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Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Keys to creating a learner-centered interactive setting that inspires early language learners Interactive Mirrors classroom.

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Presentation on theme: "Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Keys to creating a learner-centered interactive setting that inspires early language learners Interactive Mirrors classroom."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Keys to creating a learner-centered interactive setting that inspires early language learners Interactive Mirrors classroom content M I B a s e d L i t e r a c y e n h a n c e d Family Buy-In MUSIC!!

3 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Standards and Modes  ACTFL 5C’s  NCATE  State guidelines Three modes of communication: *Interpretive*Interpersonal *Presentational

4 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 What does the elementary classroom generally look like? It is very important to know about the types of learning areas and somewhat standard ideas that are incorporated into the set-up of most early learning classrooms. Room Arrangement

5 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Learning Centers Taking your teaching to a more student directed model. a learning center is a small area within the classroom where students work alone or interact with others, using instructional materials to explore one or more subject areas. It is a place where a variety of activities introduce, reinforce, and/or extend learning, often without the assistance of the classroom teacher. Excerpted from Michael Opitz' book Learning Centers: Getting Them Started, Keeping them Going.

6 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Heterogeneous Grouping and Diverse Learners  Culturally and Linguistically  English Langauge Learners  Autism Spectrum  ADD or ADHD  Issues of fine motor skills  Physical or emotional disabilities  Economic challenges There are many more… scenarios

7 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=2113

8 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Read it, Write it, Speak it! Categorize it, Think about it! Color it, Draw it, See it! Act it, Touch it, Dance it, Sing it!

9 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010  Human beings possess at least eight types of mental functioning or intelligences.  Intelligences work together in concert depending on the problem to be solved.  Each intelligence has its own set of abilities and can guide an individual toward a learning style related to their abilities. http://www.ed.gov/dabase/ERIC_Digests/ed410226.html Gardner’s Theory

10 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Applying MI to an Early Language Learning Classroom  Verbal/Linguistic Intelligence is of great importance in any language classroom and most commonly used in instruction with stories and verbal discourse.

11 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Applying MI to an Early Language Learning Classroom Logical /Mathematical Intelligence can be very used in a language classroom with timelines, patterns and sequencing. Providing manipulative activities that require students to put ideas or even times of day in order.

12 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Applying MI to an Early Language Learning Classroom  Visual/Spatial Intelligence is extremely important in a language classroom as it presents ideas with non-verbal cues and allows students to express their own understanding and construct their own meanings.

13 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Applying MI to an Early Language Learning Classroom Musical/rhythmic intelligence is one of the two most essential intelligences to tap into when teaching young learners. Music and rhythm provide a developmentally appropriate base for building language skills.

14 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Applying MI to an Early Language Learning Classroom  Bodily/Kinesthetic intelligence is the other essential intelligence that can be employed in language instruction. Movement and tactile interaction help students construct more thorough understanding.

15 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Applying MI to an Early Language Learning Classroom Interpersonal intelligence plays a vital role in creating language learning that is conversational and meaningful for learners. Activities that require students to interact with each other will bolster their learning and allow for more linguistic risk- taking.

16 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Applying MI to an Early Language Learning Classroom Intrapersonal intelligence is one that is unspoken. Often a student’s silent period is actually a time when the child is reflecting and constructing individualized meaning. Metacognition grows learning potential and affords students the chance to build their own learning patterns.

17 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010  Naturalist intelligence Is a great way to incorporate science into the language classroom. By creating naturalist based activities, students will build interest in the natural world around us while learning in the target language.

18 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Content Based Instruction Is the learning and expansion of language skills through the medium of content and standards from the “core” educational subjects. In CBI, content is the instrument for language acquisition and language is a means of bolstering content knowledge.

19 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 What is the best way to preserve and grow the future of elementary language education? Content Based Instruction  Linked to core objectives  Focused on essential skills development  Functional linguistic goals  Exploratory, hands-on learning

20 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 GREAT NEWS!!! CONTENT IS FUN!!! LANGUAGE ARTS SCIENCE SOCIAL STUDIES MATHEMATICS

21 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 What to include????  You can’t teach all aspects of each content area in the short amount of time you have  You can’t expect students to learn all of the vocabulary YOU CAN help students learn some basic aspects of each!  YOU CAN collaborate with classroom teachers to choose topics and objectives from each content area that work well with your language objectives!

22 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 I am a language teacher…  Content standards are easily attainable in an elementary environment.  The same as linguistic goal of communication that requires students to ask questions and construct answers with a great twist…all hands- on and inspirational to many different kinds of learners.

23 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 How do I fit this into a 20 or 30 minute class?  Simple activities  Readily available materials  Resource sharing  Doesn’t all have to happen in one class  How can you not make the learning tied to what students are invested in for the rest of their day? BE VITAL!!!

