Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

“Boys, Gender and School Literacy Achievement: Current Insights and Possible Ways Forward” RAI Presentation Cork Education Support Centre Cork Education.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "“Boys, Gender and School Literacy Achievement: Current Insights and Possible Ways Forward” RAI Presentation Cork Education Support Centre Cork Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 “Boys, Gender and School Literacy Achievement: Current Insights and Possible Ways Forward” RAI Presentation Cork Education Support Centre Cork Education Support Centre Monday May 18 th 2009 Dr. Brian Murphy, Education Department, UCC

2 PISA findings 2006 for reading literacy with respect to the gender variable “Females obtained significantly higher mean reading literacy scores than males in all participating countries” (Eivers et al. 2007, p. 22)“Females obtained significantly higher mean reading literacy scores than males in all participating countries” (Eivers et al. 2007, p. 22) Mean scores for reading literacyMean scores for reading literacy GIRLSBOYS GAP GIRLSBOYS GAP PISA 2006 average511.2473.0+38.2 PISA 2006 (Ireland) 534.0500.2+33.8 Percentage of students scoring at highest proficiency Level 5Percentage of students scoring at highest proficiency Level 5 GIRLSBOYS GAP PISA 2006 average11.0%6.2%+4.8% PISA 2006 (Ireland)14.6.%8.7%+5.9% Over twice the number of boys scored at or below the lowest proficiency Level 1Over twice the number of boys scored at or below the lowest proficiency Level 1 GIRLSBOYS GAP PISA 2006 average14.2%25.8%+11.6% PISA 2006 (Ireland)7.7%16.7%+9%

3 PISA trends for reading literacy in Ireland with respect to the gender variable Across PISA 2000, 2003 & 2006 a consistent trend emerges with respect to reading achievement in IrelandAcross PISA 2000, 2003 & 2006 a consistent trend emerges with respect to reading achievement in Ireland Mean reading literacy scoresMean reading literacy scores GIRLSBOYS GAP GIRLSBOYS GAP PISA 2000542513+29 PISA 2003530501+29 PISA 2006534500+34 Over twice the number of boys scored at or below the lowest level of reading proficiency (level 1)Over twice the number of boys scored at or below the lowest level of reading proficiency (level 1) GIRLSBOYS GAP PISA 20008.3%13.5.% +5.2% PISA 20037.7%14.3% +6.6% PISA 20067.7%16.7% +9 %

4 Trends re gender and reading from PISA 2000, 2003 & 2006 In all OECD countries girls recorded higher levels of engagement and interest in reading and higher levels of performance in reading literacyIn all OECD countries girls recorded higher levels of engagement and interest in reading and higher levels of performance in reading literacyGirls: Perform better on reading both main types of texts – but especially on continuous textPerform better on reading both main types of texts – but especially on continuous text Report reading a more diverse range of materials (beyond newspaper, magazines and comics especially fiction)Report reading a more diverse range of materials (beyond newspaper, magazines and comics especially fiction) Read more frequently for leisureRead more frequently for leisure Hold a more positive attitude to readingHold a more positive attitude to reading

5 Trends re gender and reading from PISA 2000, 2003 & 2006 High percentage of males who never read fiction for leisure (33.1% boys v. 18.9% girls, PISA 2003)High percentage of males who never read fiction for leisure (33.1% boys v. 18.9% girls, PISA 2003) Girls outperformed boys on the three reading process subscales (reflect/evaluate, interpret, retrieve)Girls outperformed boys on the three reading process subscales (reflect/evaluate, interpret, retrieve) Largest difference (37.2 points) on the reflect/evaluate scaleLargest difference (37.2 points) on the reflect/evaluate scale Smallest (22.3) on the retrieve scale (PISA 2003 findings cited in Shiel 2006, p. 88)Smallest (22.3) on the retrieve scale (PISA 2003 findings cited in Shiel 2006, p. 88)

6 Clear reality emerging… What is clear is that across OECD nations girls of all social classes and of a majority of ethnic groups outstrip the achievement of their male counterparts at language and literacy (Francis, 2006)

7 Summary of issue…Core dimensions… An international and Irish problem with boys’ achievement in schooling generallyAn international and Irish problem with boys’ achievement in schooling generally Boys more likely than girls to have specific problems with basic literacyBoys more likely than girls to have specific problems with basic literacy Significant gender differences in text choice, amount of time and enthusiasm given to readingSignificant gender differences in text choice, amount of time and enthusiasm given to reading

