Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The Discovery Corridor Concept and its Applicability January 13/14, 2004 workshop St. Andrews Biological Station, St. Andrews, N.B.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The Discovery Corridor Concept and its Applicability January 13/14, 2004 workshop St. Andrews Biological Station, St. Andrews, N.B."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Discovery Corridor Concept and its Applicability January 13/14, 2004 workshop St. Andrews Biological Station, St. Andrews, N.B.

2 MARINE BIODIVERSITY DISCOVERY CORRIDORS Background 1. Three Oceans of Biodiversity: Development of a science plan for marine biodiversity in Canada workshop, 2003 report 2.September 2003 CMB organizational meeting

3 Three Oceans of Biodiversity: Development of a Science Plan for Marine Biodiversity in Canada. White Point 2002 workshop Kees Zwanenburg et al Can. Tech. Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci 2432: 72p. Objectives: 1.To identify the present knowledge and knowledge gaps about marine biodiversity in Canada’s three oceans; 2.To identify the present state of knowledge on major processes affecting biodiversity; 3.To develop a 5-10 year plan outlining data collection and research directions to address gaps; 4.To establish a national committee on marine biodiversity to implement and adapt the plan.

4 White Point 2002 workshop Summary matrix: Canada’s obligation under CBD : inventory, monitor & conserve biological diversity as organized by the three levels of diversity. Conceptual framework: InventoryMonitorConserve Ecosystem Species Population

5 Three Oceans of Biodiversity: Development of a Science Plan for Marine Biodiversity in Canada. White Point 2002 workshop Conclusions: Our understanding of the scope of marine biological diversity is limited because: 1.Inventory of diversity is complete for only a small number of species;  Particularly lacking in knowledge of micro-fauna, and fauna of the arctic, continental slope and abyssal plain; 2.Knowledge limited on the:  range of natural variation in distribution and abundance and controlling processes;  population structure of many groups and is restricted to a few areas;  relationship between habitats and community structure and distribution; 3.Lack undisturbed marine areas against which to measure natural environmental variation and relative impacts of human activities; 4.Poor understanding of long-term, cumulative effects of human activities.

6 Three Oceans of Biodiversity: Development of a Science Plan for Marine Biodiversity in Canada. White Point 2002 workshop Conclusions (con’t): 1.Knowledge gaps should not limit actions to conserve marine biodiversity. 2.Maintenance of current MPAs and areas of restricted access should be maintained and expanded. 3.New analyses needed to classify marine habitats and associated communities coupled with taxonomic and geographic expansion of current monitoring programs. 4.Classification essential to the identification of locations for a network of marine biodiversity reference areas which encompass both unique and representative areas. 5.Once established these areas could provide: 1.Controls against which changes in non-reference areas can be measured; 2.Locations for process oriented studies can be carried out in the absence (or nearly so) of human effects.

7 ActionsInventoryMonitorInstitutionalConserve Immediate complete registries/inventories make data widely available (OBIS) evaluate effectiveness of existing monitoring programs establish network consolidate collections apply (test) scientific principles & theories re: processes – patterns in BD Near-term fill in identified gaps pilot project to evaluate methods improve surveys re-build taxonomic expertise enhance support for museums Long-term complete ID of marine biodiversity establish observatories (e.g. discovery corridors) sustain expertise theoretical framework for rational development of MPAs Operational framework.

8 MARINE BIODIVERSITY DISCOVERY CORRIDORS Background: September 2003 CMB organizational meeting The concept of having a geographic focus for research activities was generally accepted. Benefits were seen in: 1.the use of the locations as foci for taxonomic work; 2.the establishment of a cohesive biological program to integrate with ongoing physical oceanographic initiatives in the region; 3.the educational value of such a project for the general public, especially if land-based interpretative centres were developed. The location, including footprint, and number of locations was left open.

9 St. Andrews workshop objectives: 1.Discuss and develop further the concept of Discovery Corridors/Areas; 2.Develop a prioritized list of the potential objectives/hypotheses that would be best addressed in such areas; 3.Propose the location(s) of such corridors, including identification of a pilot corridor.


Download ppt "The Discovery Corridor Concept and its Applicability January 13/14, 2004 workshop St. Andrews Biological Station, St. Andrews, N.B."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google