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ICTs and Globalization: Asking Important Questions Internet and communications technologies (ICTs) agile computing ubiquitous computing information society.

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Presentation on theme: "ICTs and Globalization: Asking Important Questions Internet and communications technologies (ICTs) agile computing ubiquitous computing information society."— Presentation transcript:

1 ICTs and Globalization: Asking Important Questions Internet and communications technologies (ICTs) agile computing ubiquitous computing information society technologies information technologies

2 ICT The influence of ICTs has been dramatic, and their future evolution is anticipated to profoundly alter everyday life from the routine and mundane to the novel and unconventional. Some argue for and promote ICTs as the next economic wave,with the potential to generate jobs, wealth, and prosperity to surpass

3 ICT ICTs are focused on process, yet they also stimulate the continuous innovation of products. ICTs have the potential to improve energy and materials

4 ICT ICTs may also bring democratic opportunitiesto all corners of the world, empowering the poor and disenfranchised alike. the interactions of ICTs with social processes

5 ICT ICTs are an essential source of information and communications. ICTs have the capacity to enable the dispersion of information and communications to every corner of the globe.

6 ICT those who develop and create ICTs have become increasingly specialized

7 In the context of its social embeddedness, what might be the ultimate environmental and social implications of ICTs? Do ICTs have the potential to become the channel for increased consumption, much as the preceding industrial era ushered in mass consumption, and lifestyles and behavior based on the consumer as a central actor in economic growth and globalization? Will ICTs dematerialize and immaterialize the human economy, permitting continued growth and prosperity with less environmental damage and with increased freedoms and social equality unseen in previous eras? What are the variables determining one trajectory over another? Can we control those variables to ensure more sustainable consumption? If so, where are the vital points for intervention?

8 What happens to the vast quantities of electronic wastes generated annually? Why does consumption demand continue to rise, and can we afford this socially or environmentally? Will a rising tide, and the potential contribution of ICTs, help enhance their well-being or merely widen the divide?

9 ICTs might enable more efficient growth, creating the politically palatable perception of win-win scenarios, offering hope to billions by raising their standard of living and achieving a more efficient consumption per gross domestic product.

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12 When the tally was compiled, theeconomic fallout cost an estimated $4 to $10 billion in U.S. dollars Gross domestic product (GDP) in Canada fell 0.7 percent in August million work hours were lost Ontario manufacturing shipments were down $2.3 billion in Canadian dollars

13 CONSUMPTION ACTIVITY Consumption activities, patterns, and levels of material and energy throughput help define who we are and increasingly both affect and are affected by globalization These effects can in turn induce human responses that alter the transborder characteristics and velocity of globalization.

14 CONSUMPTION ACTIVITY.Everything we do, each activity we perform, is associated with, often directly, the consumption of energy and usually some form of materials “Has this habituation been unconsciously taken too far, and, if so, why?”

15 GLOBAL EFFECTS OF OUR CONSUMPTION ACTIVITIES While we easily observe the effects of our consumption activity at local and regional scales, the global consequences are far more difficult to perceive or confront

16 GLOBAL EFFECTS OF OUR CONSUMPTION ACTIVITIES In the Arctic regions, areas already experiencing the greatest impacts from climate changes, warming may thaw permafrost, which may cause increased methane emissions and establish a positive feedback cycle. The Inuit of northern Canada, for example, have had to cope with a much later freeze in autumn and earlier thaw in spring. Many people in Latin America and Southeast Asia experience effects from increasingly intense storms. Africans are coping with longer and more intense droughts, and, like the Middle East, are fighting wars over declining resources such as water.

17 GLOBAL CONSUMPTION ON A FINITE PLANET In the early 1960s, humans were using about 70 per cent of nature’s output by the early 1980s, we’d reached 100 per cent and in 1999 we were at 125 per cent

18 SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION a reduced burden of producing, using, and disposing of goods and services; satisfying basic needs for key consumption goods and services, such as food, water, life- long learning, sanitation, and shelter;

19 TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING Conventional development models have sought to compensate for their own shortcomings by attempting to incorporate more people into the consumer economy, and through economic growth


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