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TEACHING, LEARNING, AND THE 84 TH LEGISLATURE A Presentation to Region 11 ESC Instructional Leaders by Curtis Culwell, Ed.D. and Lynn M. Moak December.

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Presentation on theme: "TEACHING, LEARNING, AND THE 84 TH LEGISLATURE A Presentation to Region 11 ESC Instructional Leaders by Curtis Culwell, Ed.D. and Lynn M. Moak December."— Presentation transcript:

1 TEACHING, LEARNING, AND THE 84 TH LEGISLATURE A Presentation to Region 11 ESC Instructional Leaders by Curtis Culwell, Ed.D. and Lynn M. Moak December 4, 2014

2 OVERVIEW Social / political contexts: election outcomes Major issues and relevant pre-filed legislation Current performance Policies and pressure points Outlook for end of session 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 2

3 NOVEMBER ELECTION Many new faces in government next year:  Governor – Greg Abbott  Lt. Governor – Dan Patrick  Attorney General – Ken Paxton  Comptroller – Glenn Hagar  Agriculture Commissioner – Sid Miller  Chief Justice of Supreme Court – Nathan Hecht  25 New House Members (38 more only in second term)  7 New Senators (3 previously in House; 5 more only in second session)  Additional special elections coming  Commissioner of Education – ? 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates

4 PARTY LINES House: 98 Republicans, 52 Democrats One-third of House members are in 1 st or 2nd term Senate: 19 Republicans, 11 Democrats (1 vacant seat) 7 new Senate members, all Republicans State Board of Education: 10 Republicans, 5 Democrats The shuffling continues with runoffs and replacements 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 4

5 KEY COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS Senate (Reorganization likely under Lt. Gov. Patrick) Education - ? Finance - Nelson State Affairs – Estes House Public Education – Aycock Appropriations - ? Ways & Means - ? Significant Potential for Region 11 (Hancock, Nelson, Zedler) 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 5

6 REVENUE ESTIMATE – EARLY THOUGHTS New Comptroller Hagar presents initial revenue estimate by January 13 The estimate can be modified at any time. General revenue above current biennium spending levels speculated to be in the $15 -$20 billion range. The initial estimate will probably be below these levels. Increased property value provides effective new revenue, likely about $5.7 billion. Estimated price of crude oil ($67/BBL as of yesterday) may hold the key to early revenue estimates. 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 6

7 FISCAL 2014 TAX REVENUE Tax Collections ($1,000s) by Major Tax Compared to Revenue Estimate % over/ (under) estimate Sales Tax$545, % Motor Vehicle Sales and Rental Taxes$125, % Motor Fuel Taxes$72, % Franchise Tax$65, % Insurance Taxes$224, % Natural Gas Production Tax$339, % Cigarette and Tobacco Taxes($56,846)(4.06%) Alcoholic Beverages Taxes$45, % Oil Production and Regulation Taxes$611, % Utility Taxes$51, % Hotel Occupancy Tax$23, % Other Taxes$30, % Total Tax Collections$2,079, % 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 7

8 AVAILABLE GENERAL REVENUE Source Amount (millions) Certification Revenue Estimate$2,548 Unanticipated Revenue Growth Biennium $3,000 Revenue Growth for Biennium (guess) $5,000 Total$10,548 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 8

9 CONSTRAINTS ON SPENDING ADDITIONAL REVENUE Biennial spending limit adopted by LBB on December 1 Base amount of appropriations about $84.4 billion LBB adopted most conservative level presented, 11.68% Limit may be superseded by majority vote of the membership of House and Senate Some (not LBB) pushing for more restrictive inflation plus population measure 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 9

10 CONSTRAINTS ON SPENDING ADDITIONAL REVENUE, CONT. Economic Stabilization Fund (Rainy Day Fund) will divert significant oil and gas revenue and possible surplus funds Allocation may be superseded by 2/3 vote in each house Transportation allocation will reduce prior estimates Estimated balance of $8.5 billion ending the current biennium 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 10

11 COMPETITION Tax Relief Transportation RDF allocation far short of estimated requirements DPS transfer elimination Higher Education Construction package Health and Human Services Current law costs for both biennium TRS Care Increase needed in contributions Water 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 11

