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B ELL W ORK Use a colored marker to write your first name on your nametag. Complete your Ticket In. Be sure to sign your name! Pass your ticket to the.

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Presentation on theme: "B ELL W ORK Use a colored marker to write your first name on your nametag. Complete your Ticket In. Be sure to sign your name! Pass your ticket to the."— Presentation transcript:

1 B ELL W ORK Use a colored marker to write your first name on your nametag. Complete your Ticket In. Be sure to sign your name! Pass your ticket to the front of the room. Note: Your “ticket” will be used to draw for seat prizes!

2 H OW D O Y OU E XPECT M E T O T EACH R EADING AND W RITING ? A Tool Box of Literacy Strategies for CTE Teachers 2

3 A GENDA FOR THE D AY 8:30 - 10:00 What is Literacy? 10:00 – 10:15 Break 10:15 – 11:45 Reading in CTE Classes 11:45 – 12:45 Lunch 12:44 – 2:00 Writing in CTE Classes 2:00 – 2:15 Break 2:15 – 3:30 Review, Closure, and Evaluation 3

4 F EEDBACK C ARDS I Got It!

5 C ONCEPT L ADDER (T EACHER H ANDBOOK, P AGE 4) Why are you here? What do you hope to learn? How will you use it? Where will you use it? When will you use it? I will consider this a worthwhile workshop if

6 TECHNIQUES D ECEMBER 2008 “A Vision for High Schools: Joining Academic and Technical Studies to Promote More Powerful Learning” “For the first time, federal law requires that CTE courses include essential academic skills.”

7 C ARL D. P ERKINS CTE A CT (T EACHER H ANDBOOK, PAGE 5) NC CTE Performance Indicators 1. By 2008-2009, 35.2% of CTE concentrators who left secondary education in the reporting year will have met the proficient or advanced level on the statewide high school reading/language arts NCLB assessment.

8 O BJECTIVES At the end of today’s workshop you will be able to: 1. Identify strategies that will help students become better readers and writers in CTE classes. 2. Prepare and model literacy strategies to use in your CTE classroom.

9 W HAT I S “L ITERACY ”? Webster defines “literate” as able to read or write; educated. Vicki Smith defined “literacy” as purposeful reading, writing, speaking, listening, or viewing.

10 W HAT IS P URPOSEFUL R EADING ?

11 W HY I S L ITERACY I MPORTANT I N C AREER AND T ECHNICAL E DUCATION ? To be literate in CTE classes, students must learn how to use language processes to explore and construct meaning with texts. When students put language to work for them in CTE classes, it helps them to discover, organize, retrieve, and elaborate on what they are learning.

12 W HOSE J OB I S I T ? To what extent must every CTE teacher be a reading teacher? Is literacy instruction just an “add-on” to the teaching of other skills and content? Are CTE teachers comfortable incorporating literacy skills into their curriculum? Are they prepared to do it? To what extent are they doing it already?

13 TECHNIQUES F EBRUARY 2009 “From No to Yes! A CTE Teacher’s Journey into Literacy Instruction” “I readily admit I thought literacy was the high school’s job. I already had enough to do. If I had to teach kids to read, then the high school needed to teach them how an engine works. Fair is fair, right?” Peter Gagnon

14 D O I R EALLY H AVE TO T EACH R EADING ? “I don’t know if teachers can work any harder than they’re already working, so we’ve got to find ways to make students carry more of the thinking load in our classrooms. As I walk out of school with my colleagues at the end of each day, we’re all tired. We’re carrying heavy bags of books and papers, and our shoulders are slumped. Meanwhile, our students bound past us to the parking lot, running and jumping down the steps two at a time, full of energy. I once heard someone say, “School should not be a place where young people go to watch old people work.” We’ve got to figure out how to work smarter, because what we’re being asked to do is really a challenge. Cris Tovani

15 T HE P ANTY H OSE T HEORY OF E DUCATION

16 CTE T EACHER T OOL B OX OF L ITERACY S TRATEGIES 16

17 B ELL W ORK T ICKET I N F AST W RITE On your “Ticket In”, jot down one reason you believe CTE teachers should incorporate literacy strategies into their lesson plans. _______________________________________________________________________ Reference: Bell Work: p. 29 Fast Write: p. 44 Ticket In: p. 71

