Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Expanding Connections: Priorities and Resources University of North Carolina (UNC) India Summit Chapel Hill, North Carolina January 30, 2013 1 Embassy.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Expanding Connections: Priorities and Resources University of North Carolina (UNC) India Summit Chapel Hill, North Carolina January 30, 2013 1 Embassy."— Presentation transcript:

1 Expanding Connections: Priorities and Resources University of North Carolina (UNC) India Summit Chapel Hill, North Carolina January 30, Embassy of India, Washington DC DC

2 2 Scheme of Presentation 1. India: Higher Education Scenario2. India US Co-operation in Education sector3. Road ahead 2 Embassy of India, Washington DC

3 India’s Demographic Advantage…. 3 Embassy of India, Washington DC Source: India’s XII Plan document, Vol III

4 4 Scheme of Presentation 1. India: Higher Education Scenario2. India US Co-operation in Education sector3. Road ahead 4 Embassy of India, Washington DC

5 5 Growth in enrollment in higher education… …GER went up from 12.3 % in to 17.9 % in ……. Embassy of India, Washington DC Source: India’s XII Plan document, Vol III All figures in millions

6 Institutional expansion in the XI Plan.. 6 Embassy of India, Washington DC Source: India’s XII Plan document, Vol III All figures in millions

7 7 The growth is skewed…… Embassy of India, Washington DC Source: Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD), Government of India (GoI)

8 8 The growth is skewed…… Embassy of India, Washington DC Source: Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD), Government of India (GoI)

9 Characterized by quality issues…. As per the Times Higher Education Rankings , the top ranked Indian institutions are Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) at Kharagpur (234); Mumbai (258) and Roorkee (267). As per the Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) System, 2012, these were the Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) at Delhi (212), Bombay (227) and Kanpur (278). Embassy of India, Washington DC Source: MHRD, GoI

10 10 XII Plan strategy on higher education… 10 EXPANSIONEQUITYEXCELLENCE Capacity expansion of existing institutions Institutional differentiation Widespread use of ICT Increased budgetary support for targeted equity schemes Learner centric approach Focus on teaching research synergy Faculty development Internationalisation Creation of alliances/ networks Financing Quantum leap in public and private sector funding Increased and strategically deployed Central funding Funding streams connected to outcomes Governance Institutional autonomy Widespread and co-ordinated regulatory reform Expanded availability of higher education Narrowing of group inequalities in access to higher education Improved teaching & research across all institutions Outcomes Embassy of India, Washington DC

11 11 Scheme of Presentation 1. India: Higher Education Scenario2. India US Co-operation in Education sector3. Road ahead 11 Embassy of India, Washington DC

12 12 Co-operation in higher education: status 12 US remains a preferred destination for Indian students to pursue their advanced degrees.  100,000 Indian students enrolled in US institutions – 32% women.  Annual investment by Indian students in the US education sector: US $ 3 billion.  Large number of Indian faculty rising to key positions in US academia.  More than 17,000 US and Indian students benefited through Nehru-Fulbright and Khorana scholarships. Singh Obama 21 st Century Knowledge Initiative launched in November,  Funding support of US $ 5 million provided by both sides to increase university linkages and junior faculty development exchanges between US and Indian universities.  First awards under the initiative announced in June,  Advertisements inviting applications for the second round of awards have been published by the UGC. Embassy of India, Washington DC

13 13 Co-operation in higher education: status… 13 First India US Higher Education Summit held in Washington DC in October, The two sides – in the joint statement – agree to:  Promote strategic institutional partnership for strengthening and expanding collaboration in priority areas of higher education.  Encourage expansion and deepened collaboration in R&D.  Foster partnerships in areas of vocational education and skill enhancement.  Strengthen further programmes of student and faculty enrichment and exchange.  Welcome involvement of private sector in the two countries to support and deepen such collaboration. First India US Higher Education Dialogue held in Washington DC in June, The following outcomes were announced:  First awards under the Singh Obama knowledge initiative. Embassy of India, Washington DC

14 14 Co-operation in higher education: status… 14 Outcomes of Higher Education Dialogue:…..  Selection for the first batch of 300 fellowships for faculty development and post- doctoral research, with UGC to sponsor about 1,500 fellowships for the purpose over 5 years.  Launch of a web-portal for India US Higher Education collaboration.  Strategy for setting up of community colleges in India: an international seminar on community colleges is being planned to be organized during February 6-7, 2012 in New Delhi.  Finalization of the twinning arrangements at institutional level.  Invitation to US students for studying in India by declaring “Connect to India” program.  Establishment of a joint center of excellence on cyber security with the IITs to incubate a Centre in India with collaboration of US institutions. Connect India Programme: Delhi University to host the programme for about 200 students in the initial years to enable them to understand the life and culture of India. Programme duration about days. To be upgraded by UGC for a semester, with more institutions and credit transfer arrangements. Embassy of India, Washington DC

