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SHIP’S MEASUREMENT Lesson 3. 0. Basic vocabulary 1.

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Presentation on theme: "SHIP’S MEASUREMENT Lesson 3. 0. Basic vocabulary 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 SHIP’S MEASUREMENT Lesson 3

2 0. Basic vocabulary 1

3 0. Basic voacbulary 1 - answers  1. length  2. height  3. width  4. depth  5. diameter  6. thickness  7. area  8. volume

4 0. Basic vocabulary 2

5 0. Basic vocabulary 2 – answers  length – long  width – wide  height – high  depth – deep  thickness - thick

6 0. Baisc vocabulary 3

7 1. General – Units of measurement  In engineering 3 types of METRIC UNITS are used:  1. BASIC METRIC UNITS refer to LINEAR DIMENSIONS, i.e. those which can be measured in a straight line and are: a) LENGTH b) HEIGHT c) WIDTH or BREADTH d) THICKNESS e) DEPTH  Other basic units as KILOGRAMME, SECOND, RADIAN are used to describe physical quantities as MASS, TIME, ANGLE

8 1. General – Units of measurement 2. DERIVED METRIC UNITS DERIVED METRIC UNITS are the products of the BASIC units and are: AREA VOLUME CAPACITY AREA is obtained by multiplying the basic units of LENGHT and BREADTH (WIDTH) and is measured in SQUARE METRES

9 1. General – Units of measurement VOLUME and CAPACITY are measured in CUBED LINEAR UNITS as CUBIC METRES The volume & capacity of liquids can be measured in LITRES. VOLUME is the “ space occupied by an object or substance “ CAPACITY is the “ ability of a container or tank to hold something”.

10 1. General – Units of measurement 3. COMPOUND METRIC UNITS COMPOUND UNITS are made up of BASIC and DERIVED UNITS OF MEASUREMENT such as : STRESS POWER ENERGY ACCELERATION WORK

11 1.1 Basic metric units- exercises  The bar is three metres ( GB ) / meters ( US ) long.  The bar is three meters in lenght.  The bar has a lenght of three meters.  The lenght of the bar is three meters.  The driving belt is sixty millimeters broad / wide.  The driving belt is sixty millimeters in breadth / width.  The driving belt has a breadth / width of sixty millimeters.  The breadth / width of the driving belt is sixty millimeters.  The support tower is one / a hundred meters high.  The support tower is one hundred meters in height.  The support tower has a height of one hundred meters.  The height of the support tower is one hundred meters.

12 1.1 Basic metric units- exercises  The sheet is three millimeters thick.  The sheet has a thickness of three millimeters.  The thickness of the sheet is three millimeters.  The trench is two meters deep.  The trench is two meters in depth.  The trench has a depth of two meters.  The depth of the trench is two meters.  The block has a mass of 50 kilogrammes ( GB ) / kilograms ( US ).  The block is of 50 kg. mass.  The mass of the block is fifty kilogrammes.

13 1.2 Derived metric units - exercises  The plate has an area of six square meters.  The plate is six square meters in area.  The area of the plate is six square meters.  The brick has a volume of one thousand six hundred cubic centimeters.  The brick is one thousand six hundred cubic centimeters in volume.  The volume of the brick is one thousand six hundred cubic centimeters.  The tank has a capacity of twenty - four cubic meters.  The tank is twenty - four cubic meters in capacity.  The capacity of the tank is twenty - four cubic meters.

14 2. Shapes

15 2. Shapes - exercise  It is shaped like a circle. – It’s circular in shape.  It is shaped like a cylinder. –...  It is shaped like a sphere. –...

16 3. Tonnage = a measure of the size or cargo carrying capacity of a ship = the amount of cargo the vessel is capable of carryingcargoship Gross Register Tonnage Net Tonnage Deadweight Tonnage

17 3.1 Gross Register Tonnage  the entire volume of the enclosed spaces of the vessel that can be used for cargo, stores and accommodation

18 3.2 Net tonnage  volume that can be used to carry cargo  it is calculated by deducing the spaces that are not used for cargo from the gross tonnage  often used to calculate harbour dues

19 3.3 Deadweight tonnage  the weight of all the contents a vessel is capable of carrying when loaded to summer mark

20 4. Cargo spaces  Bale space  Grain space  Oil space  Ullage

21 4.1 Bale space  the volume of the cargo holds that can be used to carry general cargo

22 4.2 Grain space  the volume of the cargo holds that can be used to carry dry bulk cargo

23 4.3 Oil space  98 % of the total volume of wet bulk tanks

24 4.4 Ullage  empty space on top of the liquid level that will prevent a tank from overflowing when oil expands due to heat

25 5. Displacement  the amount of water that the ship displaces while floating  the weight of the displaced fluid is directly proportional to the volume of the displaced fluid (if the surrounding fluid is of uniform density).

26 5. Displacement  Archimedes’ principls (Archimede’s principle) states that the buoyant force on an object is going to be equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object, or the density of the fluid multiplied by the submerged volume times the gravitational constant, e.g. among completely submerged objects with equal masses, objects with greater volume have greater buoyancy.

27 6. Dimensions  Length Over All (L.O.A.)  Length between Perpendiculars  Breadth / Width  Moulded breadth  Moulded depth  Beam

28 6. Dimensions

29

30 6.1 Length Over All (L.O.A.)  the length from the extreme point of stern to the extreme point of stem (bow)

31 6.2 Breadth / Width  the breadth (width) measured to the outside surface of plating

32 6.3 Moulded breadth  the horizontal distance between the insides of the moulds  breadth at the widest point measured to the outside surface of the frames

33 6.4 Moulded depth  vertical distance between the insides of the moulds (including the double bottom)  the vertical distance amidships from the top of keel to the top of deck beam at the underside of the deck plating at ship's side

34 6.5 Beam  the extreme breadth of the vessel  important for obtaining clearance to proceed in restricted, narrow fairways

35 6.6 Length Between Perpendiculars  is measured between the fore perpendicular and aft-perpendicular

36 6.7 Construction waterline  line to which the ship may be loaded in summer

37 6.8 Draught (draft)  the vertical distance from the surface of the water (waterline) to the vessel's bottom  loaded draft, light draft, salt-water draft, fresh- water draft

38 6.9 Freeboard  the vertical distance from the water to the weather deck edge at any point in the lenght of the ship  distance between the deckline and waterline

39 6.10 Height or Air draught  distance from the waterline to the highest point of the vessel  vertical clearance

40 6.11 Underkeel Clearance  the distance between keel and seabed


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