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Mitigation Plan for Four New Jersey Counties Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment prepared for: Camden, Cumberland, Gloucester, and Salem Counties prepared.

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Presentation on theme: "Mitigation Plan for Four New Jersey Counties Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment prepared for: Camden, Cumberland, Gloucester, and Salem Counties prepared."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mitigation Plan for Four New Jersey Counties Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment prepared for: Camden, Cumberland, Gloucester, and Salem Counties prepared by: Stuart Wallace, LLC March 11-12, 2015

2 Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment Stuart Wallace, CFM  Since 1980:  Landscape Architect  Civil Engineer  Comprehensive Land Use Planner (AICP)  Since 1999:  Emergency Management Planning & Training Consultant  Certified Floodplain Manager (CFM)  Since 2014:  Stuart Wallace, LLC 2

3 Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment Stuart Wallace, CFM  Consultant Lead for FEMA HMP guidance & training  Coordinated reviews of 100’s of HMPs for FEMA Regions  Managed projects resulting in dozens of approved HMPs 3

4  Clarify contents of NJ4 HMP  Provide support for implementing risk reduction measures Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment Workshop Purpose 4

5  HIRA, as required by DMA 2000, provides valuable information for HMP implementation: Public outreach and education Public outreach and education Setting priorities Setting priorities Documenting benefits for grant applications Documenting benefits for grant applications  HIRA value depends on acquiring, compiling, and accessing new and changing information about risk Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment Workshop Context 5

6  Definitions  DMA 2000 HIRA Requirements  NJ4 HMP HIRA Results  HIRA Uses  HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access  Resources What are your expectations for this session? Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment Discussion Topics Outline 6

7 Definitions Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment 7

8 Definitions Risk Source: FEMA Local Mitigation Planning Handbook 8

9 Definitions Natural vs. Man-made Hazards  Natural Hazards versus Man-made (or Human- caused) Hazards DMA 2000 specifically refers to “natural” hazards DMA 2000 specifically refers to “natural” hazards Certain man-made hazards can be treated like natural hazards (e.g., dam or levee failure, accidental hazardous materials releases) Certain man-made hazards can be treated like natural hazards (e.g., dam or levee failure, accidental hazardous materials releases) Intentional acts (e.g., cyber disruption, IEDs, etc.) require fundamentally different methods to assess risk Intentional acts (e.g., cyber disruption, IEDs, etc.) require fundamentally different methods to assess risk 9

10 Definitions Other Hazard Distinctions  Geospecific versus Non-geospecific Hazards Geospecific hazards like dam failures and floods occur in predictable locations Geospecific hazards like dam failures and floods occur in predictable locations Non-geospecific hazards like earthquakes, high wind events, and winter storms can cause building failures across broad regions but have predictable magnitudes Non-geospecific hazards like earthquakes, high wind events, and winter storms can cause building failures across broad regions but have predictable magnitudes 10

11 Definitions Other Hazard Distinctions  Mitigation versus Response & Recovery Hazards like floods can potentially be mitigated Hazards like floods can potentially be mitigated Hazards like aircraft crashes can be prepared for but generally not mitigated Hazards like aircraft crashes can be prepared for but generally not mitigated 11

12 Definitions Risk Assessment Steps  Hazard Identification – natural hazards your community is susceptible to  Hazard Profiles – what hazards can do to physical, social, and economic assets  Vulnerability Assessment – determining how assets are exposed/vulnerable to damage  Loss Estimation – the cost of damages or potential losses avoided Note: terminology and process descriptions vary ! 12

13 DMA 2000 HIRA Requirements Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment 13

14 DMA 2000 HIRA Requirements DMA 2000 Chronology  Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (DMA 2000) Public Law , signed October 10, 2000, amended the Stafford Act of 1988 (i.e., statutory authority for most Federal disaster response activities, especially for FEMA) Public Law , signed October 10, 2000, amended the Stafford Act of 1988 (i.e., statutory authority for most Federal disaster response activities, especially for FEMA) Section 322 included requirement for hazard mitigation planning at state and local levels Section 322 included requirement for hazard mitigation planning at state and local levels  FEMA produced Interim Final Rule (IFR) in 2002 including §201.6 identifying required HMP content 14

