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T. S. Eliot (1888—1965) His aesthetic views: 1. A poem should be an organic thing in itself, a made object. Once it is finished, the poet will no longer.

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Presentation on theme: "T. S. Eliot (1888—1965) His aesthetic views: 1. A poem should be an organic thing in itself, a made object. Once it is finished, the poet will no longer."— Presentation transcript:

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2 T. S. Eliot (1888—1965)

3 His aesthetic views: 1. A poem should be an organic thing in itself, a made object. Once it is finished, the poet will no longer have control of it. It should be judged, analyzed by itself without the interference of the poet’s personal influence and intentional elements and other elements.

4 2. Modern life is chaotic, futile, fragmentary,so poetry should reflect this fragmentary nature of life and this kind nature of life should be projected, not analyzed.

5 3. objective correlative : a set of objects, a situation, a chain of events, formula in which the poet expresses his emotion and in which the fusion of intellect, feeling,and experience should be achieved.

6 4. The poet should draw upon tradition: use the past to serve the resent and future( the past, present, future interrelate), borrow from authors remote in time, alien in language, diverse in interest, use the past to underscore what is missing from the present.

7 His Techniques His Techniques 1. Use of disconnected images/symbols 2. Use of literary allusions/references 3. Use of highly expressive meter and rhythm of free verses 4. Use of metaphysical whimsical images/whims 5. Use of flexible tone

8 The Waste Land Comparison and Contrast: The Love Song of J.Alfred Prufrock and The Waste Land 1. themes: Song: love, impotence Land: lack of fertility, of love, lack of faith, failure of love and sex

9 2. techniques: fragmants, images accumulated, suggestions, allusions (fragments are organized by the myth of death and rebirth) 3. difference: Song: grey, listless, lack of vitality, life, energy Land: despair, more gloomy, bleaker; but death can also lead to rebirth

10 Two archetypes (stories) Two archetypes (stories) 1. Sir James George Frazer( ): The Golden Bough(12 vols)( ) primitive rituals which indicated similar patterns of behavior and belief among diverse and widely separated cultures: ritual king killing

11 Two archetypes 2. Miss Weston( ): From Ritual to Romance: Fisher King is impotent, to be healed by finding answers to the riddle and then the curse can be removed 3. Dante’s Divine Comedy 4. The Bible 5… 6…

12 Major motifs, images, symbols fertility(love, sex, vitality ) vs sterility(impotence) to be rejuvenated death vs rebirth death in life, rebirth in death, cycle of seasons: span of life wilderness, barren land, desert, rock, water(life, death, rebirth)

13 Major motifs, images, symbols quest for regeneration in a kaleidoscopic landscape of sexual disorder and spiritual desolation external barren landscape and internal barren landscape cause of this sterility of modern life: lack of belief god is buried, god is dead

14 Themes are expressed by 1. associations,allusions literary,biblical, historical, legendary, mythological 2. contrast: ironic parallels(April is …)teasing juxtapositions and hints of symbolism

15 Ambiguity of the poem egs water: life, death, rebirth; rock: sterility and hope Causes: 1. too many allusions, vague in origin 2. nature of life, of modern world, complexity of experience 3. symbols are not two-dimensional, thin, but rich in meaning; the poem was not meant to be a didactic allegory

16 Titles of five parts I The Burial of the Dead II A Game of Chess (two women, high and low, but both are frustrated and unhappy. Lil the low woman, her life is arbitrary and like a game of chess) III The Fire Sermon (the river past and present, also the scene of sordid love affairs) IV Death by Water V What the Thunder Said


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