12 POSSIBLE EDUCATION FUNDING COURSES OF ACTION Fund inflation and enrollment growth with state and local resources Reserve funds for Supreme Court decision Dedicate RDF funds to education (Constitution) Respond to Dietz opinion Repeat 2013 – Improvement requiring new trial 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 12

13 EDUCATION V. TAX RELIEF State budget Abundant coffers Competing priorities Leadership opposed to investing in government Ruling in the school finance lawsuit 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 13

14 MAJOR ISSUES

15 MAJOR FINANCE & ORGANIZATION ISSUES FOR THE 84TH School finance litigation (Texas Taxpayers v. Williams) Prekindergarten funding Instructional Materials Allotment Funding for charter schools Virtual schools Achievement school districts/low-performing schools Voucher-type programs Debt/transparency 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 15

16 SCHOOL FINANCE LITIGATION (TEXAS TAXPAYERS V. WILLIAMS) Current system is: Inadequate Arbitrary Unsuitable Inequitable And fails the “meaningful discretion” test 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 16

17 INJUNCTION COL 95 – “… this Court hereby enjoins the State Defendants from giving any force and effect to the section of the Education Code relating to the financing of public school education (Chapters 41 and 42 and Section of the Education Code) and from distributing any money under the current Texas school financing system until the constitutional violations are remedied. The effect of this injunction shall be stayed until July 1, 2015 …” 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 17

18 WHAT NEXT - APPEALS Best caseNext StepsMore realistic August 28, 2014Judge Dietz files final judgment & findings of fact August 28, 2014 September 29, 2014Appeal filed (30 days, up to 90) November 26, 2014 October 30, 2014Supreme Court takes caseJanuary/February 2015 January-March 2015 Briefings scheduledLate Spring 2015 May/June 2015Arguments before Supreme Court Late Summer/Early Fall 2015 September 2015Supreme Court issues final ruling Dec. 2015/Jan Fall 2015Legislative response in Special Session Spring/Summer 2016 Source: Thompson & Horton, LLP

19 WHAT NEXT - OPTIONS FOR LEGISLATIVE ACTION Dietz opinion most comprehensive indictment of Texas school finance system ever issued Starting from scratch is not only an option, but is virtually required given the scope of problems in the current system Legislative/Executive reaction Further reduction of standards under consideration Evidence of significant available revenue growth raises issues of financial treatment of education in 2015 Informal efforts to understand current school finance structure Public statements suggest delay until Supreme Court decision (But they said the same thing two years ago) 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 19

20 DECISION AREAS The system fails to provide financial equity between taxpayers and school districts by permitting unconstitutional variations in the tax effort necessary to achieve the necessary operating costs of general diffusion of knowledge (GDK). The system fails to provide financial equity in the provision of school facilities. The system fails to provide sufficient resources for an overall adequate education encompassing the constitutional requirement of the general diffusion of knowledge (GDK). 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 20

21 DECISION AREAS, CONT’D. The inadequacy finding is particularly acute in the funding of programs for Economically Disadvantaged (ED) and English Language Learners (ELL). Current salary levels and staffing patterns represent a major illustration of inadequacy for the overall finance program. School facilities are inadequate to achieving the GDK. Resources for the GDK include funding for quality pre-K programs. 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 21

22 DECISION AREAS, CONT’D. All of the structures used for the provision of state support are out of date and need revision, particularly including special education, small schools, CEI, high school allotment, technology funding, transportation, etc. Absence of discretion for local enrichment above the GDK program. Failure of the state to determine costs of the GDK program. 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 22

23 PREKINDERGARTEN FUNDING Widespread agreement on need for additional funding for pre-K programs Widespread disagreement on methodology Options Restore prior grant program Increase eligibility Increase to full-day support Create quality program for limited cost 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 23

24 INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS ALLOTMENT Criticism of IMA as insufficient Options Continue current program Move to full local choice Combine funding requirements with the basic allotment 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 24

25 FUNDING FOR CHARTER SCHOOLS Charter schools lost in court over funding issues for facilities and operations Charter schools will seek legislative solutions (again) to deal with increased facility funding and funding for small charters 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 25