15 DMA 2000 HIRA Requirements DMA 2000 Overview  HMPs must be … prepared in a manner consistent with DMA 2000 requirements (per IFR §201.6) prepared in a manner consistent with DMA 2000 requirements (per IFR §201.6) adopted by each individual jurisdiction adopted by each individual jurisdiction approved by SHMOs and FEMA Regions approved by SHMOs and FEMA Regions … to preserve eligibility for FEMA Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) federal grants  HMPs must be updated every five years (local and multijurisdictional) and again adopted and approved 15

16 DMA 2000 HIRA Requirements IFR HIRA Requirements  Interim Final Rule Requirement §201.6(c) Plan content: The plan shall include the following: (2)A risk assessment that provides the factual basis for activities proposed in the strategy to reduce losses from identified hazards. Local risk assessments must provide sufficient information to enable the jurisdiction to identify and prioritize appropriate mitigation actions to reduce losses from identified hazards. 16

17 DMA 2000 HIRA Requirements IFR HIRA Requirements  IFR Requirement §201.6(c)(2) (cont’d): The risk assessment shall include: (i)A description of the type, location, and extent of all natural hazards that can affect the jurisdiction. The plan shall include information on previous occurrences of hazard events and on the probability of future hazard events. 17

18 DMA 2000 HIRA Requirements IFR HIRA Requirements  IFR Requirement §201.6(c)(2) (cont’d): The risk assessment shall include: (ii)A description of the jurisdiction's vulnerability to the hazards described in paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section. This description shall include an overall summary of each hazard and its impact on the community. All plans approved after October 1, 2008 must address NFIP insured structures that have been repetitively damaged by floods. 18

19 DMA 2000 HIRA Requirements IFR HIRA Requirements  IFR Requirement §201.6(c)(2)(ii) (cont’d): The plan should describe vulnerability in terms of: (A)The types and numbers of existing and future buildings, infrastructure, and critical facilities located in the identified hazard areas; (B)An estimate of the potential dollar losses to vulnerable structures identified in paragraph (c)(2)(ii)(A) of this section and a description of the methodology used to prepare the estimate; 19

20 DMA 2000 HIRA Requirements IFR HIRA Requirements  IFR Requirement §201.6(c)(2)(ii) (cont’d): The plan should describe vulnerability in terms of: (C)Providing a general description of land uses and development trends within the community so that mitigation options can be considered in future land use decisions. 20

21 DMA 2000 HIRA Requirements IFR HIRA Requirements  IFR Requirement §201.6(c)(2) (cont’d): The risk assessment shall include: (iii)For multi-jurisdictional plans, the risk assessment section must assess each jurisdiction's risks where they vary from the risks facing the entire planning area. 21

22 DMA 2000 HIRA Requirements IFR HIRA Requirements The IFR intentionally uses the words “shall” and “should” for specific elements. Where results are dependent on data that may or may not readily exist, the IFR purposefully uses the word “should” to acknowledge the potential difficulty in meeting these quantitative requirements. 22

23 DMA 2000 HIRA Requirements Other Specific Requirements  FEMA Region II Conditions of Approval reiterates basic requirements such as “include and use the most current and readily available” data… …but also emphasizes the need to clearly relate the “risks from natural hazards to each jurisdiction”. 23

24 DMA 2000 HIRA Requirements Expectations Original expectations for HIRAs in HMP and HMP updates assumed available data for all hazards (i.e., besides flooding) would be continuously improved through on-going plan maintenance. This expectation has not been met for a variety of good and bad reasons. How does a lack of detailed hazard data limit the effectiveness of HMPs? 24

25 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment 25

26 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Geospecific Hazards Six of the 12 NJ4 HMP natural hazards occur in predictable locations:  Coastal Erosion and Sea Level Rise  Dam Failure  Levee Failure  Flood  Geologic Hazards (landslides, sinkholes)  Wildfire 26

