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DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 How to be a Rocket Scientist Rocket Workshop.

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Presentation on theme: "DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 How to be a Rocket Scientist Rocket Workshop."— Presentation transcript:

1 DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 How to be a Rocket Scientist Rocket Workshop

2 ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 Rocket Workshop  How do rockets work?  Curriculum links and possible activities  Flying model rockets –Costs, sources –Regulations –Flight instructions –Safety  Building a rocket  Flying rockets in Victoria Park (time and weather permitting)

3 ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 Thrust Is What We Need!  Rockets do not “push” against anything –If they did, how would they work in space?  Law of conservation of momentum –Comes from Newton’s laws of motion  Δm is small, but the exhaust gas is hot, so momentum change is large..

4 ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 Generic Curriculum Links  Sc1 – Scientific Enquiry –Ideas and Evidence (1b) –Investigative Skills  Sc4 – Physical Processes –Forces and Motion (2a-d)

5 ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005

6 What can you do?  Simple measurements of altitude –Using triangulation –Video of flight  Measure velocity and acceleration –Frame capture/video  Launch and recover an egg  Take aerial photos  Fly some electronics –e.g. Altitude vs. time measurement  Start a rocket club

7 ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 What you need  Starter kit –Launch pad, electronic controller, one rocket –Cost ~ £25  Solid rocket motors –Purchase separately –Cost ~£5 per pack of 3  Igniters –Purchase spares –Cost ~£1.50 per pack of 6  Recovery wadding –Cost ~£3.00 per pack of 50 sheets (need 3 per flight)  Additional model rockets –Cheapest ~£6.00, up to ~£20.00  Risk Assessment –See example on

8 ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 Regulations  Rocket motors up to and including E – class are unregulated –i.e. No license required –You can fly these anywhere, within the bounds of common sense –But take note of safety codes  They  They do fall under the regulations for keeping and storing fireworks –You can purchase and keep limited quantities at home for near-term use –To store in a public building need a secure store and a license “to keep” (about £15 from local council)

9 ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 Suppliers  Model rocket shops –Deepsky Rockets (www.deepskyrocketshop.co.uk) –Rockets ‘n’ Things (www.rockets-things.co.uk) –Apollo 11 Rockets (www.apo11o.co.uk)  More information on the web –UK Rocket Association (www.ukra.org.uk) –Blastoff 4 Britain (www.blastoff4britain.org.uk)

10 ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 Rocket Engines

11 ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 Basic model rocket

12 ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 Rocket Preparation

13 ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 Rocket Preparation Rocket Preparation

14 ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 Safety Code 1.Launch Site - launch model rockets outdoors in a cleared area, free of tall trees, power lines, building and dry brush and grass. Launch site will be at least as large as that recommended in the following table. 2.Launcher - launch model rocket from a stable launch device that provides rigid guidance until the model rocket has reached a speed adequate to ensure a safe flight path. 3.To prevent accidental eye injury, always place the launcher so the end of the rod is above eye level or cap the end of the rod when approaching it. Cap or disassemble launch rod when not in use, never store it in an upright position. 4.Launcher will have a jet deflector device to prevent the engine exhaust from hitting the ground directly. Always clear the area around launch device of brown grass, dry weeds, or other easy-to-burn materials 4.Launcher - will have a jet deflector device to prevent the engine exhaust from hitting the ground directly. Always clear the area around launch device of brown grass, dry weeds, or other easy-to-burn materials Total Impulse Engine Type Minimum Size B 60 metres

15 ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 Safety Code 5.Ignition System - The system will be remotely controlled, electrically operated and will contain a launching switch that will return to off when released. The system will contain removable safety interlock in series with the launch switch. All persons will remain at least 15 feet (5 meters) from the model rocket. 6.Launch Safety - Ensure that people in the launch area are aware of the pending model rocket launch and can see the model rocket’s liftoff before beginning an audible five-second countdown. If rocket suffers a misfire, do not approach it or the launcher until the safety interlock has been removed or that the battery has been disconnected from the ignition system. Wait one minute after a misfire before approaching the launcher. 7.Flying Conditions - Launch rockets only when the wind is less than 20 miles (30 kilometers) an hour. Do not launch rockets into clouds, near aircraft in flight, or in a manner that is hazardous to people or property. 8.Launching Angle - Launch device will be pointed within 30 degrees of vertical. 9.Recovery Hazards - If a model rocket becomes entangled in a power line or other dangerous place, do not attempt to retrieve it. 10.Follow instructions!

16 ©M.A.Barstow – Rocket Workshop 2005 Finally  This presentation (rocket_iop.ppt) can be downloaded from… Along with the example risk assessment (included in NAGTY workshop document – nagty_rocketwkshop.doc)


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