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Anti-Truancy Strategies Madison Medenwaldt and Chelsey Brinker, Dr. Susan Wolfgram, University of Wisconsin-Stout What are the attitudes of truancy workers.

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Presentation on theme: "Anti-Truancy Strategies Madison Medenwaldt and Chelsey Brinker, Dr. Susan Wolfgram, University of Wisconsin-Stout What are the attitudes of truancy workers."— Presentation transcript:

1 Anti-Truancy Strategies Madison Medenwaldt and Chelsey Brinker, Dr. Susan Wolfgram, University of Wisconsin-Stout What are the attitudes of truancy workers from a small western Wisconsin non-profit that works with youth and families regarding effective developmental strategies when working with truant students grades 6-12? Our hypothesis was that the more individualized, long term, and personal strategies (examples: Case Management, Family Support) will be more effective than the impersonal, “pre-packaged” strategies (examples: warning letter, fine enforced One was to examine the attitudes of truancy workers towards common truancy prevention strategies with a sample of one current and one former truancy specialist The second was we followed qualitative interview protocol. Third was that the results from this study would increase the awareness of truancy workers about which truancy strategies are most and least effective, thus making their work more efficient because they will be able to put their efforts into more effective practices Thomas, Lemieux, Rhodes, and Vlosky (2011), It was found that truancy clearly declined with the case management; however, the truancy stayed the same for those who received the warning letter. Hendricks, Sale, Evan, and McKinley, and DeLozier (2010) The results show that the Prevention Program was effective on the attendance rates but not for long-term results. Peek (2009) They compared the two intervention strategies and Perfect Pals was found to be the most effective program with 71% of the people choosing it; the results show that these programs were very effective for students and they helped improve attendance rates. Enea and Dafinoiu (2009) Qualitative themes emerging from the motivational interviewing included that students wanted immediate results and additional advantages to attending school. As professionals, we need to identify new support/encouragement strategies as opposed to punishment. Newsome, Anderson-Butcher, Fink, Hall, and Huffer (2008) They found that increasingly intensive interventions promoted better outcomes, and by pursuing their work from a “whole picture point of view”, a view that would encompass the student, family, school, and community as a whole, is more effective than targeting just one of those areas Social Exchange Theory (Strong, DeVault, Cohen, 2005) Reward – Cost = Outcome How this applied to our study: Rewarding strategies would help the student feel that the benefits of attending school may be worth the costs Punishing students for not attending school would not show the truant student a positive outlook on school. This would lead to the student not seeing the value in school and chances are would not decrease truancy rates. By individualizing each reward it would show the student he/she is valued, making the benefits of school higher than the costs The purposive sampling method was used because us as researchers wanted to speak with specific truancy professionals and we went to them to get their knowledge on the questions that we had. The snowball sampling was used, as Madison was the insider who introduced her partner to the participants. Interviews were used for data collection (Meho, 2006) The reason we chose to do our research via was it was the most flexible method to accommodate our sample and was useful under our time restrictions. Larger number of participants-More perspectives and More varied demographics Quantitative as well-Adding a quantitative component to investigate a larger sample of truancy workers This research is very important in our field because the faster you begin implementing successful strategies with truant students the sooner these children begin on the path to a better future. Both of our truancy experts felt that one-on one case management is the best way to ensure that you get to the real reason that the student is truant. By finding the strategies that have been shown to be most effective for truant students it really speeds up the process to really lowering truancy numbers and the students on their way to be successful individuals. “In order to make a lasting and effective change, the student needs to identify their need to attend school and their own resolve to overcome whatever barriers are hindering their attendance – whether that be emotional, psychological, environmental, etc.” (Alyssa) Research Question Hypothesis Purposes of Study Literature Review Theoretical Framework Methods Implications for Future Research from Investigator’s Perspective Conclusion Participants Participant 1Participant 2 GenderFemale Years of Experience15 DegreeCriminal JusticeVocational Rehabilitation


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