8 Summary of issue…Core dimensions… As they progress through school reading seen as an activity more appropriate to girls than boys and differences widen (Smith & Wilhelm 2002, Millard 1997)As they progress through school reading seen as an activity more appropriate to girls than boys and differences widen (Smith & Wilhelm 2002, Millard 1997) Boys failing to make proper progress in literacy and their peer cultures and school contexts exacerbate their difficulties (Hall & Coles, 2001, p. 212) across the developed worldBoys failing to make proper progress in literacy and their peer cultures and school contexts exacerbate their difficulties (Hall & Coles, 2001, p. 212) across the developed world Gap appears to be widening of lateGap appears to be widening of late

9 In summary… “…language - both talk and the in- school business of literacy - is not something boys need or want to see themselves good at, it is not something which interests them, not something they DO.” (Carr & Pauwels 2006, p. 168)

10 Important caveats to the overall discussion Boys not a homogenous group - no such thing as a generic boyBoys not a homogenous group - no such thing as a generic boy Some boys, certain boys and not all boys are underachieving and not all girls are succeeding or outperforming boysSome boys, certain boys and not all boys are underachieving and not all girls are succeeding or outperforming boys Particular problem with in-school language and literacy practices as boys identified to engage powerfully with a range of out-of-school literacy practices rarely drawn upon in classroomsParticular problem with in-school language and literacy practices as boys identified to engage powerfully with a range of out-of-school literacy practices rarely drawn upon in classrooms

11 Important caveats to the overall discussion Gender one of a range of factors that impact on educational attainment. Impact of other variables e.g. ethnicity but particularly socio- economic statusGender one of a range of factors that impact on educational attainment. Impact of other variables e.g. ethnicity but particularly socio- economic status Gender as a social construct, shaped by larger cultural, institutional and material processesGender as a social construct, shaped by larger cultural, institutional and material processes Conditions and performance of gender dictated by a variety of material, social and psychological and individual life circumstancesConditions and performance of gender dictated by a variety of material, social and psychological and individual life circumstances

12 An alternative model Traditional binary model generally used to rationalise the issueTraditional binary model generally used to rationalise the issue Position encapsulated in the Sé Sí – Gender in Irish Education report in the following quote:Position encapsulated in the Sé Sí – Gender in Irish Education report in the following quote: “It is difficult to assess the extent to which this reflects innate dispositions towards different subject areas and the extent to which it arises as a consequence of socialisation and social conditioning.” (DES 2007, p.4)“It is difficult to assess the extent to which this reflects innate dispositions towards different subject areas and the extent to which it arises as a consequence of socialisation and social conditioning.” (DES 2007, p.4)

13 Binary model of explanation Difference in learning/language learning between boys and girls has been attributed to two broad headings (nature/nurture debate) (i)The essentialist (nature) position A biological/neurological/physiological argument where gender/gender difference is a matter of biology and biological sex

14 Binary model of explanation (ii)The anti-essentialist (nurture) position The individual learner as socially constituted and socially situated negotiating cultural and material circumstances A socio-cultural argument where gender/gender difference is about socially constructed maleness and femaleness and performance of same (gender=verb, are/have but also do gender)

15 Further explanations: Binary model + Essentialist (nature) positionEssentialist (nature) position Anti-essentialist (nurture) positionAnti-essentialist (nurture) position In conjunction with specific dimensions generally labelled… Identified gendered reading behavioursIdentified gendered reading behaviours School and curriculum factorsSchool and curriculum factors Home background factorsHome background factors

16 Some identified responses No one-size-fits all strategy…about changing ways of thinking rather than prescribing ways of doing…No one-size-fits all strategy…about changing ways of thinking rather than prescribing ways of doing… The essentialist response…The essentialist response… The anti-essentialist response…The anti-essentialist response…

17 A middle ground response A balanced middle-ground emerging comprising: A richer diet of textA richer diet of text A richer diet of text activityA richer diet of text activity The ‘transformative’ or ‘rhizomatic’ literacy pedagogical framework (Rowan et al. 2002)The ‘transformative’ or ‘rhizomatic’ literacy pedagogical framework (Rowan et al. 2002) Embraces use of digital texts and popular culture as ‘counter narratives’Embraces use of digital texts and popular culture as ‘counter narratives’ Requires deconstruction of many assumptions associated with boys, essentialist views of literacy, technology and popular culture through text and practiceRequires deconstruction of many assumptions associated with boys, essentialist views of literacy, technology and popular culture through text and practice


Download ppt "“Boys, Gender and School Literacy Achievement: Current Insights and Possible Ways Forward” RAI Presentation Cork Education Support Centre Cork Education."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google