26 VIRTUAL SCHOOLS Developing interest in virtual school options Potential program by Gov. Abbott 2013 legislation (by Hegar) contains substantial restrictions Significant potential for further development 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 26

27 ACHIEVEMENT SCHOOL DISTRICTS/LOW PERFORMING SCHOOLS Statewide school district for limited number of low- performing schools with state direction and local funding Major political push by combination of conservative groups and some minority legislators Substantial political support in /4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 27

28 VOUCHER-TYPE PROGRAMS Recurring issue Variations in mechanism (straight voucher, taxpayer savings grant, mandatory school choice, tax-funded scholarships, etc.) Major political conflict 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 28

29 DEBT/TRANSPARENCY Forced disclosure of myriad bond issue details (another 2013 issue) Bills defeated on points of order Major advocacy by outgoing Comptroller Combs Unknown position by new Comptroller Hegar Other “transparency issues” likely to surface on the general premise that more information to the public will lead to different results on bond issues, board elections, etc. 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 29

30 MAJOR ISSUES IN ACCOUNTABILITY AND ASSESSMENT

31 GRADUATION PLANS College and career readiness: HB 5 Implementation of endorsements Need for thoughtful student advisement National interest in improving career readiness CCSSO report, Nov SCOPE report (California), Nov Poor state track record in on-time college graduation – CCO report, Dec Lingering incompatibility in IHEs’ admissions requirements versus graduation requirements Efforts to redesign developmental education 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 31

32 ASSESSMENT RFP for state assessment contract: Friday the 13 th (March 13, 2015 is expected date of selection of proposer(s)) Anti-testing sentiment – nationally, not just in Texas Requirements under NCLB and IDEA Doubts about current testing programs after the first three years of implementation Alignment Fairness/validity Impact on students Commissioner correspondence requesting a “higher level” mathematics test at high school level TEA’s request for an additional $30,100,000 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 32

33 TAKS TAAS TEAMS TABS STAAR

34 One Step: 1.Fewest barrels TABS Exit Level Math Started in © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 12/4/2014

35 Two Steps: 1.Find point on graph 2.Multiply 30 pupils x $300 = $9,000 TEAMS Exit Level Math (started in 1986) 35 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 12/4/2014

36 Three Steps: 1.Find paper on pie chart 2.Divide tons of paper by total tons: 72/180 3.Convert to 40% TAAS Exit Level Math (started in 1999) © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 12/4/2014

37 Five Steps: 1.Add all votes = 1,200 2.Determine which student finished 3 rd (Bridget: 240 votes) 3.Determine Bridget’s %age of votes 240 / 1,200 = 20% 4.Know that a pie chart has 360 total degrees 5.Determine 20% of 360 degrees:.20 x 360 = 72 TAKS Exit Level Math (Started in 2003) © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 12/4/2014

38 Five Steps: 1.The student must know how to apply the quadratic formula to find the value of the discrimant 2.Find quadratic equation on formula chart: 3.If there are two real number roots of the equation and the graph of the parabola crosses the x-axis at those roots 4.If there is a “multiple” or repeated root of the equation and the vertex of the graph of the parabola touches the x-axis at that root. 5. If the roots of the equation are imaginary numbers and the graph of the parabola does not intersect the x-axis STAAR (started in 2012) © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 38

39 It’s what the numbers tell us about how well we are preparing our students for Post-Secondary Readiness The Purpose: It’s Not Just About the Numbers © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 12/4/2014

40 STAAR PROFICIENCY LEVELS © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 40 Phase-in 1 currently in effect Phase-in 2 begins Phase-in 3 begins Final Rec. begins /4/2014

41 SPRING 2014 STAAR GR. 3-8 Grades 3-8 Reading and Mathematics, Grades 4 & 7 Writing, Grades 5 & 8 Science, and Grade 8 Social Studies* at Level II Phase-in 1 Standard Statewide Results for All Students, Total # Tests Number of Students TestedPassed Did Not Pass Reading (Gr. 3-8)2,172,4651,656,158516,307 Math (Gr. 3-8)2,079,0741,531,964547,110 Writing (Gr. 4 & 7)728,222520,170208,052 Science (Gr. 5 & 8)717,775516,723201,052 Social Studies (Gr.8)357,107220,269136,838 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 41 *Combined results for English and Spanish test versions. Does not include students testing with STAAR L, Modified or Alternate test versions Source: TEA Statewide STAAR 3-8 Summary Reports; posted May 2014 Total # Tests Failed 1,609,359 76% 74% 71% 72% 62% 12/4/2014