18 C ONCEPT L ADDER (T EACHER H ANDBOOK, P AGE 4) Why are you here? What do you hope to learn? How will you use it? Where will you use it? When will you use it? I will consider this a worthwhile workshop if... ____________________________________________________ Reference: Anticipation Guide: p. 27 Concept Ladder: p. 38

19 R EADING B OOKMARKS __________________________________ Reference: Bookmarks: p. 31

20 A NALOGY S TATEMENTS Life is like _______________ because ___________________ _________________________________________________________ Reference: Analogy Statements: p. 26

21 T HE C HALLENGES OF R EADING AND W RITING IN THE CTE C LASSROOM ( P. 6-7) Activity 1: Tool: GIST (p. 52) Activity 2: Tool: Paraphrase (p. 61) Activity 3: Tool: Read-Pair-Share (p. 60) Activity 4: Tool: Write-Pair-Share (p. 60)

22 F OLDABLES P. 47-49

23 B REAK 23

24 T IME FOR S EAT P RIZES ! 24

25 R EADING IN CTE C LASSES A Tool Box of Literacy Strategies for CTE Teachers 25

26 R EADING IN CTE C LASSES : 3 I MPORTANT Q UESTIONS ( P. 8-9) 3-2-1 R ESPONSE 3. Why are some of our students struggling with reading? 2. Why can’t some of our students read? 1. Do the CTE textbooks contribute to the problem? ___________________________________________________ Reference: 3-2-1 Response: p. 72

27 T EXTBOOKS “Like it or not, textbooks are here to stay. Even as technology changes the nature of nonfiction reading into a multi- sensory, multi-text experience, the textbook—that single, hardbound, seemingly complete container of a year’s worth of content—remains a constant. Even if we choose to reject textbooks completely—cast them aside as biased, poorly written, or de-motivating—it turns out that we would be doing our students a disservice in preparing them for college, where the first-year student is asked to read, on average, 80 pages per class per week, with most of the load coming from textbooks.” Chris Tovani

28 R EADING IN CTE C LASSES : W HAT C AN W E D O ? (P. 10-11) Schools can... Teachers can... Students can... _____________________________________ Reference: Cornell Note Taking: p. 40

29 R EAD A LOUD Reading is easy! Comprehension is not! __________________________________________ Reference and Review: Read Aloud: p. 65

30 C ONTEXT C LUES Turn to page 13. Use “context clues” to read and understand “Di Tri Berrese”. _________________________________ Reference: Cloze Procedure: p. 34

31 T HUMB T HONGS 2 T HING

32 M ISS A DAMS

33 M RS. J ONES

34

35 T IME FOR S EAT P RIZES ! 35

36 BDA R EADING F RAMEWORK Before Reading Activity During Reading Activity After Reading Activity ______________________________________ Reference: BDA Reading Framework: p. 28

37 I W ONDER ? ? ? R EFERENCE : P. 54 My QuestionsAnswers or Interesting Facts

38 KWL K = What you know W = What you want to know L = What you learned ____________________________________ Reference: KWL: p. 56

39 S AY S OMETHING ! Encourages students to talk as a way to process course information. Research shows that student comprehension improves by 50% when they are asked to read or listen and purposefully talk about what they’ve read or heard. _______________________________________________ Reference: Say Something: p. 68

40 S AY S OMETHING : S AVE $ ON FOOD 1. Learn to Cook 2. Take Fewer Trips to the Grocery Store 3. Break Your Restaurant Routine 4. Bring Your Lunch to Work 5. Grocery Shop with Focus 6. Buy Generic 7. Make Your Own Latte 8. Use Coupons 9. Time Your Meal 10. Mind the Unit Price

41 T HINK A LOUD Explicit modeling in which teachers share with students the Cognitive process and thinking they go through as they read. ___________________________________________ Reference: Think Aloud: p. 70

42 R EAD AND R EPRESENT The student will read and represent what they have read by paraphrasing or representing with a picture, poem, or other medium. See list on page 66. ___________________________________________ Reference: Read and Represent: p. 66