27 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Coastal Erosion and Sea Level Rise FEMA Risk MAP data used to show parcels and critical facilities potentially vulnerable to inundation if rising sea levels increase Base Flood Elevations (BFE’s) by +1, +2, and +3 feet 27

28 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Dam & Levee Failure  Inundation zones from NJDEP high hazard dam EAPs used to show vulnerable parcels and critical facilities  USDA levee inventory locations used to identify vulnerable parcels and critical facilities 28

29 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Flood FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMS) (*) used to show parcels and critical facilities within designated flood zones (*) Effective FIRMS used for assessment and Preliminary FIRMS was also included for coastal communities 29

30 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Wildfire USDA and NJ Fire Service data used to show parcels and critical facilities in areas with high fuel potential and close proximity to development 30

31 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Non-Geospecific Hazards The other six NJ4 HMP natural hazards occur across the entire region but can be assessed based on potential impacts:  Drought  Extreme Temperature  Earthquake  High Wind  Severe Weather - Summer  Severe Weather - Winter 31

32 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Drought & Extreme Temperature  NJDEP data regarding percent of agricultural land use was used to determine relative risk to drought  Extreme temperature assessment considered age and income distributions to acknowledge at-risk individuals 32

33 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Earthquake US Census data was used to identify population density and the age of building stock to indicate areas with potentially higher risk 33

34 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results High Wind US Census data and design wind speed zones (per the ASCE) were used to identify age of building stock and anticipated wind forces to indicate areas with potentially higher risk 34

35 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Severe Weather - Summer NJDEP data regarding percent of agricultural land use and US Census data on age of building stock were combined to identify areas with potentially higher relative risk from hail or lightning 35

36 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Severe Weather - Winter NJ State Climatologist historical snow depth data and US Census data on age of building stock were combined to identify areas with potentially higher relative risk of damage to structures from heavy snow loads 36

37 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Relative Risk Assessment The HIRA process for the twelve natural hazards resulted in an “objective” risk assessment with high, medium, low, or “N/A” designations Example shown is for Coastal Erosion and Sea Level Rise 37

38 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Relative Risk Assessment The Municipal Working Group Work Sessions included “subjective” risk assessment results based on the experience and expertise of the group Example shown is for Coastal Erosion and Sea Level Rise 38

39 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Relative Risk Assessment Objective 39 Subjective

40 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Relative Risk Assessment The objective results for all twelve natural hazards were also combined to provide one simple result regarding overall relative risk in the NJ4 HMP Region 40

41 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Critical Facility Hazard Exposure Critical facilities for each municipality were inventoried and mapped using GIS and manual processes Example shown is for Salem County municipal critical facility locations Note: See separate Workshop Session re: CF Hazard Exposure Assessment 41

42 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Critical Facility Hazard Exposure CF locations were compared with geospecific hazard zones for each jurisdiction. Results formed the basis for follow-up site and facility evaluations. What value could these inventories have beyond mitigation? 42

43 Data limitations are common in four main areas:  Damage histories  Data availability / changes  Asset locations  Asset attributes NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Data Limitations – Overview 43

44  To produce detailed HIRA results with associated dollar value loss estimates, site and facility damage histories are needed including:  Direct damages to assets  Loss of service  Cost of response, restoration, and recovery  Other than NFIP flood insurance claims, this information is not usually acquired, compiled, or accessible NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Damage Histories 44

45  Information is not always available when plans are developed or updated. For example, Risk MAP results for increased inundation zones were only available for Cumberland and Salem counties. The same information for Camden and Gloucester Counties should be incorporated into HIRA when available from FEMA.  Information used in the HIRA may change within a five-year update period. For example, sea level rise estimates can change as better information and predictive techniques are developed. NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Data Availability / Changes 45

46  For geospecific hazards, lack of building footprint data requires using less accurate parcel or census block data to determine relative risk within different hazard zones (floodplains, storm surge categories, wildfire fuel, etc.)  Initial critical facilities data was inaccurate and did not include GPS (x,y) coordinates. As part of the NJ4 HMP HIRA, nearly 1,000 critical facilities were geocoded and then manually edited to position coordinates to exact locations. NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Asset Locations 46

