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Cultural Resource Management Law Three Case Studies Broadlawns Medical Center Cell Tower, 2001 Carlisle, Iowa Cell Tower, 2001 James J. Hill House, 2003.

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Presentation on theme: "Cultural Resource Management Law Three Case Studies Broadlawns Medical Center Cell Tower, 2001 Carlisle, Iowa Cell Tower, 2001 James J. Hill House, 2003."— Presentation transcript:

1 Cultural Resource Management Law Three Case Studies Broadlawns Medical Center Cell Tower, 2001 Carlisle, Iowa Cell Tower, 2001 James J. Hill House, 2003

2 Purposes: To examine several of cases where CRM laws, especially Section 106, have applied To consider differing outcomes, dependent on conditions of each case

3 Carlisle, Iowa Cell Tower 2001

4 Carlisle, Iowa Cell Tower

5 Parmelee Lumber and Flour Mill 1843 An Early Iowa Industrial Center

6 Carlisle Brick and Tile, s

7 Carlisle Brick and Tile Works, 1950s

8 Overview of Carlisle Project Area Pre-construction

9 Getting Started: Phase 1

10 Using Heavy Equipment for Subsurface Testing

11 Results? A buried brick floor at the tower center-point

12 A Very Heavy-duty Auger

13 Auger at Work

14 The Cage

15 Ground Loop

16 Done!

17 Broadlawns Medical Center

18

19 Two Woodland Tradition Burial Mounds Damaged

20 Taking Down the Tower

21 The crane alone cost about $120,000!

22 What’s left to get rid of? Plenty!

23 Unfortunately, only one of the mounds

24 The Hospital, State Archaeologist, Iowa Indian Advisory Board, and the Cell Phone Company agree on what to do… …rebuild the mounds and restore the area. Howard Matalba Maria Pearson, Shirley Schermer, Steve Dasovich

25 The Process Selecting Clean Fill Strip off the ground cover

26 Cleaning up the site

27 Jackhammer away the top 3’ of the support

28 Figuring out the height of the mound

29 Bringing in Fill

30 Moundbuilding, 2001

31 Seeding and installing natural ground cover

32 Watching the grass grow

33 The Cost? About $1,500,000 $85,000 for landscaping $200,000 for ground work $120,000 for the crane $1,195,000 for two new towers

34 Digging on the Hillside Archaeology at the James J. Hill House, 2003 Archaeology Prepared by Larry J. Zimmerman

35 Image, Power, and (Crumbling) Architecture  Image & power  Gardens & glory  As the power fades  The irony of time: the archaeology of inequality  Homeless people and their “stuff”

36 The Project: Restoration of Hillside Retaining Walls and Fixing Drainage Problems  Drainage issues & damage  Big cistern upslope  Nothing lasts forever  Doing Archaeology before restoration  Why do archaeology?  Documenting construction methods  Documenting current condition of walls  Documenting material culture

37 Drainage Issues The problem starts at the cistern and ends up at the retaining walls downslope.

38 The Cause? The Big Cistern

39 Damage

40 Doing Hillside Archaeology  UM Practicum in Archaeology –Spring 2003 –15 students –Prof. Fred Cooper  Continued excavations through late July  Monitored construction until late November

41 Getting Some Background

42 Training Students  Documentation methods –Note taking –Photography  Mapping  Excavation techniques –Shovels, trowels, and screens

43 Why do archaeology? Archaeology can tell us what the received wisdom of oral tradition and documents can’t. Buried Walls & Structural Puzzles Greenhouse walls?

44 Artifacts from the Buried Wall A shovel blade and flower pot fragments give a clue about what the buried walls are from.

45 Documentary Clues 1903 Sanborn Insurance Map Cass Gilbert Greenhouse Specifications

46 Greenhouse Artifacts in Use Notice the tan and terra cots flowerpots in the lower left.

47 A sophisticated drainage and watering system The Hillside Cistern Complex

48 The Upper Garden Cistern

49 The Lower Garden Cistern

50 The Mushroom Cave

51 Wall Construction

52 Other Fun Artifacts 1900 S Barber Dime from a test unit near this spot Did it fall from a pocket?

53 Previously Unknown Structures

54 The Archaeology of Homelessness: The Paradoxes of Capitalism The gardens of the ‘Empire Builder of the Northwest’ became a decades-long sanctuary for the homeless who left behind their own material culture.


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