43 G ALLERY W ALK Students look at the work of other students with an assigned task to complete as they “walk through the gallery”. ___________________________________________ Reference: Gallery Walk: p. 51

44 B REAK 44

45 T IME FOR S EAT P RIZES ! 45

46 W RITING IN CTE C LASSES : (L IST -G ROUP - LABEL P. 58) 3 T YPES OF W RITING FOR E VERY C LASSROOM ( P. 15) 1. Writing to learn 2. Writing to demonstrate learning 3. Authentic writing

47 W RITING IN CTE C LASSES : W HAT C AN T EACHERS D O ? ( M ARKING THE T EXT : PAGE 16) Read page 16. Mark the key words in the text using: Red pen Highlighter Sticky notes Page Markers ________________________________________________ Reference: Marking the Text: p. 59

48 A LPHABOXES : ( P. 22) ABCDEF GHIJKL MNOPQR STUVWXYZ

49 J OURNAL W RITING Prompt: Pick one strategy we have used this morning and describe how you might use it in your classroom. ____________________________________________ Reference: Journal Writing: p. 55

50 L EARNING L OGS Reflections: Which of the activities we have discussed this morning do you like most? Why? ___________________________________________ Reference: Learning Logs: p. 57

51 RAFT S : R = Role (What role will the student assume as writer? A = Audience (Choose an audience for writing.) F = Form (Format examples: Letters, Comic strip, Poem) T = Topic (Define topic, questions, points to be made) _____________________________________________________ Reference: RAFT: p. 64

52 M AD L IBS

53 G LOSSARY OF L ITERACY S TRATEGIES P. 18-21 53

54 S TRATEGIES R EVIEW 1. Alphaboxes: Closure and review 2. Analogy Statements: Life is like….. 3. Anticipation Guide: Dangling carrot 4. BDA Reading Framework: Not a Box 5. Bell Work: First activity 6. Bookmark: Identify key information 7. Cloze Procedure: Context Clues (3 Bears) 8. Concept Ladder: Introductory activity 9. Cornell Note-Taking: 3 Column note-taking 10. Fast Write: Why do we need to incorporate literacy?

55 S TRATEGIES R EVIEW 11. Foldables: Assortment 12. Gallery Walk: with Read and Represent activity 13. GIST: Reading challenges 14. Graphic Organizers: Assortment 15. I Wonder: Mistakes that Worked 16. Journal Writing: Identify favorite strategies 17. KWL: Teacher with Leukemia 18. Learning Logs: Identify favorite workshop activity 19. List-Group-Label: Writing in CTE Classes 20. Marking the Test: What can CTE Teachers Do?

56 S TRATEGIES R EVIEW 21. Pairs Read: Read, Pair, Share; Write, Pair, Share 22. Paraphrase: Challenges of reading 23. Popcorn Review: Pop up and share 24. RAFT: Role, Audience, Format, Topic 25. Read Aloud: Misspelled words 26. Read and Represent: Read and draw 27. Say Something: Ways to Save $ on Food 28. T-Chart: Not a Box 29. Think Aloud: Assortment 30. Tickets In and Out: Bell Work Activity and Evaluation 31. 3-2-1 Response: 3 questions on Reading in CTE Classes 32. Vocabulary Strategies: Recipe Cards

57 P OPCORN R EVIEW __________________________________________________ Reference: Popcorn Review: p. 62

58 P EBBLES OF G OLD

59 F ITTING L ITERACY S TRATEGIES INTO Y OUR CTE L ESSON P LANS (T EACHER H ANDBOOK, P AGE 76) Cooperative Learning Graphic Organizers Independent Practice Introducing New Material Note-Taking Reading Review and Closure Rules and Procedures Vocabulary Writing

60 S AMPLE L ESSON P LAN PAGES 77-78

61 L ESSON P LAN T EMPLATE PAGE 79

62 R ESOURCES Resources: page 81 For More Information: page 82 To download materials: www.northeast-cte.org Click on “Literacy Resources”

63 C LOSING T HOUGHT

64 E VALUATIONS


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