47 Even when building footprint data is available there may be limited attribute data. The NJ4 HMP HIRA could be improved significantly with the following asset attribute data:  Structure type  Building replacement value  Building contents value  Age and condition of the structure  Square footage  First floor elevations (to compare with BFEs)  Damage history NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Asset Attributes 47

48 The Draft Regional Hazard Mitigation Plan – including Section 3: HIRA – can be viewed and downloaded at regional-hazard- mitigation-plan/ regional-hazard- mitigation-plan/ regional-hazard- mitigation-plan/ What value do these assessments have for your municipality? NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Regional Hazard Mitigation Plan 48

49 HIRA Uses Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment 49

50 NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Public Outreach and Education Mitigation Measure #1 refers to outreach and education including providing information about current hazards and risk to property owners For example, information about the potential for increased inundation would be useful for property owners to understand future risk implications 50

51 HIRA Uses Setting Priorities HMP monitoring, evaluation, and updates require periodically identifying and confirming priorities which can be based on HIRA information 51

52 HIRA Uses HMP Updates HIRA-related issues that would prompt / support HMP Updates include:  Has a natural disaster occurred?  Should the list of hazards be modified?  Are there new hazard data sources or revisions to existing data?  Has new development occurred that could be at risk?  Has the status of repetitively flooded properties changed? 52

53 HIRA Uses Documenting Potential Benefits  Most federal and state hazard mitigation grant programs require a comparison of potential benefits to costs  “Costs” are the total of preparation and construction costs for a proposed mitigation measure  “Benefits” are the potential losses avoided by implementing a mitigation measure. The determination of losses avoided is most easily accomplished by looking at what has already happened (damage histories”). 53

54 HIRA Uses Documenting Losses Avoided  For future reference and refinement of HIRA results, it is important to document losses avoided after a mitigation measure is in place  Similar to potential benefits, documenting losses avoided is based on past histories of damages for the asset that has been mitigated Which (if any) of these uses meets your needs? 54

55 HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment 55

56 HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Issues / Categories Issues: What – types of data What – types of data How – options for acquiring information How – options for acquiring informationCategories: NJ4 HMP HIRA Results NJ4 HMP HIRA Results Assets Assets Hazard Events / Problem Areas Hazard Events / Problem Areas Changing Conditions Changing Conditions 56

57 HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access NJ4 HMP HIRA Results What?  For public outreach and education, determining priorities, supporting funding options, and updating HMPs Hazard Histories Hazard Histories Hazard Extent and Magnitude Hazard Extent and Magnitude Loss Estimates Loss Estimates 57

58 HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access NJ4 HMP HIRA Results How?  NJ4 HMP Regional Hazard Mitigation Plan Section 3: HIRA - Project mitigation-plan/ mitigation-plan/ mitigation-plan/  GIS and mapping – Municipal and/or County planning / GIS staff (to be determined) 58

59 HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Assets What?  Asset locations – to compare with known hazards  Asset attributes – relative to identified hazards and as needed to maintain critical and essential functions Structure Structure Equipment Equipment Site Site Access Access 59

60 HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Assets How?  Asset locations GPS / smartphones, handheld units GPS / smartphones, handheld units Street addresses / Geocoding software and websites (search: “find latitude and longitude”) Street addresses / Geocoding software and websites (search: “find latitude and longitude”)  Asset attributes Record documents (building permits / CDs) Record documents (building permits / CDs) Existing periodic inspections Existing periodic inspections Site and Facility Assessments – See Critical Facility Workshop and Webinars Site and Facility Assessments – See Critical Facility Workshop and Webinars 60

61 HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Hazard Events What?  Hazard Events – to improve documentation for funding options and plan updates Frequency Frequency Extent / Magnitude Extent / Magnitude 61

