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MEG/EEG Inverse problem and solutions In a Bayesian Framework EEG/MEG SPM course, Bruxelles, 2011 Jérémie Mattout Lyon Neuroscience Research Centre ? ?

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Presentation on theme: "MEG/EEG Inverse problem and solutions In a Bayesian Framework EEG/MEG SPM course, Bruxelles, 2011 Jérémie Mattout Lyon Neuroscience Research Centre ? ?"— Presentation transcript:

1 MEG/EEG Inverse problem and solutions In a Bayesian Framework EEG/MEG SPM course, Bruxelles, 2011 Jérémie Mattout Lyon Neuroscience Research Centre ? ? With many thanks to Karl Friston, Christophe Phillips, Rik Henson, Jean Daunizeau

2 Talk’s Overview SPM rationale -generative models -probabilistic framework -Twofold inference: parameters & models EEG/MEG inverse problem and SPM solution(s) -probabilistic generative models -Parameter inference and model comparison

3 Model: "measure, standard" ; representation or object that enables to describe the functionning of a physical system or concept A model enables you to: - Simulate data - Estimate (non-observables) parameters - Predict future observations - Test hypothesis / Compare models Stimulations Physiological Observations Behavioural Observations A word about generative models

4 Model: "measure, standard" ; representation or object that enables to describe the functionning of a physical system or concept A model enables you to: - Simulate data - Estimate (non-observables) parameters - Predict future observations - Test hypothesis / Compare models MEG Observations (Y) Auditory-Visual Stimulations (u) Sources/Network (  ) Y = f( ,u) Model m: f, , u A word about generative models

5 Probabilistic / Bayesian framework Probability of an event: - represented by real numbers - conforms to intuition - is consistent a=2 b=5 a=2 normalization: marginalization: conditioning : (Bayes rule)

6 Probabilistic modelling MEG Observations (Y) Auditory-Visual Stimulations (u) Sources/Network (  ) Y = f( ,u) Model m: f, , u Probabilistic modelling enables: - To formalize mathematically our knowledge in a model m - To account for uncertainty - To make inference on both model parameters and models themselves Prior Likelihood Marginal or Evidence Posterior

7 A toy example MEG Observations (Y) Y = L  + ɛ Model m: - One dipolar source with known position and orientation. - Amplitude ? Source gain vector Source amplitude Measurment noise Linear f Gaussian distributions Likelihood Prior

8 A toy example MEG Observations (Y) Model m: Bayes rule Posterior

9 Occam’s razor or principle of parsimony Hypothesis testing: model comparison Evidence « complexity should not be assumed without necessity » model evidence p(y|m) space of all data sets y=f(x) x

10 Bayesian factor space of all datasets define the null and the alternative hypothesis H (or model m) in terms of priors, e.g.: ifthen reject H0 invert both generative models (obtain both model evidences) apply decision rule, i.e.: Hypothesis testing: model comparison

11 Probabilistic framing EEG/MEG inverse problem forward computation Likelihood & Prior inverse computation Posterior & Evidence

12 Distributed/Imaging model EEG/MEG inverse problem Likelihood Parameters  : (J,  ) Hypothesis m: distributed (linear) model, gain matrix L, gaussian distributions Prior Sensor level # sources IID (Minimum Norm) Maximum Smoothness (LORETA-like) Source level # sensors

13 Incorporating Multiple Constraints EEG/MEG inverse problem Likelihood Paramètres  : (J, , ) Hypothèses m: hierarchical model, operator L + components C Prior Source (or sensor) level Multiple Sparse Priors (MSP) …

14 Expectation Maximization (EM) / Restricted Maximum Likelihood (ReML) / Free-Energy optimization / Parametric Empirical Bayes (PEB) Estimation procedure M-step E-step accuracy complexity Iterative scheme

15 Model comparison based on the Free-energy Estimation procedure model M i FiFi At convergence

16 At the end of the day Somesthesic data

17 - Pharmacoresistive Epilepsy (surgery planning): symptoms PET + sIRM SEEG Could MEG replace or at least complement and guide SEEG ? Romain Bouet Julien Jung François Maugière Seizure 120 patients : MEG proved very much informative in 85 patients 30s Example MEG - Epilepsy

18 Patient 1 : model comparison MEG (best model) SEEG Example Romain Bouet Julien Jung François Maugière MEG - Epilepsy

19 Patient 2 : estimated dynamics temps SEEG lésion occipitale Romain Bouet Julien Jung François Maugière Example MEG - Epilepsy

20 Conclusion The SPM probabilistic inverse modelling approach enables to: Estimate both parameters and hyperparameters from the data Incorporate multiple priors of different nature Estimate a full posterior distribution over model parameters Estimate an approximation to the log-evidence (the free-energy) which enables model comparison based on the same data Encompass multimodal fusion and group analysis gracefully Note that SPM also include a flexible and convenient meshing tool, as well as beamforming solutions and a Bayesian ECD approach…

21 Thank you for your attention

22 Graphical representation EEG/MEG inverse problem Fixed Variable Data

23 Fusion of different modality

24 Incorporating fMRI priors

25 Hypothesis testing: inference on parameters Frequentist vs. Bayesian approach ifthen reject H0 estimate parameters (obtain test stat.) define the null, e.g.: apply decision rule, i.e.: classical inference (SPM) ifthen accept H0 invert model (obtain posterior pdf) define the null, e.g.: apply decision rule, i.e.: Bayesian inference (PPM)


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