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University of Southern California, Undergraduate Symposium for Scholarly and Creative Work, April 14 -16, 2014 Novel Membranes Using Polymeric and Nanomaterials.

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Presentation on theme: "University of Southern California, Undergraduate Symposium for Scholarly and Creative Work, April 14 -16, 2014 Novel Membranes Using Polymeric and Nanomaterials."— Presentation transcript:

1 University of Southern California, Undergraduate Symposium for Scholarly and Creative Work, April , 2014 Novel Membranes Using Polymeric and Nanomaterials for Water Reclamation Applications Undergraduate Research Students: Kirsten Rice (Viterbi) and Anthony Ross (Dornsife) Graduate Supervisors: Woohoe Kim (Viterbi), Merve Yurdacan (Dornsife) Faculty Advisors: Professor Massoud (Mike) Pirbazari, Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Theo E. Hogen-Esch, Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute Introduction and Background Improved membrane separations promise to yield substantial environmental and economic benefits that can enhance the global competitiveness of the United States by significantly reducing energy consumption, increasing industrial productivity, decreasing waste generation, and addressing water shortages. Environmental applications of membrane processes include water purification, wastewater treatment, and water reclamation and reuse. Membrane technologies face scientific and technological challenges: membrane fouling and permeate flux decline, poor rejection or selectivity, and large energy footprints. The present research is directed at developing high- performance membranes for use in various applications including integrated membrane systems. Rationale and Objectives Among various technologies, integrated systems such as membrane bioreactor process (MBR) processes have shown excellent potential for water reclamation, water reuse, groundwater recharge, and similar applications. Superior membranes with better aqueous transport and anti-fouling characteristics can make the technology more efficient and economical. The present work focuses on a synthesis-guided strategy to develop a class of polymer composites through infusion of nano-objects such as graphene oxide (GO), and graphene derivatives, yielding superior permeate fluxes, fouling resistance and rejection properties, while retaining favorable mechanical characteristics. A major goal of this work is production of low-energy and low-cost membrane technologies for water treatment and water reclamation to be used in developing countries. Polymer and Nano-Material Development Schemes Future Work The membrane filtration tests with membrane autopsy and surface characterization studies can be used for development of fouling resistant membranes. The content of nano-materials like GO in the polymer (polyamide) matrices will be optimized to further drastically improve membrane performance. One of the ultimate goals of developing the next generation nano- material and polymer composite membranes is to provide low-energy and low-cost membrane technologies for water treatment, water reclamation and similar applications in developing countries. Summary and Discussion The initial work involved the development of polymer synthesis protocols with appropriate reaction schemes, free-radical processes, syntheses conditions such as reaction times, curing procedures, and quantitatively controlled incorporation of graphene oxide (GO) into the polymers. Superior membranes were manufactured by adjusting these conditions. The membranes were prepared by interfacial polymerization by sequential addition of MPD and TMC on a commercial polyether sulfone (PES) ultrafiltration membrane base with a nominal pore size of 0.08 micron and molecular weight cutoff off (MWCO) of 10,000 Daltons. This is one of the best commercially available ultrafiltration membranes for water reclamation and related applications. The presence of GO in the polymer matrix improved not only the steady- state permeate flux (membranes #1 and #2) but also did not compromise with TOC rejection (slightly higher TOC rejection of 32.6% versus 30.9%). Qualitatively similar results were observed when PAC was added to the feed to probe the role of GO, if any, regarding membrane fouling. Thus, the permeate fluxes and TOC rejections (after steady state was reached after 3 hours) were higher for membrane #2* as compared to #1* (presence of GO, see table). The use of CSA and TEA during the polymerization (membrane #3) yielded a flux of 37 L/m 2 /h at 2 and 3 hours, but gave lower TOC rejection of 18.6%. It is important to observe the GO content on aqueous transport and organic rejection to optimize membrane performance. DI water 65% recovery 91% recovery82% recovery Surfactant A NaOH Figure 3. Permeate flux and TOC after membrane cleaning using deionized distilled (DI) water, surfactant Triton X- 100 at 5 mg/L (surfactant A), and dilute sodium hydroxide (1 mM); the cleaning run is for 1 hour. The results show that Trition X-100 surfactant yielded a permeate flux recovery of 91%, much higher than the 82% flux recovery observed after caustic cleaning using sodium hydroxide. The use of DI water yielded a low flux recovery of 61%. The TOC after surfactant cleaning was as low as that observed after caustic cleaning. The higher rejection after cleaning reflects the favorable change in membrane surface properties to separate out more natural organic matter (as TOC). Polymer membranes with different types of nanomaterials at various concentrations Future work Development of hollow-fiber membranes for integrated membrane systems Polymer types based on various formulation schemes and annealing processes Membrane optimization of material composition:  Mechanical integrity tests  Chemical tolerance tests  Membrane tests for permeate flux and rejection  Membrane cleaning tests for flux recovery  Membrane autopsy studies using spectroscopy, microscopy, and bio-molecular techniques Scheme-1. Synthesis of Polyamide Copolymers for membrane fabrication Scheme-2. Partially sulfonated polyamides for membrane applications Scheme-4. Synthesis of graphene oxide-modified polyamides Scheme-3. Chemical modification of graphene oxide for infusion into polymeric matrices Experimental Methodologies and Analytical Techniques Membrane characterization tests Atomic force microscopy (AFM) Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) Membrane#1#2 + #1*#2* + #3 ++ UF control Time (h)Permeate flux (L/m 2 /h) TOC rejection ( %) Membranes designated as # 1 and # 2 were all synthesized by interfacial polymerization (for ~ 1 minute) using MPD and TMC, and cured at room temperature of 60 o C for 10 minutes, except for the presence of GO for membrane #2. Membrane #3 was synthesized by a similar procedure using MPD and TMC followed by CSA and TEA. Membranes # 1* and #2* were replicates of membranes #1 and #2, and were tested with 40 mg/L of powder activated carbon (PAC) added to the feed. The purpose of these tests was to assess the performances of the membranes (#1 and #2) in the presence of powder activated carbon (PAC) regarding permeate flux and TOC rejection. + Membrane is infused with graphene oxide (GO) *Powder activated carbon (PAC) was used in the feed at 40 mg/L Table 1. Comparison of performances of different membranes with reference to permeate fluxes and TOC rejection Figure 1. Overall research plan for membrane performance optimization Figure 2. Schematic of the plate-and-frame test cell for membrane filtration tests Results Researchers in the Laboratory Acknowledgment We would like to thank the Provost Undergraduate Research Associates Program at the University of Southern California for providing the majority of funding for this project.


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