62 HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Hazard Events How?  Available information after hazard events Personal and organizational logs Personal and organizational logs Local weather stations Local weather stations Weather reports and records per NWS / NOAA Weather reports and records per NWS / NOAA Preliminary Damage Assessments (PDAs) / Project Worksheets (PWs) Preliminary Damage Assessments (PDAs) / Project Worksheets (PWs) Disaster declarations Disaster declarations 62

63 HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Problem Areas What?  Problem Areas – to improve documentation for funding options and coordination of operations Repetitive property flooding Repetitive property flooding Drainage Drainage Coordinated dam releases Coordinated dam releases 63

64 How?  Available information before, during, after events:  NFIP Flood Insurance claims  Damages for uninsured properties  See NFIP / Repetitive and Severe Repetitive Loss Properties Workshop and Webinars HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Repetitive Property Flooding 64

65 How?  Available information before, during, after events:  Is problem area located on an emergency evacuation route?  Number of one-way traffic trips per day (preferably documented by a professional engineer, planner, or county official)  Direct physical damages caused by each event (for both Presidential Disaster Declarations and non-declared events) HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Drainage Problems 65

66 How?  Available information (continued):  Direct and indirect costs of response and recover  Length of time roadways were closed  Number of homes cut off by road closure (number of structures and population)  Additional time delays and/or additional travel miles due to detours (if detours are available)  Source of flooding and photographs HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Drainage Problems (continued) 66

67 How?  Available information re: dams before events:  Dams located on common streams and drainage ways  Ownership  Dam configurations HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Coordinated Dam Releases 67

68 How?  Available information re: dams before events:  Holding capacity and depth / volume relationships  Capacity and flow characteristics of streams and drainage ways between dams  Downstream obstructions (levees, tidal waterways, etc.) HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Coordinated Dam Releases 68

69 HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Changing Conditions What?  Regulatory – requirements that affect HIRA results and priorities Flood zones Flood zones Dam classifications Dam classifications  Available Data – information that is subject to change over time Development patterns Development patterns Sea level rise Sea level rise 69

70 How?  Available information for NJ4 HMP jurisdictions via the FEMA Flood Map Service  Flood Insurance Studies  Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs)  Letters of Map Change (LOMC)  GIS databases HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Flood Zones 70

71 How?  Available information (eventually) for NJ4 HMP jurisdictions via FEMA Region II’s Coastal Analysis and  Flood Risk Map  Flood Risk Database (including “Changes since Last FIRM”, “Areas of Mitigation Interest”, “Flood Depth and Analysis Grids”, “Flood Risk Assessment Data”) HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Flood Zones 71

72 How?  On-going revisions to FIRMs in the coastal communities in NJ4 HMP will culminate (in the near future) in adoption of new Effective FIRMs  See NFIP / Repetitive and Severe Repetitive Loss Properties Workshop and Webinars  See FEMA Flood Risk Open Houses  Camden County on March 25th  Gloucester County on March 26 th HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Flood Zones 72

73 How?  The NJ4 HMP dam failure risk assessment included evaluating the risk to high hazard dams. A change in classification may impact which dams are evaluated in future plan updates  There is no set criteria for requesting a change to the high, significant, and low hazard classifications HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Dam Classifications 73

74 How?  Request for hazard classification can be initiated by the NJDEP – Dam Safety possibly as part of a dam rehabilitation project or from the dam owner’s engineer  Depending on the risk downstream of the dam, acceptable documentation to justify a change in classification can range from a few photographs and structure elevations to an H & H study HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Dam Classifications 74

75 How?  Available information includes: Development approvals Development approvals Building permits Building permits Aerial photogrammetry Aerial photogrammetry HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Development Patterns 75

76  Available information for Sea Level Rise:  National Climate Assessment  Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Changehttp://www.ipcc.ch/  NOAA Tidal Gauges  NOAA Digital Coast  USGS Sea Level Rise  Surging Seas  Rutgers NJ Flood Mapper  Jacques Cousteau NERRhttp://jcnerr.org/  HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Sea Level Rise 76