42 *Does not include students testing with STAAR L, Modified or Alternate test versions. Source: TEA Statewide Spring 2014 STAAR EOC All Students Tested Results – includes retester results, posted June 2014 STUDENTS BELOW STANDARDS ON STAAR EOC TESTS AT INITIAL AND FINAL RECOMMENDED PASSING STANDARDS, SPRING 2014* STAAR EOC Tests Required for Graduation* and # of items/pts. for Phase-In 1 Std. # Tested Below Passing Level II Phase-in I Standard* Did Not Pass Below Passing Level II Final Recommended Standard* English I –> 49 / 92pts = 53% of pts.469,915177,078 (38%)282,684 (60%) Algebra I –>20 / 54 = 37% of items388,60873,973 (19%)237,181 (61%) Biology –>20 / 54 = 37% of items359,66433,952 (9%)178,101 (50%) English II –> 50 / 92pts = 54% of pts.386,468131,599 (34%)213,661 (55%) U.S. History -> 28 / 68 = 41% of items315,04925,618 (8%)154,866 (49%) 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 42 Total # Tests Failed = 442,220

43 HOW MANY MORE QUESTIONS? © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 2014 STAAR Raw Scores Required for Level II: Satisfactory and Level III: Advanced Proficiency Level:Phase-In 1Final Rec.Advanced 1 st Admin. Subject Total # of Items Raw Score % Correct Raw Score % Correct Raw Score % Correct 5 th gr. Reading462554%3576%4087% 5 th gr. Math502754%3978%4488% 8 th gr. Reading522650%3873%4485% 8 th gr. Math562239%3664%4988% Source: TEA STAAR Raw Score Conversion Tables, May /4/2014

44 HOW MANY MORE QUESTIONS? © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 2014 STAAR Raw Scores Required for Level II: Satisfactory and Level III: Advanced Proficiency Level:Phase-In 1Final Rec.Advanced EOC Subject Total # of Items/Pts. Raw Score % Correct Raw Score % Correct Raw Score % Correct Algebra I542037%3463%4278% Biology542037%3361%4583% U.S. History682841%4465%5581% English I924953%5863%7683% English II925054%6064%7986% Source: TEA STAAR Raw Score Conversion Tables, May /4/2014

45 CURRENT PERFORMANCE

46 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 46 + Include all students who had assessment results for the Biology, English I, English II, and U.S. History STAAR EOC assessments. Includes STAAR L for Algebra I, Biology and U.S. History. Commissioner’s HB 5 transition rules for ELA applied. Source: TEA handout - Senate Education Hearing, August ,000 seniors need to pass 1 or more EOCs in Dec. or May

47 STAAR PHASE-IN 1, LEVEL II PERFORMANCE STATEWIDE All Subjects77% Reading79%80%76% Mathematics77%79%78% Writing67%63%72% Science80%82%78% Social Studies79%76% 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 47 DATA WILL BE AVAILABLE FROM TAPR REPORTS DURING THE DAY TODAY Source, 2012 and 2013 data: TEA, Texas Performance Reporting System STAAR Performance Results, all students in the accountability subset. Note: Data may not be comparable over time due to changes in availability of assessment data, such as inclusion of STAAR Modified, STAAR Alternate, STAAR L and multiple administrations of reading and mathematics tests in grades 5 and 8. (Accountability Subset)

48 STAAR LEVEL III ADVANCED PERFORMANCE STATEWIDE All Subjects12%13%15% Reading15%17%15% Mathematics14%15%17% Writing6%4%8% Science9%10%14% Social Studies9% 15% 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 48 DATA WILL BE AVAILABLE FROM TAPR REPORTS DURING THE DAY TODAY Source, 2012 and 2013 data: TEA, Texas Performance Reporting System STAAR Performance Results, all students in the accountability subset. Note: Data may not be comparable over time due to changes in availability of assessment data, such as inclusion of STAAR Modified, STAAR Alternate, STAAR L and multiple administrations of reading and mathematics tests in grades 5 and 8. (Accountability Subset)