24 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 KEYS FOR FOCUS… IMMERSION – Teach in the target language no matter what…limit English instruction MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES – hands-on, interactive learning leads to success INQUIRY - all activities and lessons should help students develop the skills necessary to ask questions and answer them COLLABORATION – Mirroring regular classroom instruction and working with your colleagues empowers teachers and learners

25 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 EXAMPLE Parts of the face and body Science Explorin g the 5 Senses Vocabulary Able to ask answer questions about where each part is Able to put parts in order INQUIRY PREDICTION CONSTRUCTIVIST INTERACTIVE Experiments Response Journals or pages Song Culminating Activity http://nclrc.org/arabick12/hayahttp://nclrc.org/arabick12/haya/

26 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 STEPS FOR CONTENT BASED CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT 1.Start with a brainstorm 2.Look for target language resources 3.Collaborate!!!! 4.Build activities, lessons, and assessment tools **Get yourself out of the 2-3 month unit mindset. Imagine snapshots of meaningful learning.

27 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Collaboration Collaboration with colleagues is at the heart of successful content based instruction and is extremely important to build program support.

28 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Early Literacy First Language Listening skills Phonemic awareness Concepts of print Oral/expressive language Second Language Hear the rhythm of the language Recognize sounds of the target language Directional cues Phrases and ideas that depict stories http://video.ecb.org/ecb/worldlanguageassessment/Assessing_Co mmunication_768K_Stream.wmvvideo.ecb.org/ecb/worldlanguageassessment/Assessing_Co mmunication_768K_Stream.wmv

29 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Balanced experience Pathways to true literacy should include a balance of experiences for children: READING READING READING To With By Excerpted from Primary Purposes –Reading, Fairfax County, Virginia, 1995.

30 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Emergent Readers (pre-kindergarten through first grade): http://www.bankstreet.edu/literacyguide/early4.html Feb. 16 Children at this stage benefit from:  seeing reading and writing modeled through listening to good stories and seeing others write meaningful messages  supported practice while reading engaging, predictable books with pictures that clearly relate to and illustrate the story line  encouragement to experiment with writing  experience with sorting words and pictures to build letter and sound recognition  experience with rhyming and other word play  activities that engage students in using oral and written language

31 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Early Readers (first grade through second grade):  know that reading needs to make sense  are more attentive to print and know more print conventions  use pictures, story patterns, context and memory of some words as well as some phonics to make sense of print http://www.bankstreet.edu/literacyguide/early4.html Feb. 16

32 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Children in this phase benefit from:  continued exposure to shared and guided reading of pattern stories and other predictable books, with clear print and pictures  games, activities to consolidate voice/print match and build sight word recognition  games and activities to build phonemic awareness  language experience activities  hearing, discussing, retelling a variety of stories read aloud http://www.bankstreet.edu/literacyguide/early4.html Feb. 16

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34 Identifying and Using Authentic Resources Art Music Realia Videos Web sites Literature The 5 minute resource hunt! Research, review, and share…

35 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Family and Community Buy-in Strategies and tools:  Electronic newsletter  Classroom webpage  Invite parents and others into classroom to share expertise or just visit  Do a special event or show to demonstrate learning  Conduct a special project  Participate in school wide or community wide events

36 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Music Essential to inspiring learners George Jellinek The history of a people is found in its songs. Billy Joel I think music in itself is healing. It's an explosive expression of humanity. It's something we are all touched by. No matter what culture we're from, everyone loves music. Agnes de Mile (1905-93) The truest expression of a people is in its dance and music. Plato I would teach the children music, physics and philosophy, but the most important is music, for in the patterns of the arts are the keys to all learning.

37 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Brain function and the affects of music on language  The information being studied activates the left brain while the music activates the right brain. Also, activities which engage both sides of the brain at the same time, such as playing an instrument or singing, causes the brain to be more capable of processing information.  Rhythm has been found to positively influence brain activity during learning; scientists have reported that after a rhythm sequence is stopped, brain activity occurs in anticipation.

38 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Questions???  What were your favorite children’s songs and rhymes?  What English children’s songs do you know?  Do you know any rhythm or hand games?

39 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Music: Music can lower stress, boost learning when used 3 different ways:  as a carrier - using melody or beat to encode content  as arousal - to calm down or energize,  as a primer - to prepare specific pathways for learning content) impacts the immune system, and is an energy source for the brain. (Wilson, 2005) http://www.uwsp.edu/Education/lwilson/newstuff/brain/overview%20on%20bb.htm

40 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Create your own song!

41 Amanda M.G. Seewald, M.Ed - 2010 Reflection  What is the benefit of thematic and content based learning for your students? What is the benefit for you as a teacher?  How can you best plan to incorporate different learning preferences and meet the needs of diverse learners?  Describe one new idea, strategy, or activity presented or developed today that you will use in your classroom.


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