15 15 Co-operation in higher education: status… 15 Passport to India programme:  Initiative of US Department of State.  Aimed at building the next generation of leaders with Indian expertise by creating study and internship opportunities for US students in India.  Relies fully on private funded philanthropic support.  Works with foundations and businesses to sponsor US students for internships in their India based facilities, to expand existing internship programmes or to provide funding or in-kind contributions for study abroad programmes in a college of university of their choice. Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) signed between Yale University and Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and Indian Institute of Management, Kozhikode: MoU aimed at developing leadership programmes in areas of higher education. Two centres of excellence developed in academic leadership at IIT, Kanpur and IIM, Kozhikode. “India Yale Higher Education Leadership Programme” held at New Haven in September-October, Embassy of India, Washington DC

16 16 Scheme of Presentation 1. India: Higher Education Scenario2. India US Co-operation in Education sector3. Road ahead 16 Embassy of India, Washington DC

17 17 Paradigm for future India US co- operation in higher education sector 17 Entry of Foreign (including US) education institutions in accordance with a prescribed regulatory framework:  The Foreign Educational Institutions (Regulation of Entry and Operations) Bill, 2010 introduced in Parliament.  Only reputed and quality institutions are proposed to be allowed to enter and operate in India - Foreign institutes, which have been offering educational services for at least 20 years in the country in which it had been established or incorporated, shall be eligible to apply for registration.  With the passing of this Bill, US universities can set up campuses in India. 100% foreign direct investment (FDI) is already allowed in the education sector. Collaborations between institutions on both sides based on mutual interest:  Indian institutions autonomous in this regard; models of collaboration have no restrictions.

18 18 Paradigm for future India US co-operation in higher education sector.. 18 Opportunities for faculty in India:  Prime Minister’s Global Advisory Council has stressed on engagement of international faculty in Indian institutions.  Reputed institutions in India (including private institutions) have started engaging faculty from different countries on contract on attractive remunerations. Permanent engagement of faculty of foreign origin still not permitted as per Visa Rules (only for a period of 5 years).  Huge potential for engagement through twinning arrangements with different institutions.  Under Singh Obama initiative, scope for engagement through joint research projects. Opportunities for US students to study in India:  Connect India and Passport to India programmes provide opportunities, to be expanded in the years ahead, for large number of US students to visit India and learn more about its political, economic, cultural and social milieu.  India and the US have signed a new bilateral Fulbright Agreement that supersedes the Fulbright Agreement operating since 1950 with US funding.

19 19 Paradigm for future India US co-operation in higher education sector.. 19 Opportunities for US students to study in India:..  Under the new Fulbright Agreement, the Government of India and the United States will implement the scholarship programme as full partners. The amount has been increased to US $7.06 million (from US $ 5 million) from the financial year For the year , 180 US Nehru-Fulbright Scholars have been selected, with102 scholars selected from India. Collaboration in open and distance (ODL):  Apart from the Indira Gandhi National Open University, there are 13 State Open Universities and 183 other Distance Education Institutions (DEIs) approved by the Distance Education Council.  Enrolment in DEIs that includes at least 44 private institutions grew most rapidly over 10 per cent per year during the XI Plan period.  Open and Distance Learning (ODL) will be used to widen access and significantly expand capacity in a cost-effective and flexible manner during the XII Plan – a capacity addition of 1 million in gross enrollment is to come from this source.  Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are increasingly proving their effectiveness in the spread of education in the US.

20 20 Paradigm for future India US co-operation in higher education sector.. 20 Collaboration in open and distance (ODL):…  Programmes such as Coursera and EdX are providing education in diverse areas such as Mongolia and Egypt, in state-of-the-art disciplines.  ODL presents a significant area of collaboration between India and US. Development of Meta Universities:  The digital world is challenging the lecture-driven teaching traditions of the university.  With open content and open-access, we are seeing the early emergence of a meta-university, a concept pioneered by Charles West, as an accessible, empowering, communally constructed framework of open materials and platforms ushering the collaborative future of higher education.  Thus the 21st century meta-university would be a network and an ecosystem rather than a single brick and mortar space - a Facebook of Institutions.  Delhi University and Jamia Millia Islamia (JMI) in India are engaged in development of Meta University concept.  Development of Meta Universities in India opens up a significant area of collaboration between the two countries.