49 LEGISLATIVE INTEREST IN A “SAFETY NET” FOR CLASS OF 2015 SB 149 by Sen. Seliger: Two committee-based means by which students can satisfy graduation examination requirements Course performance and meeting at least 3 out of 8 additional criteria Committee review of substantial body of evidence 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 49

50 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 50

51 A STUDY IN CONTRASTS: ACCOUNTABILITY Multiple systems with contrasting results Multiple state evaluation mechanisms Locally determined CaSE ratings Local metrics for monitoring progress and quality Opposition to “lowered” standards Quest for solutions How to build accountability systems that work How to improve schools that are not performing well 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 51

52 RATINGS SYSTEM OUTCOMES (POST-APPEALS, 12/3/2014) 1,107 (90%) of districts or charters rated as “Met Standard” or “AEA: Met Standard” 7,285 (85%) of campuses rated as “Met Standard” or “AEA: Met Standard” 110 (9%) of districts or charters rated as “Improvement Required” 69 of those for the first time 733 (8.5%) of campuses rated as “Improvement Required,” 436 for the first time 297 are now Year 2+ IR/AU © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 52 Sources: TEA, Highlights of the 2014 Accountability System and Multi-Year Improvement Required List, 12/4/2014

53 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 53 12/4/2014

54 54 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates Source: TEA 12/4/2014 HB 5 – COMMUNITY & STUDENT ENGAGEMENT RATINGS

55 POLICIES AND PRESSURE POINTS

56 WHAT’S NOT WORKING… (YET, AS INTENDED, OR AS DESIRED) HB-5 related Need for high-quality and accessible counseling and advisement services SBOE role in course approval (AP US History) – HB 374 by Rep. Simmons Waiver-related Defying double-testing On-going desire to pare back state testing despite federal requirements 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 56

57 WHAT’S NOT WORKING… (YET, AS INTENDED, OR AS DESIRED) State accountability decisions and limits of commissioner authority to revise some requirements Unintended disincentives for dropout recovery Possible premature use of advanced performance standards Time line for final 2015 accountability decisions: Too late to address instruction The graduation rate “bubble” that may be about to explode… after the session ends! Specific or narrowly-defined issues, such as AAR Guidance needed from TEA Display of certain information on diplomas versus transcripts – HB 181 by Rep. Bell 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 57

58 FORECASTING PRODUCTIVITY OF THE 84 TH LEGISLATURE & ITS AFTERMATH

59 TOPICS ADDRESSED BY PRE-FILED BILLS Class size Discipline Decriminalization of truancy School start date Prekindergarten Finance Salaries and personnel, including counselors Property tax and tax relief Assessment and accountability 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 59

60 PRE-FILED BILLS – CLASS SIZE HB 51 by Gonzalez – 28 students in grades 5-8 HB 171 by Alvarado – 22 students in grade 5 HB 173 by Alvarado – reporting on class sizes and assessment instruments in PK SB 73 by Ellis – 18 students in PK, starting /4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 60

61 PRE-FILED BILLS - DISCIPLINE SB 106 by Whitmire – Limits when enrollment of certain students can be revoked; provides truancy prevention measures; provides escalating fines for truancy, but no longer a Class C misdemeanor SB 107 by Whitmire – More flexibility for student removals from class and/or school; makes most mandatory removals discretionary; extends due process to more scenarios associated with removal and requires conferences with parents SB 108 by Whitmire – Limits when complaints of truancy can be dismissed or convictions expunged 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 61

62 PRE-FILED BILLS - FIRST DAY HB 204 by Leach – Second Monday in August HB 238 by Springer – Third Monday in August if < 3,000 enrollment in county with less than 50,000 population 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 62

63 PRE-FILED BILLS - PREKINDERGARTEN HB 124 by Martinez-Fischer – Must offer PK if year-olds identified in district; open to all 4-year- olds HB 186 by Thompson and SB 72 by Ellis - Must offer PK if 15 4-year-olds identified in district; open to all 4-year-olds SB 23 by Zaffirini - Must offer full-day PK if 15 4-year- olds identified in district; open to all 4-year-olds 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 63