77  How do we access this information?  Use tools as-is on websites  Contact project manager and explain your needs.  How do we use this information?  1. Understand your situation Life span of program/ buildingLife span of program/ building Parameters: Cost, Policies, Community Restrictions, etc.Parameters: Cost, Policies, Community Restrictions, etc.  2. Identify future changes Current hazards and vulnerabilitiesCurrent hazards and vulnerabilities Relation to projectionsRelation to projections  3. Update planning to include future changes HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Sea Level Rise 77

78  1. Monitor NOW using NOAA’s tidal gauges  2. Predict FUTURE using National Climate Assessment projections for global sea level rise  3. Understand LOCAL RISK using Surging Seas HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Sea Level Rise 78

79 HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Shared Responsibilities  Preceding identifies basic issues related to: What? What? How? How?  Still need to identify: Who? Who? When? When? 79

80 HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Shared Responsibilities  Acquisition - Best accomplished by the end user, i.e., municipalities  Compilation and Access – Options include: Individual municipalities with GIS / IT capabilities Individual municipalities with GIS / IT capabilities Groups of municipalities with common issues (e.g., dam coordination efforts) Groups of municipalities with common issues (e.g., dam coordination efforts) County and regional partners County and regional partners State agencies and organizations State agencies and organizations 80

81 HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Shared Responsibilities  Who do you think can help with each of these key steps: Property Owners Property Owners Municipalities Municipalities Counties Counties State State  Who can be and/or should be “in charge”? 81

82 HIRA Data Acquisition, Compilation, and Access Other Considerations  Reduce redundant and inconsistent hazard assessments for HMPs, EOPs, recovery plans, master plans, flood and stormwater management plans and ordinances, et al: Expand NJ4 HMP HIRA to include manmade and technological hazards and identify impacts and consequences Expand NJ4 HMP HIRA to include manmade and technological hazards and identify impacts and consequences Maintain resulting assessment annually coordinated with updated information available from county, state, and federal sources Maintain resulting assessment annually coordinated with updated information available from county, state, and federal sources Cross reference assessment into all documents during periodic updates Cross reference assessment into all documents during periodic updates 82

83 Resources Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment 83

84 Resources Available Guidance  FEMA State and Local Mitigation Planning “how-to” Guides Volume 2 (Publication 386-2) Volume 2 (Publication 386-2) Worksheets 1, 2, 3a, 3b, & 4 Worksheets 1, 2, 3a, 3b, & 4 84

85 Resources Available Guidance  FEMA Local Mitigation Planning Handbook Task 5 Task 5 85

86 Resources Available Training Programs  FEMA’s Emergency Management Institute E-176 – HAZUS MH for Floodplain Managers E-176 – HAZUS MH for Floodplain Managers E Application of HAZUS-MH for Risk Assessment E Application of HAZUS-MH for Risk Assessment E-299 – Risk MAP Process and Tools E-299 – Risk MAP Process and Tools et al et al 86

87 Resources Technical Resources  In-House Planning, GIS, architecture, engineering, public works, permitting & inspections Planning, GIS, architecture, engineering, public works, permitting & inspections  Partners State agencies including NJOEM re: DMA 2000 requirements & grant programs; NJDEP re: NFIP, floodplain management, & flood mapping State agencies including NJOEM re: DMA 2000 requirements & grant programs; NJDEP re: NFIP, floodplain management, & flood mapping Regional planning, non-profit organizations, and academia for risk analysis expertise Regional planning, non-profit organizations, and academia for risk analysis expertise 87

88 Resources Technical Resources  Consultants Specialists in FEMA program-related risk assessment techniques and requirements (e.g., HAZUS-MH, Risk MAP, benefit-cost analysis) Specialists in FEMA program-related risk assessment techniques and requirements (e.g., HAZUS-MH, Risk MAP, benefit-cost analysis) 88

89 Resources Technical Resources  What technical resources are currently used by your community? In-house In-house Partners Partners Consultants Consultants  What other resources are available in your community? 89

90 Questions? Stuart Wallace, CFM Stuart Wallace, LLC


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