Local Governments Spur Innovation/Investment in Food Sector? Technical assistance Direct public financing Land/water use policies Food safety regulations Straightforward and streamlined services

16 Examples of Local Government Support for Local Foods Planning and Investment Tax credits Streamlining permitting and/or making it flexible for food business operations Zoning/land/water use changes Vacant publicly-owned/managed building space, land, water and/or other resources Public land banks or conservancies Innovation clusters/zones through zoning, tax credits, CDBG, grants and private investment Procurement policies for local food purchase Marketing healthy local foods Private lender, investment capital Small food business training/technical assistance Large scale up potential of composting or recovery models 16

17 Step 1. Your assignment: Take 10 minutes with your team to discuss  To what extent does your city have a vision for investment and innovation in the food sector?

18 5 Steps to Food Sector Innovation Planning and Evaluation

19 Step 1: Visioning To create a vision for your city’s role in food sector investment, questions might include: What kind of future food system/sector do we want? How do we create it? What do success and/or progress look like?

20 Step 2. Mapping Assets and Gaps- Inventory of Food Related Assets City compiles an inventory and map of food related assets. Such assets include: –Human capital- capacities and skills of people.. –Social capital- rules, relationships, networks… –Financial capital – monetary resources –Physical capital - manufactured items and built infrastructure –Natural capital - naturally occurring, ecological resources

21 Asset Mapping and Assessment Business Training Food Start Up Incubators Food Sector Innovation Clusters Community Prep Kitchens Direct investment Tax incentives Connecting Angel Investors to Entrepreneurs Bank and loan officer education Food Hubs Infrastructure Food Policy Councils Procurement Policies Streamlined Permitting Urban Land Assembly Ag Land preservation Water 21

22 Step 2. Your assignment: Take 10 minutes with your team to discuss  To what extent does your city have an asset-gap inventory?  What are some of the assets that you have?  What are some of the key gaps?

23 Step 3. Assessing Options To support this step, the report includes: –Investment Evaluation Tool –Risk Management Tool These tools are available at:

24 Investment Evaluation Financial Return: What is the return on Public Investment? Financial Return: What is the return on Public Investment? Jobs: How many, how good and at what cost? Jobs: How many, how good and at what cost? Local Food System: Does the venture play a key role? Local Food System: Does the venture play a key role? Acceptable Risk? What are the odds this will go as planned? Acceptable Risk? What are the odds this will go as planned? Worthwhile? On balance, does this make sense for our city? Worthwhile? On balance, does this make sense for our city? Food Access: Will this increase access to healthy & sustainable food? Food Access: Will this increase access to healthy & sustainable food?

25 Sample Project to Evaluate: CityLights Urban Rooftop Greenhouse CityLights is a start up company that puts greenhouses on top of warehouses to grow fresh leafy greens, tomatoes, cucumbers and herbs. It needs $2M in startup funding. The city also would need to create a new zoning category to allow for this use. Within 3 years it expects to generate $3M in sales, $857K in payroll, and employ 30 people in two greenhouse operations, with average wages of $14/hour. The management team now works for a large grocer and has good experience. 25

26 Investment Evaluation and Risk Management Tools: City Lights Application Financial Return: What is the return on Public Investment? 283% Financial Return: What is the return on Public Investment? 283% Jobs: How many, how good and at what cost? 30 people - $14/hr avg $857K annual payroll Jobs: How many, how good and at what cost? 30 people - $14/hr avg $857K annual payroll Local Food System: Does the venture play a key role? Yes Local Food System: Does the venture play a key role? Yes Acceptable Risk? What are the odds this will go as planned? Acceptable Risk? What are the odds this will go as planned? Worthwhile? On balance, does this make sense for our city? Worthwhile? On balance, does this make sense for our city? Food Access: Will this increase access to healthy & sustainable food? Yes Food Access: Will this increase access to healthy & sustainable food? Yes 26

27 Investment Evaluation and Risk Management Tools: City Lights Application Financial Return: What is the return on Public Investment? 283% Financial Return: What is the return on Public Investment? 283% Jobs: How Many, How Good and at What Cost? 30 people - $14/hr avg $857K annual payroll Jobs: How Many, How Good and at What Cost? 30 people - $14/hr avg $857K annual payroll Local Food System: Does the venture play a key role? Yes Local Food System: Does the venture play a key role? Yes Acceptable Risk? What are the odds this will go as planned? Food Access: Will this increase access to healthy & sustainable food? Yes Food Access: Will this increase access to healthy & sustainable food? Yes 27 Worthwhile? On balance, does this make sense for our city? Worthwhile? On balance, does this make sense for our city? 15-17% chance of failure 235% adjusted ROI

28 Step 3. Your assignment: Take 10 minutes with your team to discuss  How does your city currently assess its options and choose which strategies to pursue?  How does this differ across city departments?

29 Step 4. Planning and Implementing

30 Step 4. Your assignment: Take 10 minutes with your team to discuss  What are some of the tools and strategies that your city is considering?  How do these relate to your assets?  How do these connect food, water and climate adaptation?

31 Step 5. Evaluation Clarify and prioritize what is important to city and why Balance what is needed for decisionmaking, monitoring and evaluating outcomes Select manageable number of indicators (<10) that align city’s vision, goals and desired outcomes Address social, economic and environmental sustainability  Examples: % of residents who are food secure, acres of city land used for food production, number of sustainable small businesses/jobs created, amount of energy or water conserved, etc.

32 Step 5. Your assignment: Take 10 minutes with your team to discuss  What, if any, metrics is your city tracking?  What baseline metrics would be helpful to have as you implement your strategy?

33 Clinic Wrap Up Report back/larger group discussion for minutes  What were key takeaways from group discussions?  What do they reveal about how to draw together development/implementation of food, water and climate adaptation plans/strategies?  Where are there gaps, barriers and opportunities?


Download ppt "Western Adaptation Alliance Regional Leadership Academy Enhancing the Resilience of Sustainable Food Systems through Adaptive Water Management in the American."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google