64 PRE-FILED BILLS - FINANCE SB 103 by Hinojosa – Prohibition on capital appreciation bonds HB 125 by Martinez-Fischer – Study the cost of education index HB 256 by Howard – allows use of compensatory allotment for day-care HJR 26 by Martinez-Fischer - $10.10 minimum wage SB 161 by Rodriguez – Increase bilingual weight to /4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 64

65 PRE-FILED BILLS - SALARY, PERSONNEL HB 47 by Martinez – Directs commissioner to come up with method for annually setting minimum salaries SB 110 by Taylor – Allows courts to withhold public pensions from individuals convicted of certain offenses in the performance of their duties SB 167 by Lucio – Allots funds for counselors and minimum requirements for employing counselors 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 65

66 PRE-FILED BILLS - PROPERTY TAX / TAX RELIEF HB 52/HJR 30 by Martinez – Increase homestead exemption to $45,000 SB 156/SJR 14 by Nichols – Cap appraisal growth at 5% HB 193 by Murphy, HB 250 by Leach, SB 138 by Perry – Phaseout and repeal of franchise tax SB 105 by Estes, SB 175 by Huffines – Repeal of franchise tax SB 182 by Bettencourt – Rollback rate calculations and election requirements for cities, counties, and other jurisdictions 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 66

67 PRE-FILED BILLS, ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY Limitations on how school counselors can spend their time HB 357, Rep. Mary Gonzalez (20% on non-guidance and counseling duties) SB 165 by Sen. Lucio (10% on non- guidance and counseling duties) Notice when no counselor is assigned for 30 consecutive days: SB 164, Sen. Lucio 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 67

68 PRE-FILED BILLS, ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY Testing and standards, all by Rep. Gonzalez HB 43, task force on STAAR Alt. 2 HB 56, evaluate the ELPS HB 73, alternative methods of assessing students with significant cognitive disabilities HB 406, task force on assessment and accountability 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 68

69 PRE-FILED BILLS, ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY HB 407 by Rep. Gonzalez: Ability for districts to select testing programs HB 356 by Rep. Gonzalez: TEA to seek waiver on assessment of students with significant cognitive disabilities SB 149 by Sen. Seliger, discussed earlier 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 69

70 PRE-FILED BILLS - OTHER HB 45 by Martinez – Cost-of-living increase for TRS retirees HB 129 by Goldman – Dedicate motor vehicle sales tax revenue to highways (currently 25% to Foundation, 75% to General Revenue) HB 145 by Martinez-Fischer – Pass general appropriations act, sunset bills, and school finance bills by 100 th day HB 202 by Leach – Dedicate 50% of motor vehicle sales tax revenue to highways 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 70

71 PRE-FILED BILLS - OTHER, CONT. HB 279 by Simmons – Allows any special education student to use public education grant program to transfer to another district or campus SB 101 / SJR 7 by Hinojosa – Exempts state debt from constitutional spending limit SB 137 / SJR 11 by Perry – Limit growth in all appropriations to lesser of personal income growth or combination of population and inflation 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 71

72 EXPECTED LEGISLATION NOT YET FILED Key legislators have signaled intent to re-introduce bills from the last session, including one that failed only at the last step on a technicality Achievement school districts, 83 rd Session: SB 1718 by Sen. Royce West – almost passed! SB 1407 by Sen. Dan Patrick HB 1957 by Rep. Harold Dutton 12/4/2014 © 2014 Moak Casey and Associates 72

73 Curtis Culwell, Ed. D. Rebecca Flores Chris Grammer Kathy Mathias Bob Popinski Larry Throm Maria Whitsett, Ph. D. Joe Wisnoski Associates Lynn M. Moak Daniel T. Casey Partners Thomas V. Alvis, Ph. D. Dee Carney Larry Groppel, Ed. D. Mary McKeown-Moak, Ph. D. Alicia Thomas, Ph. D. Consultants Susan Moak Kari Ruehman Administrative Staff 400 West 15 th Street, Suite 1410, Austin, Texas Ph. (512) Fax (512)


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