21 “……the young are our future. We have a responsibility to create an appropriate environment to help them plan their future. We must help them face the challenges of tomorrow to reshape the world. In a global, interconnected, mutually dependent world, the way forward is through building partnerships. This historic Summit will forge a new collaborative association in which our young can draw inspiration from your benchmarks of excellence in education & innovation and channelise their energies for public good. Today, we dedicate our partnership for a better tomorrow…..”.. Shri Kapil Sibal, the then Minister for Human Resource Development, at the India US Education Summit, October, 2011

22 22 Thank You 22

23 23 Increasing access in the XII Plan…. 23 Enrolment capacity to increase by 10 million: Strategies: Develop Central Institutions as Quality Leading institutions Strategic support for State Higher Education Quality Private Growth Expansion of skill based programmes Open and distance learning initiatives Level/ Type Doctorates Post/ Under graduates Diplomas Distance Learning Grand Total GER (%) Embassy of India, Washington DC Source: India’s XII Plan document, Vol III

24 24 Increasing equity in the XII Plan…. 24 Strategies: Creation of a comprehensive student financial aid programme:  All student financial aid schemes under the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD) to be consolidated under a single programme, with simplified processes, and disbursement to be related to an ‘index of disadvantage’. Student loan guarantee corpus to be created under the management of a Credit Guarantee Trust to guarantee against defaults on student loans.  A s per studies, less than 3% students, mostly belonging to middle income families in India avail of education loans, compared to 85% in UK, 77% in US and 70% in Germany and France.  Education loans aggregating US $ 6 billion are outstanding and the average size of the Education loan is less than US $ 4,000 as per the data published by the Indian Banks Association.  It is envisaged that out of the total Students enrolled for Higher studies, 10% to 18% and 35% to 40% students may seek loan for general and technical studies respectively during the period , if the Government strengthen institutions and regulations in this sector. Embassy of India, Washington DC

25 25 Increasing excellence in the XII Plan…. 25 Strategies: Focus on teachers and teaching:  A recent survey of academic salaries shows that median academic salaries in India are among the highest in the world.  Collaborations with foreign universities for faculty development programmes.  Faculty would be sent in large numbers abroad for training and mentoring. Strengthening Accreditation Systems:  Accreditation will be made mandatory with clear incentives and consequences. ‘Universities for Research and Innovation’ to be set up.  Structured in a manner to attract and retain high quality faculty from across the world. Special efforts to be made to strengthen international research linkages involving a large number of Indian institutions in forging such links:  Involvement of 22 million-strong Indian Diaspora as a powerful asset for research, innovation and entrepreneurship. Embassy of India, Washington DC

26 26 Governance architecture in the XII Plan….. 26 Higher Education Institutions National Educational Tribunals State Educational Tribunals National Commission for Higher Education & Research National Regulatory Authority in Accreditation Accreditation Agencies Prevention of Unfair Practices Embassy of India, Washington DC

27 27 Funding for the Plan…. 27 Plan targets public spending to increase to 1.5 % of GDP as against the current 1.22 % of GDP. Quantum jump in the level of funding to State universities and colleges:  Strategically used to foster academic and administrative reforms, address challenges and fill in the gaps in the States’ own funding for higher education. The fee levels of public funded institutions to increase to sustainable levels. Institutions to be encouraged to increase funding through own sources, e.g., external contracts/ grants for research; consulting and/ or training projects; endowments and philanthropy. Involvement of private sector on a large scale:  Innovative ways to be found to encourage the infusion of more private capital in the traditional not-for-profit higher education.  Use of the public private partnership (PPP) framework. Embassy of India, Washington DC

28 28 Awards announced under the Singh Obama Knowledge Initiative 28 S No Institutions Subject of study IndianUS 1Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam Brown University, Duke University, Plymouth State University An Interdisciplinary and Community Oriented Approach towards sustainable development 2Benaras Hindu University, Varanasi University of PittsburghParadigm shift in energy scenario in the 21 st century towards renewable energy sources 3Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kanpur Virginia Tech UniversityInternational Program for sustainable infrastructure development 4Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Delhi Drexel UniversityResource Building for Ecosystem and Human Health risk assessment with specific reference to microbial contamination 5Rutgers, the State University of New York Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai Capitalizing on the demographic dividend enhancing talent development capacity for India and US in the 21 st century 6University of MontanaUniversity of BangaloreImpact of climate change and changes in socio- economic structure on traditional agriculture and development of sustainable communities among indigenous populations. Embassy of India, Washington DC

29 29 Awards announced under the Singh Obama Knowledge Initiative…. 29 S No Institutions Subject of study IndianUS 7Cornell UniversityUniversity of Agricultural sciences, Dharwad; Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel University, Meerut Implementing reformed cirriculum in emerging areas of agriculture and food security 8University of MichiganMaharashtra University of the Health Sciences Joint Development of a Master’s degree in education for health professions’ faculty in the US and India Embassy of India, Washington DC


Download ppt "Expanding Connections: Priorities and Resources University of North Carolina (UNC) India Summit Chapel Hill, North Carolina January 30, 2013 1 Embassy."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google