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Building a traditional qajaq: A Pecha Kucha presentation detailing a kayak building workshop held in Accord, NY in June, 2008. The slides are set to run.

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Presentation on theme: "Building a traditional qajaq: A Pecha Kucha presentation detailing a kayak building workshop held in Accord, NY in June, 2008. The slides are set to run."— Presentation transcript:

1 building a traditional qajaq: A Pecha Kucha presentation detailing a kayak building workshop held in Accord, NY in June, The slides are set to run at 20 seconds apiece. Wes Ostertag

2 me, circa 1993 Note the paddle (and spare), rudder, and high- volume kayak.

3 me, Note the paddle (and spare), lack of rudder, and low- volume kayak.

4 A Greenland-style kayak fits the paddler like a pair of pants. The first step in building a kayak is to make critical measurements related to the location of the pair of carved deck beams above the thighs, the carved deck beam above the shins and the location of the foot rest beam.

5 The host of the workshop, Martin, is assisted by the presenter of the workshop, Turner.

6 Wes and Phil, each working on shaping a pair of perfectly matched boards for the gunwales.

7 Plywood spreaders (in the middle) and clamps (at the ends) define the initial shape and gunwale angle. Deck beams are being installed.

8 Traditionally everything is held together by compression forces, wooden pegs and lashing – no nails, no screws. We used a bit of glue to help hold pegs in place.

9 All of the rear deck beams have been installed, one of the carved beams above the thighs is being installed.

10 All of the deck beams have been installed. Also two longitudinal stringers, traditionally used to support hunting gear on the front deck.

11 Hand bending an oak rib after it has been in the steam box.

12 The keelson is blocked up at each end providing the rough shape of the hull. Bent ribs are clamped in place and left to cool.

13 Six frames in various states of completion.

14 Lashing the stern stem piece to the gunwales. The keelson will be pegged to the stem piece.

15 The chines are clamped in place and then pegged to the ribs. The location and curve of the keelson and chines are critical to the performance of the kayak (will it hold a line well? will it be easy to turn? how will it react to wind and waves? will it be tender or stable?).

16 A nearly complete frame. The stem plate has been pegged to the gunwales and stem piece.

17 Bending the coaming hoop.

18 Sewing on the polyester skin (no seals in upstate NY).

19 Sewing the skin to the coaming. The skin holds the coaming to the kayak – the coaming is not attached to the wooden frame.

20 Painting the skin with tinted polyurethane.

21 Turner, Martin, Milton, Michael, Ed, Wes, Phil.

22


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